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Date in database

P: n/a
On my machine in the office I change the computer setting to English (UK) so
the date format is dd/mm/yyyy instead of mm/dd/yyyy for US.
This problem happens in either Access or SQL Server.
In the database I have a table with Date/time column. The database is
located on a machine that is set to dd/mm/yyyy also.
When I enter date 7/1/08 (as in January 7, 2008), it stores it in the
database as 1/7/08 instead of 7/1/08. Why is it like that and how can I make
the database stores it as 7/1/08 ?
Thank you.
Jan 8 '08 #1
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30 Replies


P: n/a

You can set the regional date format to anything you like, but when using SQLs to
insert or update data, you must use the yyyy-mm-dd format for SQL Server or the
mm/dd/yyyy format for Access.

If using the Addnew method then assigning the date value to the field, you must use
a date variable type:

dim strDate as string

strDate = date

open recordset "rs"

rs.addnew
rs!DateField = strDate
rs.update

The above wont work!!! (for any date format other than mm/dd/yyyy)

Change it to this:

dim dteDate as date

dteDate = date

open recordset "rs"

rs.addnew
rs!DateField = dteDate
rs.update

This example is so trivial, that you can assign Date directly, but when using
calculated dates the variable will most likely be needed.

To build an SQL with a date:

sSQL = "insert into MyTable (Mydate) values ("
sSQL = sSQL & "'" & format$(date, "yyyy-mm-dd") & "')"

For Access change that to:

sSQL = sSQL & "'" & format$(date, "mm/dd/yyyy") & "')"

HTH Saga
--

"fniles" <fn*******@SPAMMEpfmail.comwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
On my machine in the office I change the computer setting to English (UK) so the date format is
dd/mm/yyyy instead of mm/dd/yyyy for US.
This problem happens in either Access or SQL Server.
In the database I have a table with Date/time column. The database is located on a machine that is
set to dd/mm/yyyy also.
When I enter date 7/1/08 (as in January 7, 2008), it stores it in the database as 1/7/08 instead
of 7/1/08. Why is it like that and how can I make the database stores it as 7/1/08 ?
Thank you.


Jan 8 '08 #2

P: n/a
Access will work fine with yyyy-mm-dd as well. However, you need to delimit
the dates with # characters in Access, not single quotes.

--
Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
http://I.Am/DougSteele
(no private e-mails, please)
"Saga" <an******@somewhere.comwrote in message
news:e2**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
This example is so trivial, that you can assign Date directly, but when
using
calculated dates the variable will most likely be needed.

To build an SQL with a date:

sSQL = "insert into MyTable (Mydate) values ("
sSQL = sSQL & "'" & format$(date, "yyyy-mm-dd") & "')"

For Access change that to:

sSQL = sSQL & "'" & format$(date, "mm/dd/yyyy") & "')"
"fniles" <fn*******@SPAMMEpfmail.comwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>On my machine in the office I change the computer setting to English (UK)
so the date format is dd/mm/yyyy instead of mm/dd/yyyy for US.
This problem happens in either Access or SQL Server.
In the database I have a table with Date/time column. The database is
located on a machine that is set to dd/mm/yyyy also.
When I enter date 7/1/08 (as in January 7, 2008), it stores it in the
database as 1/7/08 instead of 7/1/08. Why is it like that and how can I
make the database stores it as 7/1/08 ?
Thank you.

Jan 8 '08 #3

P: n/a
Thanks for catching that :-) I neglected to swap out the quotes for the # char.

Noted on the yyyy-mm-dd format for Access.

Saga
--
"Douglas J. Steele" <NOSPAM_djsteele@NOSPAM_canada.comwrote in message
news:OJ*************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
Access will work fine with yyyy-mm-dd as well. However, you need to delimit the dates with #
characters in Access, not single quotes.

--
Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
http://I.Am/DougSteele
(no private e-mails, please)
"Saga" <an******@somewhere.comwrote in message news:e2**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
>This example is so trivial, that you can assign Date directly, but when using
calculated dates the variable will most likely be needed.

To build an SQL with a date:

sSQL = "insert into MyTable (Mydate) values ("
sSQL = sSQL & "'" & format$(date, "yyyy-mm-dd") & "')"

For Access change that to:

sSQL = sSQL & "'" & format$(date, "mm/dd/yyyy") & "')"
"fniles" <fn*******@SPAMMEpfmail.comwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>>On my machine in the office I change the computer setting to English (UK) so the date format is
dd/mm/yyyy instead of mm/dd/yyyy for US.
This problem happens in either Access or SQL Server.
In the database I have a table with Date/time column. The database is located on a machine that
is set to dd/mm/yyyy also.
When I enter date 7/1/08 (as in January 7, 2008), it stores it in the database as 1/7/08 instead
of 7/1/08. Why is it like that and how can I make the database stores it as 7/1/08 ?
Thank you.


Jan 8 '08 #4

P: n/a

"fniles" <fn****@pfmail.comwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
On my machine in the office I change the computer setting to English (UK)
so the date format is dd/mm/yyyy instead of mm/dd/yyyy for US.
This problem happens in either Access or SQL Server.
In the database I have a table with Date/time column. The database is
located on a machine that is set to dd/mm/yyyy also.
When I enter date 7/1/08 (as in January 7, 2008), it stores it in the
database as 1/7/08 instead of 7/1/08. Why is it like that and how can I
make the database stores it as 7/1/08 ?
If the data type of the column is truly one of the various "date" data
types, the format of the date is irrelevant. Don't worry about it.

