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Gzip compression and ASP.NET

P: n/a
Hi

Does anyone have experience using gZip compression on the IIS server with a
ASP.NET application. How much can a page be compressed. As i see it it must
have a huge impact on the total size. Eg. if i take a 400 kb (260 rows in a
datagrid with viewstate) and saveit as txt file an compress it with winzip i
zipped to around 30 kb. Thats something! Is the compression rate in the same
area on the IIS server?

Is there any penalties expect a higher CPU usage from the IIS server? (No
problem in our application) Pther problem that i should be aware of?

Thank in regards
Anders Jacobsen
Nov 19 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
"Anders K. Jacobsen [DK]" <no**@at.all> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
Hi

Does anyone have experience using gZip compression on the IIS server with
a ASP.NET application. How much can a page be compressed. As i see it it
must have a huge impact on the total size. Eg. if i take a 400 kb (260
rows in a datagrid with viewstate) and saveit as txt file an compress it
with winzip i zipped to around 30 kb. Thats something! Is the compression
rate in the same area on the IIS server?

Is there any penalties expect a higher CPU usage from the IIS server? (No
problem in our application) Pther problem that i should be aware of?
No. It just rocks. But just a little system admins configure IIS with
compression. A big pity...
Expect compression up to 90%
Thank in regards
Anders Jacobsen


Nov 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
Anders K. Jacobsen [DK] wrote:
Hi

Does anyone have experience using gZip compression on the IIS server
with a ASP.NET application. How much can a page be compressed. As i
see it it must have a huge impact on the total size.
From what I've experienced in web applications, expect compression rated of
at least 70%.

[...] Is there any penalties expect a higher CPU usage from the IIS server?
(No problem in our application) Pther problem that i should be aware
of?


For high traffic sites, you can perform compression through specialized
hardware like Redline T|X boxes.

Cheers,

--
Joerg Jooss
www.joergjooss.de
ne**@joergjooss.de
Nov 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
> No. It just rocks. But just a little system admins configure IIS with
compression. A big pity...
Expect compression up to 90%


Sounds just great. Ill look into it.What browsers can handle gzip
compression?

Anders
Nov 19 '05 #4

P: n/a
Anders K. Jacobsen [DK] wrote:
No. It just rocks. But just a little system admins configure IIS with
compression. A big pity...
Expect compression up to 90%


Sounds just great. Ill look into it.What browsers can handle gzip
compression?


At least all modern versions of IE, Mozilla/Firefox, and Opera (don't know
about Safari, but HTTP compression has been around for years now) . HTTP
compression is only applied if the user agent sends an appropriate
"Accept-Encoding" header, so even older browsers will continue to work, but
recieve uncompressed content.

Cheers,

--
Joerg Jooss
www.joergjooss.de
ne**@joergjooss.de
Nov 19 '05 #5

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