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RunTime For Dummies?

P: n/a

I have a PDA-based (Syware Visual CE) database which I need to sync to
an Access database. The Access database contains three tables: 1 is
the data itself, 2 is a linked table that prefills several fields in
the main data table based on the value of one of it's fields, and 3 is
table the PDA database creates to sync cases. I've been using Access
2003 until now. I need to be able to distribute the Access database
and PDA database to users who may not have Access. Therefore I want
to use Access2007 w/ the free runtime module to create runtime
versions of the database for distribution.

I've installed Access 2007 on a computer and downloaded and installed
the free runtime module. I have no experience with 2007 other than to
open the 2003 database that we *had* been using, convert and save as
an accdb database. I understand that I have a choice of saving as mdb
or accdb, but I haven't figured out how to save as mdb.

Can anyone answer any of the following questions?

-Do I need to install anything else besides the AccessRuntime.exe?

-Does anyone see a potential advantage or disadvantage to using either
an accdb or mdb database?

-How do you save an Access2007 databas as an mdb? Is it simply a
matter of saving as Access 200-2003? If so, will the 2007 runtime
still work?

-Now that I've installed the runtime how do I save a runtime version
of the database?

-Are there potential problems of using the runtime on computers with
an earlier version of Access installed?

I'm sure this stuff is simple for people who do it a lot but I've not
had experience with 2007 or developer toolkit issues before. I've
looked for instructions and get the feeling that it's going to take a
couple days to figure it out on my own and at the moment I don't have
a couple days to spare. I had kinda hoped it would be as simple as
installing the runtime, converting the 2003 database and clicking
something that says "create runtime version."

Can anyone talk a newbie through the basics?

Many thanks,
-Scott

Aug 22 '07 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a

I guess no body *does* want to help a newbie. :) That, or not enough
people here have dealt with this to know the answer. Anyone have any
other suggestions for where to post such a question?

Thanks,
-Scott

On Aug 22, 9:25 am, SMcK <NPi...@gmail.comwrote:
I have a PDA-based (Syware Visual CE) database which I need to sync to
an Access database. The Access database contains three tables: 1 is
the data itself, 2 is a linked table that prefills several fields in
the main data table based on the value of one of it's fields, and 3 is
table the PDA database creates to sync cases. I've been using Access
2003 until now. I need to be able to distribute the Access database
and PDA database to users who may not have Access. Therefore I want
to use Access2007 w/ the free runtime module to create runtime
versions of the database for distribution.

I've installed Access 2007 on a computer and downloaded and installed
the free runtime module. I have no experience with 2007 other than to
open the 2003 database that we *had* been using, convert and save as
an accdb database. I understand that I have a choice of saving as mdb
or accdb, but I haven't figured out how to save as mdb.

Can anyone answer any of the following questions?

-Do I need to install anything else besides the AccessRuntime.exe?

-Does anyone see a potential advantage or disadvantage to using either
an accdb or mdb database?

-How do you save an Access2007 databas as an mdb? Is it simply a
matter of saving as Access 200-2003? If so, will the 2007 runtime
still work?

-Now that I've installed the runtime how do I save a runtime version
of the database?

-Are there potential problems of using the runtime on computers with
an earlier version of Access installed?

I'm sure this stuff is simple for people who do it a lot but I've not
had experience with 2007 or developer toolkit issues before. I've
looked for instructions and get the feeling that it's going to take a
couple days to figure it out on my own and at the moment I don't have
a couple days to spare. I had kinda hoped it would be as simple as
installing the runtime, converting the 2003 database and clicking
something that says "create runtime version."

Can anyone talk a newbie through the basics?

Many thanks,
-Scott

Aug 22 '07 #2

P: n/a
On Aug 22, 5:12 pm, SMcK <NPi...@gmail.comwrote:
I guess no body *does* want to help a newbie. :) That, or not enough
people here have dealt with this to know the answer. Anyone have any
other suggestions for where to post such a question?