However, if the data type is actually text or characters, then you've got a
huge problem.
--
Mike
Microsoft MVP Visual Basic
Jan 8 '08 #5

P: n/a
Thank you everybody.
It turns out that in VB it works fine, but it does not work in ASP.
The data type of the column is truly a "date/time" column in Access
and "Datetime" column in SQL Server.

I do need the date to be stored in the correct format in the database,
because in my ASP program I do the following:
sDay = day(d)
sMonth = month(d)
sYear = year(d)
If it is not stored correctly in the database, the above functions do
not return the correct values.

It seems to work when I do the following (it stores 8/1/08 in the
database)
ssql = "update myTBL set colDate = format('8/1/08','dd/mm/yy') where
ID = 1"
Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.open ssql

But when I do the following, it stores 1/8/08 in the database:
ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.CursorType = adOpenKeyset
rs.LockType = adLockOptimistic
rs.Source = sSql
rs.Open
rs("colDate") = cdate(#8/1/08#) '--got the same result when i do
rs("colDate") = cdate("8/1/08")
rs.Update
rs.close
set rs = nothing

I could use the "update" command on the 1st method, but I would like
to use the 2nd method if possible. Is it possible to make the 2nd
method above work ?
Thank you.
On Jan 8, 5:41*pm, "MikeD" <nob...@nowhere.eduwrote:
"fniles" <fni...@pfmail.comwrote in message

news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
On my machine in the office I change the computer setting to English (UK)
so the date format is dd/mm/yyyy instead of mm/dd/yyyy for US.
This problem happens in either Access or SQL Server.
In the database I have a table with Date/time column. The database is
located on a machine that is set to dd/mm/yyyy also.
When I enter date 7/1/08 (as in January 7, 2008), it stores it in the
database as 1/7/08 instead of 7/1/08. Why is it like that and how can I
make the database stores it as 7/1/08 ?

If the data type of the column is truly one of the various "date" data
types, the format of the date is irrelevant. Don't worry about it.

However, if the data type is actually text or characters, then you've got a
huge problem.

--
Mike
Microsoft MVP Visual Basic
Jan 9 '08 #6

P: n/a
>>I do need the date to be stored in the correct format in the database,

The database has it's own way of storing dates - typically in a Julian
value.
How you want to display it is done via formating.

Take a look at this link:
http://www.sql-server-performance.co...tatype_p1.aspx

I myself work mainly with Oracle, which I think does something similar and
occasionally with Access.

Not sure about Access, but a google search could get you the details I'm
sure.
But what the Database engine itself is storing is irrelevant.
What's important is getting the data entered properly and displayed as
needed.

Steve Mussler

Jan 9 '08 #7

P: n/a

Inline

Saga

--
<fi*************@SPAMMEgmail.comwrote in message
news:45**********************************@v4g2000h sf.googlegroups.com...
Thank you everybody.
It turns out that in VB it works fine, but it does not work in ASP.
The data type of the column is truly a "date/time" column in Access
and "Datetime" column in SQL Server.

I do need the date to be stored in the correct format in the database,
because in my ASP program I do the following:
sDay = day(d)
sMonth = month(d)
sYear = year(d)
If it is not stored correctly in the database, the above functions do
not return the correct values.

It seems to work when I do the following (it stores 8/1/08 in the
database)
ssql = "update myTBL set colDate = format('8/1/08','dd/mm/yy') where
ID = 1"

***Reply***
That format statement just does not look right. Use 4 digits for year
and yyyy-mm-dd format. Using dd/mm/yy will cause problems.
***

Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.open ssql

But when I do the following, it stores 1/8/08 in the database:
ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.CursorType = adOpenKeyset
rs.LockType = adLockOptimistic
rs.Source = sSql
rs.Open
rs("colDate") = cdate(#8/1/08#)
'--got the same result when i do rs("colDate") = cdate("8/1/08")

***Reply***
When specifying a literal date (#8/1/08#) VB always expects mm/dd/yyyy
format. So the above will be interpreted as Aug 1st, 2008. The CDate(##)
statement above is useless since you are in effect converting a date into
a date.

On the other hand, cdate("8/1/08") is converting the string "8/1/08"into a
date which is a step in the right direction, but it is still not 100% "safe":

"CDate recognizes date formats according to the locale setting of your
system." - MSDN Library

I did the following in the immediate window:

? cdate("8/1/08")
08/01/2008 (2nd) 8th of Jan
8/1/2008 (1st) Aug 1st

I set my regional settings to English US for the 1st try. I then set the
regional settings to English UK for the 2nd test. Note how the "same" date
was displayed, but is intepreted differently depending on locale. Best to stay
away from having dates in strings and using these to update tables or do
further date calculations where the month and day could be ambiguous.

I did another test (in the immediate wndow):

? #8/1/2008#
8/1/2008 US setting Aug 1st 2008
01/08/2008 UK setting 1st of Aug 2008 Same date!!!

Note how the above literal is interpreted as the same date but when displayed
it is done using the correct locale format. As mentioned before, when the #
char is used to specify a date literal it is always interpreted as mm/dd/yyyy.
***

rs.Update
rs.close
set rs = nothing

I could use the "update" command on the 1st method, but I would like
to use the 2nd method if possible. Is it possible to make the 2nd
method above work ?
Thank you.
***PS: I have no idea why the OP's text was not indented with the ">"
char. It seems to have been only for this message.

On Jan 8, 5:41 pm, "MikeD" <nob...@nowhere.eduwrote:
"fniles" <fni...@pfmail.comwrote in message

news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
On my machine in the office I change the computer setting to English (UK)
so the date format is dd/mm/yyyy instead of mm/dd/yyyy for US.
This problem happens in either Access or SQL Server.
In the database I have a table with Date/time column. The database is
located on a machine that is set to dd/mm/yyyy also.
When I enter date 7/1/08 (as in January 7, 2008), it stores it in the
database as 1/7/08 instead of 7/1/08. Why is it like that and how can I
make the database stores it as 7/1/08 ?

