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getting rid of a dodgy query

P: n/a
For some reason i have this dodgy query in my database: ~sq_fM-WEB-SUB

It does not do anything, but I can NOT

- open it
- delete it
- rename it
etc... because according to access, I do not have permission to do so.

Does anyone know a trick to get rid of this nuisance?
Nov 13 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
"WindAndWaves" <ac****@ngaru.com> wrote in message news:<0d********************@news.xtra.co.nz>...
For some reason i have this dodgy query in my database: ~sq_fM-WEB-SUB

It does not do anything, but I can NOT

- open it
- delete it
- rename it
etc... because according to access, I do not have permission to do so.

Does anyone know a trick to get rid of this nuisance?


I thought the ~sq queries were internal. Are you showing hidden
objects or something? I guess you could import everything else into a
new db...
Nov 13 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hi Pieter

Yes, this is the theory, but for some reason this query has shown up and now
it will not leave.

I don't want to import them all to a new database, because I have so many
objects that this takes several hours (believe it or not).

Would there be some kind of trick I could use to delete the bugger?
"Pieter Linden" <pi********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:bf**************************@posting.google.c om...
"WindAndWaves" <ac****@ngaru.com> wrote in message

news:<0d********************@news.xtra.co.nz>...
For some reason i have this dodgy query in my database: ~sq_fM-WEB-SUB

It does not do anything, but I can NOT

- open it
- delete it
- rename it
etc... because according to access, I do not have permission to do so.

Does anyone know a trick to get rid of this nuisance?


I thought the ~sq queries were internal. Are you showing hidden
objects or something? I guess you could import everything else into a
new db...

Nov 13 '05 #3

P: n/a
"WindAndWaves" <ac****@ngaru.com> wrote in message news:<gl********************@news.xtra.co.nz>...
Hi Pieter

Yes, this is the theory, but for some reason this query has shown up and now
it will not leave.

I don't want to import them all to a new database, because I have so many
objects that this takes several hours (believe it or not).

Would there be some kind of trick I could use to delete the bugger?


You're not going to like this, but I *think* (yes, I've been known to
do that on rare occasions!) it's not letting you delete it because
it's a rowsource for a control on one of your forms. Which one and
how to find it, I have no idea. If I remember right, anytime you
build a query in the rowsource of an object, Access makes one of these
funky queries with the weird name and won't let you delete it. You
might need something like SpeedFerret to figure out what's using it,
delete that control and recreate it on the form it's on. (Yeah,
that's the easy part... finding it is the problem!)

Hope this helps some. Anyone else feel free to jump in and tell me
I'm just completely full of bollocks. (But explain what's going on!)

Pieter
Nov 13 '05 #4

P: n/a
You are correct, Pieter.

When you use SQL for the RecordSource of a Form, Access is "smart" enough to
know that it is something that will be relatively frequently used so it
creates an internal "saved query" to optimize retrieval. Deleting that
Access-generated query could (1) slow performance, or (2) be to no avail,
because Access may regenerate it for the same reason that it generated it in
the first place.

It really isn't a good idea to go about, willy-nilly, for people to go about
deleting anything they don't understand. Some of them might, if deleted,
make their database useless. I remember when we had a rash of
inquiries/complaints from people who were very upset that they couldn't
delete "all those tables whose names began with MSys". Fortunately, Access
will not allow you to delete the system tables that are vital to the
operation of the database.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

"Pieter Linden" <pi********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:bf**************************@posting.google.c om...
"WindAndWaves" <ac****@ngaru.com> wrote in message

news:<gl********************@news.xtra.co.nz>...
Hi Pieter

Yes, this is the theory, but for some reason this query has shown up and now it will not leave.

I don't want to import them all to a new database, because I have so many objects that this takes several hours (believe it or not).

Would there be some kind of trick I could use to delete the bugger?


You're not going to like this, but I *think* (yes, I've been known to
do that on rare occasions!) it's not letting you delete it because
it's a rowsource for a control on one of your forms. Which one and
how to find it, I have no idea. If I remember right, anytime you
build a query in the rowsource of an object, Access makes one of these
funky queries with the weird name and won't let you delete it. You
might need something like SpeedFerret to figure out what's using it,
delete that control and recreate it on the form it's on. (Yeah,
that's the easy part... finding it is the problem!)

Hope this helps some. Anyone else feel free to jump in and tell me
I'm just completely full of bollocks. (But explain what's going on!)

Pieter

Nov 13 '05 #5

P: n/a
Hi Guys

Yes, thank you for the comments. I am pretty sure it is an accidentally
left behind kind of query. Because there is only one of them and I has been
forever. I will look into it.

Thank you

Nicolaas
"Larry Linson" <bo*****@localhost.not> wrote in message
news:J5wYc.3561$UI6.110@trnddc08...
You are correct, Pieter.

When you use SQL for the RecordSource of a Form, Access is "smart" enough to know that it is something that will be relatively frequently used so it
creates an internal "saved query" to optimize retrieval. Deleting that
Access-generated query could (1) slow performance, or (2) be to no avail,
because Access may regenerate it for the same reason that it generated it in the first place.

It really isn't a good idea to go about, willy-nilly, for people to go about deleting anything they don't understand. Some of them might, if deleted,
make their database useless. I remember when we had a rash of
inquiries/complaints from people who were very upset that they couldn't
delete "all those tables whose names began with MSys". Fortunately, Access
will not allow you to delete the system tables that are vital to the
operation of the database.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Access MVP

"Pieter Linden" <pi********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:bf**************************@posting.google.c om...
"WindAndWaves" <ac****@ngaru.com> wrote in message news:<gl********************@news.xtra.co.nz>...
Hi Pieter

Yes, this is the theory, but for some reason this query has shown up
and now it will not leave.

I don't want to import them all to a new database, because I have so many objects that this takes several hours (believe it or not).

Would there be some kind of trick I could use to delete the bugger?


You're not going to like this, but I *think* (yes, I've been known to
do that on rare occasions!) it's not letting you delete it because
it's a rowsource for a control on one of your forms. Which one and
how to find it, I have no idea. If I remember right, anytime you
build a query in the rowsource of an object, Access makes one of these
funky queries with the weird name and won't let you delete it. You
might need something like SpeedFerret to figure out what's using it,
delete that control and recreate it on the form it's on. (Yeah,
that's the easy part... finding it is the problem!)

Hope this helps some. Anyone else feel free to jump in and tell me
I'm just completely full of bollocks. (But explain what's going on!)

Pieter


Nov 13 '05 #6

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