Thanks,
-Scott

On Aug 22, 9:25 am, SMcK <NPi...@gmail.comwrote:
I have a PDA-based (Syware Visual CE) database which I need to sync to
anAccessdatabase. TheAccessdatabase contains three tables: 1 is
the data itself, 2 is a linked table that prefills several fields in
the main data table based on the value of one of it's fields, and 3 is
table the PDA database creates to sync cases. I've been usingAccess
2003 until now. I need to be able to distribute theAccessdatabase
and PDA database to users who may not haveAccess. Therefore I want
to use Access2007 w/ the free runtime module to create runtime
versions of the database for distribution.
I've installedAccess2007on a computer and downloaded and installed
the free runtime module. I have no experience with2007other than to
open the 2003 database that we *had* been using, convert and save as
an accdb database. I understand that I have a choice of saving as mdb
or accdb, but I haven't figured out how to save as mdb.
Can anyone answer any of the following questions?
-Do I need to install anything else besides the AccessRuntime.exe?
-Does anyone see a potential advantage or disadvantage to using either
an accdb or mdb database?
-How do you save an Access2007 databas as an mdb? Is it simply a
matter of saving asAccess200-2003? If so, will the2007runtime
still work?
-Now that I've installed the runtime how do I save a runtime version
of the database?
-Are there potential problems of using the runtime on computers with
an earlier version ofAccessinstalled?
I'm sure this stuff is simple for people who do it a lot but I've not
had experience with2007or developertoolkitissues before. I've
looked for instructions and get the feeling that it's going to take a
couple days to figure it out on my own and at the moment I don't have
a couple days to spare. I had kinda hoped it would be as simple as
installing the runtime, converting the 2003 database and clicking
something that says "create runtime version."
Can anyone talk a newbie through the basics?
Many thanks,
-Scott
Scott
I don't have Access 2007 but I'm thinking of getting it.
I'm still working with Access 97. I have the developer edition with
runtime and the ODE setup wizard.
I've been poking around the news groups to try to get a handle on what
the 2007 version is like specifically with regard to distributing the
runtime.
I am intrigued with your comment about downloading the free runtime
module.
For Access 2003 you had to purchase Visual Studio Tools (@ $1000.00)
to get the the developer toolkit with runtime license and ADE's. Has
this changed for 2007?
Do I take it that you were able to obtain the whole developer toolkit
separately?
Or does it, or most of it come with Office/Access 2007?
If so that would be sweet.
Well, it would actually be about time.
There have been plenty of negative posts regarding MS making Access
developers buy a mostly useless (to them) and expensive suite of
programs just to get the developer toolkit for Access 2003 especially
since it used to be included with earlier versions of Office.
Perhaps some of the regular MVP contributors could shed some light on
this for me.
Thank you

Aug 23 '07 #3

P: n/a
<lg********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11*********************@l22g2000prc.googlegro ups.com...
Scott
I don't have Access 2007 but I'm thinking of getting it.
I'm still working with Access 97. I have the developer edition with
runtime and the ODE setup wizard.
I've been poking around the news groups to try to get a handle on what
the 2007 version is like specifically with regard to distributing the
runtime.
I am intrigued with your comment about downloading the free runtime
module.
For Access 2003 you had to purchase Visual Studio Tools (@ $1000.00)
to get the the developer toolkit with runtime license and ADE's. Has
this changed for 2007?
Do I take it that you were able to obtain the whole developer toolkit
separately?
Or does it, or most of it come with Office/Access 2007?
If so that would be sweet.
Well, it would actually be about time.
There have been plenty of negative posts regarding MS making Access
developers buy a mostly useless (to them) and expensive suite of
programs just to get the developer toolkit for Access 2003 especially
since it used to be included with earlier versions of Office.
Perhaps some of the regular MVP contributors could shed some light on
this for me.
Thank you
For 2007 it's all free for download.

Whether it works worth the price I can't say.