If the data type of the column is truly one of the various "date" data
types, the format of the date is irrelevant. Don't worry about it.

However, if the data type is actually text or characters, then you've got a
huge problem.

--
Mike
Microsoft MVP Visual Basic

Jan 9 '08 #8

P: n/a
fniles wrote:
On my machine in the office I change the computer setting to English (UK) so
the date format is dd/mm/yyyy instead of mm/dd/yyyy for US.
This problem happens in either Access or SQL Server.
In the database I have a table with Date/time column. The database is
located on a machine that is set to dd/mm/yyyy also.
When I enter date 7/1/08 (as in January 7, 2008), it stores it in the
database as 1/7/08 instead of 7/1/08. Why is it like that and how can I make
the database stores it as 7/1/08 ?
Thank you.
Would setting the locale help?
Not sure if your using VBScript, but here is something about it:
http://www.w3schools.com/vbscript/func_setlocale.asp

Steve
Jan 9 '08 #9

P: n/a
Although setting the locale via VB6 code -could- be a potential "fix", I humbly
advice against it as it might make more enemies than friends. One's app
should adapt the locale setting, NOT the locale setting to the app.

Saga
--

"Dooza" <st*****@SPAM.dooza.tvwrote in message news:O8*************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
fniles wrote:
>On my machine in the office I change the computer setting to English (UK) so the date format is
dd/mm/yyyy instead of mm/dd/yyyy for US.
This problem happens in either Access or SQL Server.
In the database I have a table with Date/time column. The database is located on a machine that
is set to dd/mm/yyyy also.
When I enter date 7/1/08 (as in January 7, 2008), it stores it in the database as 1/7/08 instead
of 7/1/08. Why is it like that and how can I make the database stores it as 7/1/08 ?
Thank you.

Would setting the locale help?
Not sure if your using VBScript, but here is something about it:
http://www.w3schools.com/vbscript/func_setlocale.asp

Steve

Jan 9 '08 #10

P: n/a
Thank you everyone.

So, both the client machine and the server where the ASP is running
and where the database is located are set to UK setting. I inserted
Jan 8, 08 (8/1/08) to the database, and after retrieving the value
back from the database, I use the functions Day and Month, and they
return wrong day and month.

ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.CursorType = adOpenKeyset
rs.LockType = adLockOptimistic
rs.Source = sSql
rs.Open
rs("colDate") = cdate("8/1/08")
rs.update
:
ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs2 = dbConnection.Execute(sSQL)
if not (rs2.EOF) then
date3 = rs2("DATA_DATE")
sDay = day(date3) -->>>RETURNS 1, where it suppose to
return 8
sMonth = month(date3) ->>>RETURNS 8 (August), where it
suppose to return 1 (January)
end if

On Jan 9, 10:18*am, "Saga" <antiS...@somewhere.comwrote:
Inline

Saga

--

<fiefie.niles...@SPAMMEgmail.comwrote in message

news:45**********************************@v4g2000h sf.googlegroups.com...
Thank you everybody.
It turns out that in VB it works fine, but it does not work in ASP.
The data type of the column is truly a "date/time" column in Access
and "Datetime" column in SQL Server.

I do need the date to be stored in the correct format in the database,
because in my ASP program I do the following:
sDay = day(d)
sMonth = month(d)
sYear = year(d)
If it is not stored correctly in the database, the above functions do
not return the correct values.

It seems to work when I do the following (it stores 8/1/08 in the
database)
ssql = "update myTBL set colDate = format('8/1/08','dd/mm/yy') *where
ID = 1"

***Reply***
That format statement just does not look right. Use 4 digits for year
and yyyy-mm-dd format. Using dd/mm/yy will cause problems.
***

Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.open ssql

But when I do the following, it stores 1/8/08 in the database:
ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.CursorType = adOpenKeyset
rs.LockType = adLockOptimistic
rs.Source = sSql
rs.Open
rs("colDate") = cdate(#8/1/08#)
'--got the same result when i do rs("colDate") = cdate("8/1/08")

***Reply***
When specifying a literal date (#8/1/08#) VB always expects mm/dd/yyyy
format. So the above will be interpreted as Aug 1st, 2008. The CDate(##)
statement above is useless since you are in effect converting a date into
a date.

On the other hand, cdate("8/1/08") is converting the string "8/1/08"into a
date which is a step in the right direction, but it is still not 100% "safe":

"CDate recognizes date formats according to the locale setting of your
system." - MSDN Library

I did the following in the immediate window:

? cdate("8/1/08")
08/01/2008 *(2nd) *8th of Jan
8/1/2008 * * (1st) * Aug 1st

I set my regional settings to English US for the 1st try. I then set the
regional settings to English UK for the 2nd test. Note how the "same" date
was displayed, but is intepreted differently depending on locale. Best to stay
away from having dates in strings and using these to update tables or do
further date calculations where the month and day could be ambiguous.

I did another test (in the immediate wndow):

? #8/1/2008#
8/1/2008 * *US setting *Aug 1st 2008
01/08/2008 * UK setting *1st of Aug 2008 * Same date!!!

Note how the above literal is interpreted as the same date but when displayed
it is done using the correct locale format. As mentioned before, when the #
char is used to specify a date literal it is always interpreted as mm/dd/yyyy.
***

rs.Update
rs.close
set rs = nothing

I could use the "update" command on the 1st method, but I would like
to use the 2nd method if possible. Is it possible to make the 2nd
method above work ?
Thank you.

