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O.T. - I'm not sure - Anyway, its a sort algorithm question

P: n/a
MLH
Consider an array A(5) consisting of integers 1 through 5 in random
order. 3,1,5,2,4. To make things easier to read, I'll eliminate the
commas. My objective is to sort 31524 to 12345 by moving left-to-right
through the string 31524 examining 2 characters at a time, reversing
them to place the smaller of the two on the left. Initialize
Flip=False. Set to True if any change req'd.

31524 becomes
13524 then Flip=True
13524 becomes
13524 then
13524 becomes
13254 then Flip=True
13254 becomes
13245 And that is one complete pass through the string. Flip=True

Remembering that changes were made in the pass, we'll make one more to
see if NO changes have to be made. Set Flip=False...

13245 becomes
13245 then
13245 becomes
12345 then Flip=True
12345 becomes
12345 then
12345 becomes
12345 And that is the second complete pass through the string.

Remembering that changes were made in the pass (2nd digit pair), we'll
make one more to see if NO changes have to be made. Set Flip=False...

12345 becomes
12345 then
12345 becomes
12345 then
12345 becomes
12345 then
12345 becomes
12345 And that is the 3rd pass thru the string. Flip is still False.

Although the third pass was not required for you and I, a machine
would need to perform this pass to determine that it could complete
the pass without setting Flip to True. There were three Flips in the
first pass, one Flip in the second pass and no Flips in the third
pass. The machine knows it's done when Flip is False at the end
of any pass.

Does this sort algorithm have a name? That is my question.
Dec 2 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
"MLH" <CR**@NorthState.net> wondered:
Does this sort algorithm have a name? That is my question.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_sort
Dec 2 '05 #2

P: n/a
MLH
On Fri, 2 Dec 2005 19:08:11 +0100, "kaniest" <ka*****@xs4all.nl>
wrote:
"MLH" <CR**@NorthState.net> wondered:
Does this sort algorithm have a name? That is my question.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_sort

Many thx, kaniest. One of the LEAST desirable sort methods, I see.
Dec 2 '05 #3

P: n/a
MLH wrote:
On Fri, 2 Dec 2005 19:08:11 +0100, "kaniest" <ka*****@xs4all.nl>
wrote:

"MLH" <CR**@NorthState.net> wondered:
Does this sort algorithm have a name? That is my question.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_sort


Many thx, kaniest. One of the LEAST desirable sort methods, I see.


For 5 elements, do you even care?
Dec 3 '05 #4

P: n/a
>>>
Does this sort algorithm have a name? That is my question.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_sort


Many thx, kaniest. One of the LEAST desirable sort methods, I see.


For 5 elements, do you even care?


If only 5 elements are involved, then bubblesort could do the job perfectly.
However, consider implementing quicksort if the number of elements is much
larger:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quicksort
Dec 5 '05 #5

P: n/a
MLH
I used 5 elements to demonstrate
the sort method in the post only.
Dec 6 '05 #6

P: n/a
MLH <CR**@NorthState.net> wrote in
news:h4********************************@4ax.com:
I used 5 elements to demonstrate
the sort method in the post only.


Even with a 5-element set, I'd implement the sort with the most
efficient sort practical, since you don't know that some day the
number of elements might vastly increase.

--
David W. Fenton http://www.bway.net/~dfenton
dfenton at bway dot net http://www.bway.net/~dfassoc
Dec 6 '05 #7

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