--
Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
Email (as appropriate) to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
Aug 23 '07 #4

P: n/a
"SMcK" <NP****@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@g4g2000hsf.googlegro ups.com...
>
I have a PDA-based (Syware Visual CE) database which I need to sync to
an Access database. The Access database contains three tables: 1 is
the data itself, 2 is a linked table that prefills several fields in
the main data table based on the value of one of it's fields, and 3 is
table the PDA database creates to sync cases. I've been using Access
2003 until now. I need to be able to distribute the Access database
and PDA database to users who may not have Access. Therefore I want
to use Access2007 w/ the free runtime module to create runtime
versions of the database for distribution.
You have to check if your software supports the use of a2007 with that
"sync" software. don't assume it will.
I've installed Access 2007 on a computer and downloaded and installed
the free runtime module. I have no experience with 2007 other than to
open the 2003 database that we *had* been using, convert and save as
an accdb database. I understand that I have a choice of saving as mdb
or accdb, but I haven't figured out how to save as mdb.
The process of converting to a "previews" version, such as using a2003 to
create a access 97 mdb file is the same. In a2003, you simple open the
database, and then go:

tools->database utilities->convent database->

So, you had that ability in a2003 (as always, lots to learn in a2003
also!!).
-Do I need to install anything else besides the AccessRuntime.exe?
Not really. However, even with a2003, I sure you always provided shortcut,
provided a custom interface, and hidden the ms-access interface (right?). If
you
looking to deploy applications, then you have hopefully crossed a few of
these bridges. For example, for updates, you MUST be using a spilt
database..right?
-Does anyone see a potential advantage or disadvantage to using either
an accdb or mdb database?
Like the whole computing industry been for the last 20+ years, if you use
new features in word, excel, or this case ms-access then obviously you have
to use the new file format. So, same for excel, word or ms-access. If you
want to
use new features of the product, for the most part, you have to use the new
format.
-How do you save an Access2007 databas as an mdb?
In a2007, they made it is same as the rest of office. So, in place of using
tools-database utilities in a2003, you now can use "save as", and it gives
you the ability to save as a2000 to a2003 formats. (office button, save-as->
you see the list).
Is it simply a
matter of saving as Access 200-2003? If so, will the 2007 runtime
still work?
I would not attempt this unless you have a lot of experience. I been of late
developing on a2003 box for someone that has only a2000. It is *remarkable*
how many bug fixes, and replot issues occur when I move my software
*backwards*. In other words, a2003 is far better then a2000. Many things
that
work great in a2003, don't work well in a2000. I only learned this by
deploying the application, and seeing it not run correct on those a2000
machines.

The bottom line here is that you really need a few months of experience
doing this,
and finding out what works, and what does not.

Do keep in mind that the runtime is not diffent then the full version of
ms-access. Once you install the full version, or the runtime, then it is
simple matter to copy a mdb, or accdb to the target machine.

The a2000 runtime was 150 megs in size, and often required a
re-boot during the install. So, you are installing a large application from
the
office suite, not some tiny little runtime program.

I repeat, there is NO DIFFERENCE in using the runtime except that you need
to
build your own custom interface. However, if you been serious about
building access applications, then you likely hidden the ms-access interface
for years, and been provding custom menus etc for years also. How much you
been doing this in the past is going to reflect on how much work it going to
be for you and using the runtime.
>
-Now that I've installed the runtime how do I save a runtime version
of the database?
You don't save a "runtime" versions. You simply copy your mdb, or mde to the
target machine (once again, I assume again that you for years been using a
mde
in your applications). If you not been using a mde, then I don't think your
ready to deploy applications, and need a few more months of experience using
ms-access. Once the runtime is installed, it just like you have now, you can
double click on the
mdb, and it runs.
>
-Are there potential problems of using the runtime on computers with
an earlier version of Access installed?
Absolute yes. Remember, using the runtime or the full version is not a
difference in terms of the problems you encounter. After all, they are
compatible!!! So, if you install two different full versions of ms-access,
or
two different runtime version of ms-access on the same machine, you going
got
have lots and lots of problems.

If you want you can purchase some commercial scripts and installer that will
reduce this problem. Many of the problems (and pay for solutions) are
outlined here:

www.sagekey.com
Again, the problems are the same with the runtime because it is the same
system as the full system. Only some
menus, and design ability is turned off..but, it really the same large
install).

I'm sure this stuff is simple for people who do it a lot but I've not
had experience with 2007 or developer toolkit issues before.
Well, it not so much having experience with a97, or a2003, or a2007, but it
just a question of your approach. Your looking for shortcuts here, and
software don't work that way. You need experience running this stuff. You
can't jump to a whole new version of ms-access,and not have a learning
curve. You need to run and test and develop your application for a good
month or so on the new version.