***PS: I have no idea why the OP's text was not indented with the ">"
char. It seems to have been only for this message.

On Jan 8, 5:41 pm, "MikeD" <nob...@nowhere.eduwrote:
"fniles" <fni...@pfmail.comwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
On my machine in the office I change the computer setting to English (UK)
so the date format is dd/mm/yyyy instead of mm/dd/yyyy for US.
This problem happens in either Access or SQL Server.
In the database I have a table with Date/time column. The database is
located on a machine that is set to dd/mm/yyyy also.
When I enter date 7/1/08 (as in January 7, 2008), it stores it in the
database as 1/7/08 instead of 7/1/08. Why is it like that and how can I
make the database stores it as 7/1/08 ?
If the data type of the column is truly one of the various "date" data
types, the format of the date is irrelevant. Don't worry about it.
However, if the data type is actually text or characters, then you've got a
huge problem.
--
Mike
Microsoft MVP Visual Basic- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Jan 10 '08 #11

P: n/a
<fi**********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:f6**********************************@z17g2000 hsg.googlegroups.com...
>>
Thank you everyone.

So, both the client machine and the server where the ASP is running
and where the database is located are set to UK setting. I inserted
Jan 8, 08 (8/1/08) to the database, and after retrieving the value
back from the database, I use the functions Day and Month, and they
return wrong day and month.

ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.CursorType = adOpenKeyset
rs.LockType = adLockOptimistic
rs.Source = sSql
rs.Open
rs("colDate") = cdate("8/1/08")
rs.update
:
ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs2 = dbConnection.Execute(sSQL)
if not (rs2.EOF) then
date3 = rs2("DATA_DATE")
sDay = day(date3) -->>>RETURNS 1, where it suppose to
return 8
sMonth = month(date3) ->>>RETURNS 8 (August), where it
suppose to return 1 (January)
end if
<<
Did you try this:-

Dim dat : dat = CDate("8/1/08")

Response.Write Day(dat) & "<br />"
Response.Write Month(dat)
What happens? As has been pointed out at least twice in this thread already
the locale does not impact a date value, it only impacts the conversion to
and from a string.

However Locales in ASP can be tricky. Locale settings are configured at the
user level. Assuming you're only accessing the website as an anonymous
user, the user's locale settings you would be interested in would be the
IUSR_<machinename>. Since this user is unlikely to have a profile on the
machine the DEFAULT user profile will be used to find the locale settings.
Once the locale settings are loaded they are cached by IIS.

Hence it is possible to make 'changes' to the locale but not affect the
settings in the DEFAULT profile which would have initially been set when the
OS was installed. Its a common problem in the UK where Windows has been
installed with the default US settings. What OS is the web site installed
on?

Personally I would avoid the xx/xx/[xx]xx format altogether. I tend to use
01 Jan 2008 style. This is acceptable to a human and is parsable by
VB(Script), Javascript and SQL Server (I would guess Access would have no
problem with it either).
--
Anthony Jones - MVP ASP/ASP.NET
Jan 10 '08 #12

P: n/a
Please. Stop trying to force a particular format when inserting data into
databases. Databases do not store format. They store numeric
recpresentations of dates. Access stores date/times as Doubles, with the
whole number portion representing the number of days since the seed date and
the decimal portion representing the time (.0 = midnight, .5 = noon). SQL
Server stores datetimes as paired integers, with the first integer
containing the number of days since the seed date, and the second containing
the number of milliseconds since midnight.

You must remember that ASP (IIS) is not running under your user account, so
just because _you_ have your regional settings set to UK, that does not mean
the account that IIS is using has that setting, which defaults to US.

Instead of cdate("8/1/08"), I suggest you use dateserial(2008,1,8).

Explicitly format the dates you retrieve from the database instead of
depending on the operating system to do it for you. If you want to make sure
dates are displayed in UK format, use the Year(), Day() and Month()
functions to build a string containing the correct format which you display
to your users.

Also, instead of using a recordset to maintain data, I suggest using a
parameterized sql statement so you do not need to worry about delimiters. In
vbscript, this would look like:

ssql = "update table set coldate=? where ID = 1"
dim cmd, arParms
arParms = array(dateserial(2008,1,8))
set cmd=createobject("adodb.command")
set cmd.activeconnection = dbConnection
cmd.commandetype = 1 'adCmdText
cmd.commandtext = ssql
cmd.execute ,arParms,128 'adExecuteNoRecords

This should work regardless of the backend database.

fi**********@gmail.com wrote:
Thank you everyone.

So, both the client machine and the server where the ASP is running
and where the database is located are set to UK setting. I inserted
Jan 8, 08 (8/1/08) to the database, and after retrieving the value
back from the database, I use the functions Day and Month, and they
return wrong day and month.

ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.CursorType = adOpenKeyset
rs.LockType = adLockOptimistic
rs.Source = sSql
rs.Open
rs("colDate") = cdate("8/1/08")
rs.update
>>
ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs2 = dbConnection.Execute(sSQL)
if not (rs2.EOF) then
date3 = rs2("DATA_DATE")
sDay = day(date3) -->>>RETURNS 1, where it suppose to
return 8
sMonth = month(date3) ->>>RETURNS 8 (August), where it
suppose to return 1 (January)
end if

On Jan 9, 10:18 am, "Saga" <antiS...@somewhere.comwrote:
>Inline

Saga

--

<fiefie.niles...@SPAMMEgmail.comwrote in message

news:45**********************************@v4g2000 hsf.googlegroups.com...
Thank you everybody.
It turns out that in VB it works fine, but it does not work in ASP.
The data type of the column is truly a "date/time" column in Access
and "Datetime" column in SQL Server.

