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Commercial applications (not library) written in C#

P: n/a
Hello.
This post is not about the C# language itself, but its usage in the
real world. I know a lot of commercial Windows desktop applications.
But actually I don't think any of them is written in C#. Some
applications do use C# but I think it's only a small part, and most of
the codes are written in C++. Is there any commercial application
written entirely (or mainly) in C#? Not .NET GUI components nor any
other libraries for .NET. Not freeware, not enterprise application,
server application, or custom software. I mean general commercial
Windows desktop applications like Microsoft Word, WinRAR and so on .

In fact, I've searched this news group for this subject and found a
post with the same subject, but it was more than two years old. I'd
like to know about current situation. I think Microsoft has been
making efforts to make C# one of the major programming languages for
Windows development.

PS : If there are commercial C# applications, do they all use
obfustication?
Jun 27 '08 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
On Jun 25, 5:42 pm, Sin Jeong-hun <typing...@gmail.comwrote:
This post is not about the C# language itself, but its usage in the
real world. I know a lot of commercial Windows desktop applications.
But actually I don't think any of them is written in C#. Some
applications do use C# but I think it's only a small part, and most of
the codes are written in C++. Is there any commercial application
written entirely (or mainly) in C#? Not .NET GUI components nor any
other libraries for .NET. Not freeware, not enterprise application,
server application, or custom software. I mean general commercial
Windows desktop applications like Microsoft Word, WinRAR and so on .
There are certainly some, although I wouldn't expect many products
with a long history to show up in the list.

From Microsoft:
Windows Live Writer

From a previous employer:
AudaEnterprise (see www.audatex.com and look at the UK) and other
products
PS : If there are commercial C# applications, do they all use
obfustication?
Some use obfuscation, but not all.

Jon
Jun 27 '08 #2

P: n/a
Well, the entire ide for Visual Studio is written in C# according to
Microsoft. A quick google search also said that Powerquest DriveImage
is a dotnet written program. I think the question is somewhat moot,
since the advantage of c++ is that it's so embedded into established
companies' development process and it's also more friendly towards
porting to mac versions et al. C++ also lends itself better to a nuts
and bolts approach to designing something from bare paper to your
exact wants, while "visual" languages are more about rad.

C# is probably dominant in internal corporate software, which, for all
I know, comprises the majority of software written. I'm sure some
folks will offer differing opinions, but there's a start.

Don't know about the obfuscation thing. Try to use ildasm on
devenv.exe!

Bob

Jun 27 '08 #3

P: n/a
On Jun 25, 12:42*pm, Sin Jeong-hun <typing...@gmail.comwrote:
Hello.
This post is not about the C# language itself, but its usage in the
real world. I know a lot of commercial Windows desktop applications.
But actually I don't think any of them is written in C#. Some
applications do use C# but I think it's only a small part, and most of
the codes are written in C++. Is there any commercial application
written entirely (or mainly) in C#? Not .NET GUI components nor any
other libraries for .NET. Not freeware, not enterprise application,
server application, or custom software. *I mean general commercial
Windows desktop applications like Microsoft Word, WinRAR and so on .
We write a commercial application for finantial institutions and it's
written in C#, A friend of mine that works in a fast food logistics
company use C# too, they are developing a POS system to be deployed in
all the franchises of the chain.

As you can see there are, but you will not see one of the familiar
oldies application being rewritten in C# Too costly IMHO
Jun 27 '08 #4

P: n/a
On Jun 25, 1:08*pm, RvGrah <rvgrahamsevaten...@sbcglobal.netwrote:
Well, the entire ide for Visual Studio is written in C# according to
Microsoft. A quick google search also said that Powerquest DriveImage
is a dotnet written program. I think the question is somewhat moot,
since the advantage of c++ is that it's so embedded into established
companies' development process and it's also more friendly towards
porting to mac versions et al.
FYI, MAC use Objective C as it's preferred language. and I do not see
a lot of apps being ported.

I think it has to do with a cost proposition. It's not very cost
effective to simply ditch years of C++ code simply to use C#
Jun 27 '08 #5

P: n/a
RvGrah wrote:
Well, the entire ide for Visual Studio is written in C# according to
Microsoft. A quick google search also said that Powerquest DriveImage
is a dotnet written program. I think the question is somewhat moot,
since the advantage of c++ is that it's so embedded into established
companies' development process and it's also more friendly towards
porting to mac versions et al. C++ also lends itself better to a nuts
and bolts approach to designing something from bare paper to your
exact wants, while "visual" languages are more about rad.

C# is probably dominant in internal corporate software, which, for all
I know, comprises the majority of software written. I'm sure some
folks will offer differing opinions, but there's a start.

Don't know about the obfuscation thing. Try to use ildasm on
devenv.exe!
I doubt you'll get very far - it's not a .NET executable...

It probably either hosts the .NET framework or has a (probably modified)
version of the framework 'built in'.

Alun Harford
Jun 27 '08 #6

P: n/a
On Jun 25, 8:42*pm, Sin Jeong-hun <typing...@gmail.comwrote:
Hello.
This post is not about the C# language itself, but its usage in the
real world. I know a lot of commercial Windows desktop applications.
But actually I don't think any of them is written in C#. Some
applications do use C# but I think it's only a small part, and most of
the codes are written in C++. Is there any commercial application
written entirely (or mainly) in C#? Not .NET GUI components nor any
other libraries for .NET. Not freeware, not enterprise application,
server application, or custom software. *I mean general commercial
Windows desktop applications like Microsoft Word, WinRAR and so on .
ATI display drivers control panel is, apparently, written in .NET.
Jun 27 '08 #7

P: n/a
On Jun 26, 6:54*pm, Pavel Minaev <int...@gmail.comwrote:
On Jun 25, 8:42*pm, Sin Jeong-hun <typing...@gmail.comwrote:
Hello.
This post is not about the C# language itself, but its usage in the
real world. I know a lot of commercial Windows desktop applications.
But actually I don't think any of them is written in C#. Some
applications do use C# but I think it's only a small part, and most of
the codes are written in C++. Is there any commercial application
written entirely (or mainly) in C#? Not .NET GUI components nor any
other libraries for .NET. Not freeware, not enterprise application,
server application, or custom software. *I mean general commercial
Windows desktop applications like Microsoft Word, WinRAR and so on .

ATI display drivers control panel is, apparently, written in .NET.
Yes, but that's sort of freeware. I mean ones that are actually sold
to common end-users.

Jun 27 '08 #8

P: n/a
MC
Lots of them. An example:

www.tipsoftware.com

This is a knowledge management tool for personnel managers.

I have lots of research software written in C#; see www.ai.uga.edu/caspr.

Jun 27 '08 #9

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