I remember when I converted from a97 to a2003. It took a good month or so to
really get up to speed, and learn the differences. The jump to a2007 is even
larger...

So, I can't imagine any self respecting developer not spending a good month,
or
two using a2007 on a daily basis to develop and test your application. Then,
and
only then can you consider the runtime, and deploying this application to
your
users.
>
Can anyone talk a newbie through the basics?
Do you use split databases now? You should, I explain this here:

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...plit/index.htm
Have you been deploying mde to your users? Again, the above split article
mentions the mde issue.

Using the runtime:

Have you built and been using a hidden interface for a long time, and
users never seen the ms-access part of the application? This issue will
reflect how much work you have to use the runtime.

In my case I had never seen, used the runtime. However since I been
providing
custom menus and interface, then using the runtime was no work for me. I
give some ideas on interface and some screen shots of ms-access here:

http://www.members.shaw.ca/AlbertKal...erFriendly.htm

--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com

Aug 23 '07 #5

P: n/a
On Aug 23, 2:06 pm, "Albert D. Kallal" <PleaseNOOOsPAMmkal...@msn.com>
wrote:
The bottom line here is that you really need a few months of experience
doing this,
and finding out what works, and what does not.
Or at least time enough to read the doco, practise and test.
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb501030.aspx

And get some PCs other than the development machine to test.
Aug 23 '07 #6

P: n/a
On Aug 22, 9:24 pm, "Rick Brandt" <rickbran...@hotmail.comwrote:
<lgeastw...@gmail.comwrote in message

news:11*********************@l22g2000prc.googlegro ups.com...
Scott
I don't have Access 2007 but I'm thinking of getting it.
I'm still working with Access 97. I have the developer edition with
runtime and the ODE setup wizard.
I've been poking around the news groups to try to get a handle on what
the 2007 version is like specifically with regard to distributing the
runtime.
I am intrigued with your comment about downloading the free runtime
module.
For Access 2003 you had to purchase Visual Studio Tools (@ $1000.00)
to get the the developer toolkit with runtime license and ADE's. Has
this changed for 2007?
Do I take it that you were able to obtain the whole developer toolkit
separately?
Or does it, or most of it come with Office/Access 2007?
If so that would be sweet.
Well, it would actually be about time.
There have been plenty of negative posts regarding MS making Access
developers buy a mostly useless (to them) and expensive suite of
programs just to get the developer toolkit for Access 2003 especially
since it used to be included with earlier versions of Office.
Perhaps some of the regular MVP contributors could shed some light on
this for me.
Thank you

For 2007 it's all free for download.

Whether it works worth the price I can't say.

--
Rick Brandt, Microsoft Access MVP
Email (as appropriate) to...
RBrandt at Hunter dot com
Well I upgraded to A2007 and downloaded the runtime & developer
extensions.
My first impression is tentatively positive.
There are several new features (that Albert Kallal lists in another
post in this group) that might make it worth the upgrade.
My A97 app converted without any major problems.
However I can see I have a bit of a learning curve ahead.
And to Rick's comment whether it works worth the price, I'll need to
get some experience at this baby to determine the worth.
I always deployed my A97 app with the runtime included.
All my custom settings (menus etc) worked fine in the rt environment.
I did a test deployment with the new A2007 rt and noticed that db
settings under options (menu choices eg) are not set in the rt.
Security settings as well are not automatically set in the rt. I read
in another post that for this the registry must be manually edited.
If this is the case it sounds like I might have to physically attend
each deployment; something I've rarely done for practical and
logistical reasons.
I would like to continue the practice of distributing an install CD
with little or ideally no support required.
In this respect A07 runtime seems to be lacking at this point.
Does anyone have any experience with this and be able to provide some
tips on seemless (more or less) deployment with A07 rt?
Thanks
Lou
PS
The packager included with ADE works fine but is not, it seems, in
some ways as good as the A97 Setup Wizard.
My app is split and updates are for the ui only. Packager does not
provide overwrite options so I need to create a separate CD to install
the back end. Not a big deal tho.
There is a dialogue to enter registry entries which perhaps would
solve the rt settings.
Unfortunately there is no help link to describe how to enter the
registry info.
Can anyone with some A07 experience shed a bit of light on this?

Sep 5 '07 #7

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