I do need the date to be stored in the correct format in the
database, because in my ASP program I do the following:
sDay = day(d)
sMonth = month(d)
sYear = year(d)
If it is not stored correctly in the database, the above functions do
not return the correct values.

It seems to work when I do the following (it stores 8/1/08 in the
database)
ssql = "update myTBL set colDate = format('8/1/08','dd/mm/yy') where
ID = 1"

***Reply***
That format statement just does not look right. Use 4 digits for year
and yyyy-mm-dd format. Using dd/mm/yy will cause problems.
***

Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.open ssql

But when I do the following, it stores 1/8/08 in the database:
ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.CursorType = adOpenKeyset
rs.LockType = adLockOptimistic
rs.Source = sSql
rs.Open
rs("colDate") = cdate(#8/1/08#)
'--got the same result when i do rs("colDate") = cdate("8/1/08")

***Reply***
When specifying a literal date (#8/1/08#) VB always expects
mm/dd/yyyy format. So the above will be interpreted as Aug 1st,
2008. The CDate(##) statement above is useless since you are in
effect converting a date into
a date.

On the other hand, cdate("8/1/08") is converting the string
"8/1/08"into a date which is a step in the right direction, but it
is still not 100% "safe":

"CDate recognizes date formats according to the locale setting of
your system." - MSDN Library

I did the following in the immediate window:

? cdate("8/1/08")
08/01/2008 (2nd) 8th of Jan
8/1/2008 (1st) Aug 1st

I set my regional settings to English US for the 1st try. I then set
the regional settings to English UK for the 2nd test. Note how the
"same" date was displayed, but is intepreted differently depending
on locale. Best to stay away from having dates in strings and using
these to update tables or do further date calculations where the
month and day could be ambiguous.

I did another test (in the immediate wndow):

? #8/1/2008#
8/1/2008 US setting Aug 1st 2008
01/08/2008 UK setting 1st of Aug 2008 Same date!!!

Note how the above literal is interpreted as the same date but when
displayed it is done using the correct locale format. As mentioned
before, when the # char is used to specify a date literal it is
always interpreted as mm/dd/yyyy. ***

rs.Update
rs.close
set rs = nothing

I could use the "update" command on the 1st method, but I would like
to use the 2nd method if possible. Is it possible to make the 2nd
method above work ?
Thank you.

***PS: I have no idea why the OP's text was not indented with the ">"
char. It seems to have been only for this message.

On Jan 8, 5:41 pm, "MikeD" <nob...@nowhere.eduwrote:
>>"fniles" <fni...@pfmail.comwrote in message
>>news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl.. .
>>>On my machine in the office I change the computer setting to
English (UK) so the date format is dd/mm/yyyy instead of
mm/dd/yyyy for US.
This problem happens in either Access or SQL Server.
In the database I have a table with Date/time column. The database
is located on a machine that is set to dd/mm/yyyy also.
When I enter date 7/1/08 (as in January 7, 2008), it stores it in
the database as 1/7/08 instead of 7/1/08. Why is it like that and
how can I make the database stores it as 7/1/08 ?
>>If the data type of the column is truly one of the various "date"
data types, the format of the date is irrelevant. Don't worry about
it.
>>However, if the data type is actually text or characters, then
you've got a huge problem.
>>--
Mike
Microsoft MVP Visual Basic- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
--
Microsoft MVP - ASP/ASP.NET
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don't check it very often. If you must reply off-line, then remove the
"NO SPAM"
Jan 10 '08 #13

P: n/a
Anthony Jones wrote:
Personally I would avoid the xx/xx/[xx]xx format altogether. I tend
to use 01 Jan 2008 style. This is acceptable to a human and is
parsable by VB(Script), Javascript and SQL Server (I would guess
Access would have no problem with it either).
Actually, it would. Date literals in JetSQL must be passed in US format, or
ISO. Also, a SQL Server instance with French settings would also have a
problem with it.

--
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"NO SPAM"
Jan 10 '08 #14

P: n/a
<fi**********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:f6**********************************@z17g2000 hsg.googlegroups.com...
So, both the client machine and the server where the ASP is running
and where the database is located are set to UK setting. I inserted
Jan 8, 08 (8/1/08) to the database, and after retrieving the value
back from the database, I use the functions Day and Month, and they
return wrong day and month.
rs("colDate") = cdate("8/1/08")
Even if you are sure that the date formats are all UK you should avod
string-to-date conversions. Use #1/8/2008# or DateSerial(2008,1,8)

I also always recommend not using the default names so:
rs.fields("colDate").Value=#1/8/2008#
if not (rs2.EOF) then
date3 = rs2("DATA_DATE")
Why are you setting "colDate" and retrieving "DATA_DATE"?

Jan 10 '08 #15

P: n/a
"Bob Barrows [MVP]" <re******@NOyahoo.SPAMcomwrote in message
news:eq**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
Anthony Jones wrote:
Personally I would avoid the xx/xx/[xx]xx format altogether. I tend
to use 01 Jan 2008 style. This is acceptable to a human and is
parsable by VB(Script), Javascript and SQL Server (I would guess
Access would have no problem with it either).

Actually, it would. Date literals in JetSQL must be passed in US format,
or
ISO. Also, a SQL Server instance with French settings would also have a
problem with it.

I haven't worked with Jet in such a long time I forget how limited it is.
And yes my preference for dd mmm yyyy doesn't work internationally. :(

Unfortunately Javascript doesn't parse an ISO date and the current
implementations of XSL don't know what a date is. For me then dd mmm yyyy
is a very compelling compromise.

--
Anthony Jones - MVP ASP/ASP.NET
Jan 10 '08 #16

P: n/a
Bob Butler wrote on 10 jan 2008 in microsoft.public.inetserver.asp.general:
Even if you are sure that the date formats are all UK you should avod
string-to-date conversions. Use #1/8/2008#
The first of august?

Please no, use:

#2008/1/8#
or DateSerial(2008,1,8)
--
Evertjan.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Jan 10 '08 #17

P: n/a
"Evertjan." <ex**************@interxnl.netwrote in message
news:Xn********************@194.109.133.242...
Bob Butler wrote on 10 jan 2008 in
microsoft.public.inetserver.asp.general:
>Even if you are sure that the date formats are all UK you should avod
string-to-date conversions. Use #1/8/2008#

The first of august?
No, the # format is always #mm/dd/yyyy# so it is consistent regardless of
your locale
Please no, use:

#2008/1/8#
Enter this in VB and press enter:
d=#2008/1/8#
Jan 10 '08 #18

P: n/a
Bob Butler wrote on 10 jan 2008 in
microsoft.public.inetserver.asp.general:
"Evertjan." <ex**************@interxnl.netwrote in message
news:Xn********************@194.109.133.242...
>Bob Butler wrote on 10 jan 2008 in
microsoft.public.inetserver.asp.general:
>>Even if you are sure that the date formats are all UK you should
avod string-to-date conversions. Use #1/8/2008#

The first of august?

No, the # format is always #mm/dd/yyyy# so it is consistent regardless
of your locale
>Please no, use:

#2008/1/8#

Enter this in VB and press enter:
d=#2008/1/8#
Why?

This NG is not about VB.
--
Evertjan.
The Netherlands.
(Please change the x'es to dots in my emailaddress)
Jan 10 '08 #19

P: n/a
Bob Butler wrote:
"Evertjan." <ex**************@interxnl.netwrote in message
news:Xn********************@194.109.133.242...
>Bob Butler wrote on 10 jan 2008 in
microsoft.public.inetserver.asp.general:
>>Even if you are sure that the date formats are all UK you should
avod string-to-date conversions. Use #1/8/2008#

The first of august?

No, the # format is always #mm/dd/yyyy# so it is consistent
regardless of your locale
>Please no, use:

#2008/1/8#

Enter this in VB and press enter:
d=#2008/1/8#
I don't understand the point you're trying to make. I entered this:

?#2000/8/1#

into the Immediate window in VB, pressed enter and it displayed:

8/1/2000

Were you trying to say that VB would reject that format?

PS. newsgroups added back in to the crosspost - not sure why they were
removed
--
Microsoft MVP -- ASP/ASP.NET
Please reply to the newsgroup. The email account listed in my From
header is my spam trap, so I don't check it very often. You will get a
quicker response by posting to the newsgroup.
Jan 10 '08 #20

P: n/a
"Bob Barrows [MVP]" <re******@NOyahoo.SPAMcomwrote in message
news:OK**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
<cut>
>Enter this in VB and press enter:
d=#2008/1/8#

I don't understand the point you're trying to make. I entered this:

?#2000/8/1#

into the Immediate window
Enter the following line of code into a procedure in a VB code window, not
the immediate window

d=#2008/1/8#
Jan 10 '08 #21

P: n/a
MP
wow! that's weird!!!
:-)

"Bob Butler" <no***@nospam.everwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
"Bob Barrows [MVP]" <re******@NOyahoo.SPAMcomwrote in message
news:OK**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
<cut>
>>Enter this in VB and press enter:
d=#2008/1/8#

I don't understand the point you're trying to make. I entered this:

?#2000/8/1#

into the Immediate window

Enter the following line of code into a procedure in a VB code window, not
the immediate window

d=#2008/1/8#


Jan 10 '08 #22

P: n/a
Bob Butler wrote:
"Bob Barrows [MVP]" <re******@NOyahoo.SPAMcomwrote in message
news:OK**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
<cut>
>>Enter this in VB and press enter:
d=#2008/1/8#

I don't understand the point you're trying to make. I entered this:

?#2000/8/1#

into the Immediate window

Enter the following line of code into a procedure in a VB code
window, not the immediate window

d=#2008/1/8#
Oh, I see. The IDE "helps" you out by turning it into:

d = #1/8/2008#

:-) You could have just told us this instead of making someone (ok, me
<grin>) go to the trouble of finding it out.

Given that the immediate window accepts the y/m/d format, it seems to me
that the compiler would as well.
To test that, I opened the frm file in Notepad, entered the date in
y/m/d format, saved and closed it, compiled and ran the project, which
ran with no problem. Reopened the frm file which still had the date in
y/m/d format, so the compiler seems to have no problem with this date
format.

Given that, if I was still using VB, I would be averse to developing
with Notepad, I guess I would stick with the m/d/y format myself (or
train myself to always use dateserial).

--
Microsoft MVP -- ASP/ASP.NET
Please reply to the newsgroup. The email account listed in my From
header is my spam trap, so I don't check it very often. You will get a
quicker response by posting to the newsgroup.
Jan 10 '08 #23

P: n/a

As I said, VB expects mm/dd/yyyy when a date is used as a literal. It just "helps"
you out by rearranging the numbers to conform to this format, in this case correctly
interpreting the typed in yyyy/mm/dd format <g>

Saga
--

"MP" <No****@Thanks.comwrote in message news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
wow! that's weird!!!
:-)

"Bob Butler" <no***@nospam.everwrote in message news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>"Bob Barrows [MVP]" <re******@NOyahoo.SPAMcomwrote in message
news:OK**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
<cut>
>>>Enter this in VB and press enter:
d=#2008/1/8#

I don't understand the point you're trying to make. I entered this:

?#2000/8/1#

into the Immediate window

Enter the following line of code into a procedure in a VB code window, not the immediate window

d=#2008/1/8#



Jan 10 '08 #24

P: n/a
"Bob Barrows [MVP]" <re******@NOyahoo.SPAMcomwrote in message
news:uF**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
<cut>
Oh, I see. The IDE "helps" you out by turning it into:

d = #1/8/2008#

:-) You could have just told us this instead of making someone (ok, me
<grin>) go to the trouble of finding it out.
If I'd just told you you wouldn't have believed me anyway! <g>

The # delimiters define a date in #m/d/yyyy# format when used in code
regardless of locale. That lets you copy & paste code between
projects/users without worrying about the local format. If you use
"m/d/yyyy" or "d/m/yyyy" then the same code could behave very differently on
different systems.

For anything where the developers are not likely to be US-centric using
DateSerial is a good option, if a tad more overhead, since it's not likely
to be misread by somebody more used to the d/m/yyyy format.

Jan 10 '08 #25

P: n/a
OK, I think I got confused before.
We have all the ASP pages and SQL Server database in the US, and people who
use our application can be in the US and abroad (like Europe) where the date
setting is dd/mm/yy.
Please let me know if I am thinking in the correct direction.
When a US user enter date they will enter 1/10/08 for January 10, 08. When
they do that I can simply save 10/1/08 in the database.
When a non US user (whose date format is dd/mm/yy) enter date they will
enter 10/1/08 for Jan 10, 2008. When they do that, before saving it to the
database I need to convert 10/1/08 to 1/10/08 so that I will store 1/10/08
to the database.
Is there a VB/VBScript function that I can call to find out the date format
of the user ? Or, can I use the GetLocale function ?

Thank you.

"Bob Barrows [MVP]" <re******@NOyahoo.SPAMcomwrote in message
news:Op**************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
Please. Stop trying to force a particular format when inserting data into
databases. Databases do not store format. They store numeric
recpresentations of dates. Access stores date/times as Doubles, with the
whole number portion representing the number of days since the seed date
and the decimal portion representing the time (.0 = midnight, .5 = noon).
SQL Server stores datetimes as paired integers, with the first integer
containing the number of days since the seed date, and the second
containing the number of milliseconds since midnight.

You must remember that ASP (IIS) is not running under your user account,
so just because _you_ have your regional settings set to UK, that does not
mean the account that IIS is using has that setting, which defaults to US.

Instead of cdate("8/1/08"), I suggest you use dateserial(2008,1,8).

Explicitly format the dates you retrieve from the database instead of
depending on the operating system to do it for you. If you want to make
sure dates are displayed in UK format, use the Year(), Day() and Month()
functions to build a string containing the correct format which you
display to your users.

Also, instead of using a recordset to maintain data, I suggest using a
parameterized sql statement so you do not need to worry about delimiters.
In vbscript, this would look like:

ssql = "update table set coldate=? where ID = 1"
dim cmd, arParms
arParms = array(dateserial(2008,1,8))
set cmd=createobject("adodb.command")
set cmd.activeconnection = dbConnection
cmd.commandetype = 1 'adCmdText
cmd.commandtext = ssql
cmd.execute ,arParms,128 'adExecuteNoRecords

This should work regardless of the backend database.

fi**********@gmail.com wrote:
>Thank you everyone.

So, both the client machine and the server where the ASP is running
and where the database is located are set to UK setting. I inserted
Jan 8, 08 (8/1/08) to the database, and after retrieving the value
back from the database, I use the functions Day and Month, and they
return wrong day and month.

ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.CursorType = adOpenKeyset
rs.LockType = adLockOptimistic
rs.Source = sSql
rs.Open
rs("colDate") = cdate("8/1/08")
rs.update
>>>
ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs2 = dbConnection.Execute(sSQL)
if not (rs2.EOF) then
date3 = rs2("DATA_DATE")
sDay = day(date3) -->>>RETURNS 1, where it suppose to
return 8
sMonth = month(date3) ->>>RETURNS 8 (August), where it
suppose to return 1 (January)
end if

On Jan 9, 10:18 am, "Saga" <antiS...@somewhere.comwrote:
>>Inline

Saga

--

<fiefie.niles...@SPAMMEgmail.comwrote in message

news:45**********************************@v4g200 0hsf.googlegroups.com...
Thank you everybody.
It turns out that in VB it works fine, but it does not work in ASP.
The data type of the column is truly a "date/time" column in Access
and "Datetime" column in SQL Server.

I do need the date to be stored in the correct format in the
database, because in my ASP program I do the following:
sDay = day(d)
sMonth = month(d)
sYear = year(d)
If it is not stored correctly in the database, the above functions do
not return the correct values.

It seems to work when I do the following (it stores 8/1/08 in the
database)
ssql = "update myTBL set colDate = format('8/1/08','dd/mm/yy') where
ID = 1"

***Reply***
That format statement just does not look right. Use 4 digits for year
and yyyy-mm-dd format. Using dd/mm/yy will cause problems.
***

Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.open ssql

But when I do the following, it stores 1/8/08 in the database:
ssql = "select * from myTBL where ID = 1"
Set rs = Server.CreateObject("ADODB.Recordset")
rs.ActiveConnection = dbConnection
rs.CursorType = adOpenKeyset
rs.LockType = adLockOptimistic
rs.Source = sSql
rs.Open
rs("colDate") = cdate(#8/1/08#)
'--got the same result when i do rs("colDate") = cdate("8/1/08")

***Reply***
When specifying a literal date (#8/1/08#) VB always expects
mm/dd/yyyy format. So the above will be interpreted as Aug 1st,
2008. The CDate(##) statement above is useless since you are in
effect converting a date into
a date.

On the other hand, cdate("8/1/08") is converting the string
"8/1/08"into a date which is a step in the right direction, but it
is still not 100% "safe":

"CDate recognizes date formats according to the locale setting of
your system." - MSDN Library

I did the following in the immediate window:

? cdate("8/1/08")
08/01/2008 (2nd) 8th of Jan
8/1/2008 (1st) Aug 1st

I set my regional settings to English US for the 1st try. I then set
the regional settings to English UK for the 2nd test. Note how the
"same" date was displayed, but is intepreted differently depending
on locale. Best to stay away from having dates in strings and using
these to update tables or do further date calculations where the
month and day could be ambiguous.

I did another test (in the immediate wndow):

? #8/1/2008#
8/1/2008 US setting Aug 1st 2008
01/08/2008 UK setting 1st of Aug 2008 Same date!!!

Note how the above literal is interpreted as the same date but when
displayed it is done using the correct locale format. As mentioned
before, when the # char is used to specify a date literal it is
always interpreted as mm/dd/yyyy. ***

rs.Update
rs.close
set rs = nothing

I could use the "update" command on the 1st method, but I would like
to use the 2nd method if possible. Is it possible to make the 2nd
method above work ?
Thank you.

***PS: I have no idea why the OP's text was not indented with the ">"
char. It seems to have been only for this message.

On Jan 8, 5:41 pm, "MikeD" <nob...@nowhere.eduwrote:

"fniles" <fni...@pfmail.comwrote in message

news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl. ..

On my machine in the office I change the computer setting to
English (UK) so the date format is dd/mm/yyyy instead of
mm/dd/yyyy for US.
This problem happens in either Access or SQL Server.
In the database I have a table with Date/time column. The database
is located on a machine that is set to dd/mm/yyyy also.
When I enter date 7/1/08 (as in January 7, 2008), it stores it in
the database as 1/7/08 instead of 7/1/08. Why is it like that and
how can I make the database stores it as 7/1/08 ?

If the data type of the column is truly one of the various "date"
data types, the format of the date is irrelevant. Don't worry about
it.

However, if the data type is actually text or characters, then
you've got a huge problem.

--
Mike
Microsoft MVP Visual Basic- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -

--
Microsoft MVP - ASP/ASP.NET
Please reply to the newsgroup. This email account is my spam trap so I
don't check it very often. If you must reply off-line, then remove the
"NO SPAM"

Jan 10 '08 #26

P: n/a
"fniles" <fn****@pfmail.comwrote in message
news:ue**************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
OK, I think I got confused before.
We have all the ASP pages and SQL Server database in the US, and people
who use our application can be in the US and abroad (like Europe) where
the date setting is dd/mm/yy.
Please let me know if I am thinking in the correct direction.
When a US user enter date they will enter 1/10/08
No, they won't. users should be using some sort of calendar control or combo
box or other such methods of specifying a date so that there is no question
about it. Never accept date values in a text field.

For display you can always use something like "mmm d, yyyy" that everybody
will at least understand to mean the same thing.

Jan 10 '08 #27

P: n/a
No, they won't
Did you mean there is function to get the user's date setting ?

"Bob Butler" <no***@nospam.everwrote in message
news:uq**************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
"fniles" <fn****@pfmail.comwrote in message
news:ue**************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
>OK, I think I got confused before.
We have all the ASP pages and SQL Server database in the US, and people
who use our application can be in the US and abroad (like Europe) where
the date setting is dd/mm/yy.
Please let me know if I am thinking in the correct direction.
When a US user enter date they will enter 1/10/08

No, they won't. users should be using some sort of calendar control or
combo box or other such methods of specifying a date so that there is no
question about it. Never accept date values in a text field.

For display you can always use something like "mmm d, yyyy" that everybody
will at least understand to mean the same thing.

Jan 10 '08 #28

P: n/a
"fniles" <fn****@pfmail.comwrote in message
news:OU**************@TK2MSFTNGP05.phx.gbl...
>No, they won't
Did you mean there is function to get the user's date setting ?

No, I mean that users won't "enter 1/10/08" since they won't be entering a
date in a textbox. They'll be using combo boxes or clicking on a calendar
or some other such method. You don't want to get yourself into the position
where you have to know what the user's preferred date format is.

Jan 10 '08 #29

P: n/a
fniles wrote:
>No, they won't
Did you mean there is function to get the user's date setting ?
No. He means that the developer of the page that accepts the user's
input should not use a textbox to solicit dates from the user. Instead,
use " ... some sort of calendar control or combo box or other such
methods of specifying a date so that there is no question about it"

Of course, there is no such thing as a combo box in html: you could use
three cascading dropdown boxes (you would want the days dropdown to vary
depending on the year and month selected). The idea is to pass an
unambiguous year, month and day to the server.

But these are client-side html/scripting issues that are out of the
scope of this asp group which is focussed on server-side problems.

For html questions see:
http://groups.google.com/groups/dir?sel=33584039

For client-side scripting questions, go to
microsoft.public.scripting.jscript or comp.lang.javascript

--
Microsoft MVP -- ASP/ASP.NET
Please reply to the newsgroup. The email account listed in my From
header is my spam trap, so I don't check it very often. You will get a
quicker response by posting to the newsgroup.
Jan 10 '08 #30

P: n/a
"Bob Barrows [MVP]" <re******@NOyahoo.SPAMcomwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
Of course, there is no such thing as a combo box in html:
right, I rarely use a VB combobox for anything other than a drop-down list
and sometimes use the term too loosely.
Jan 11 '08 #31

This discussion thread is closed

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