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Web Service To No Where...



I wrote a program that loops through a file of records.

It parses each line in the file and sends them to a web service that
inserts them into an AS400DB2 database using Asynch calls.

This is the wierd part. Say their are 500 records in the file.

If I run the process once, maybe 250 will appear.

If I run it a second time, maybe 400 or all the records will appear.

Usually the third time I run it, all 500 appear.

From the consuming program, that reads the records, there is never any
error message thrown. There are always 500 calls to the web service.

I can see from my web server logs that the service is just not called
when the records are not written, so I don't think its on the database side.

So my question is: If they don't error out, where do all these web
services calls go?? I ASP.NET webservices just that flawed and
inconsistent that it cannot be depended on for this type of operation?

Would a more robust web server such as Apache 2.0 help?

Nov 23 '05 #1
30 2771
It could be that error messages are generated, but not received. This is the
case with one-way Web services where the Web service is defined to NOT return
any value. In that case, the proxy sends the SOAP message and closes the
connection right away without waiting to see if SOAP Faults are returned. Try
to force your Web service to return some value (or change the proxy generated
file) and try again. You might start receiving a lot of errors.

Waleed
"ja*****@texeme .com" wrote:


I wrote a program that loops through a file of records.

It parses each line in the file and sends them to a web service that
inserts them into an AS400DB2 database using Asynch calls.

This is the wierd part. Say their are 500 records in the file.

If I run the process once, maybe 250 will appear.

If I run it a second time, maybe 400 or all the records will appear.

Usually the third time I run it, all 500 appear.

From the consuming program, that reads the records, there is never any
error message thrown. There are always 500 calls to the web service.

I can see from my web server logs that the service is just not called
when the records are not written, so I don't think its on the database side.

So my question is: If they don't error out, where do all these web
services calls go?? I ASP.NET webservices just that flawed and
inconsistent that it cannot be depended on for this type of operation?

Would a more robust web server such as Apache 2.0 help?


Nov 23 '05 #2
It could be that error messages are generated, but not received. This is the
case with one-way Web services where the Web service is defined to NOT return
any value. In that case, the proxy sends the SOAP message and closes the
connection right away without waiting to see if SOAP Faults are returned. Try
to force your Web service to return some value (or change the proxy generated
file) and try again. You might start receiving a lot of errors.

Waleed
"ja*****@texeme .com" wrote:


I wrote a program that loops through a file of records.

It parses each line in the file and sends them to a web service that
inserts them into an AS400DB2 database using Asynch calls.

This is the wierd part. Say their are 500 records in the file.

If I run the process once, maybe 250 will appear.

If I run it a second time, maybe 400 or all the records will appear.

Usually the third time I run it, all 500 appear.

From the consuming program, that reads the records, there is never any
error message thrown. There are always 500 calls to the web service.

I can see from my web server logs that the service is just not called
when the records are not written, so I don't think its on the database side.

So my question is: If they don't error out, where do all these web
services calls go?? I ASP.NET webservices just that flawed and
inconsistent that it cannot be depended on for this type of operation?

Would a more robust web server such as Apache 2.0 help?


Nov 23 '05 #3

I would buy that explaination, except the web service server logs ( iis
) don't show those missing calls.

So, where are those calls?

Waleed Abdulla xrules org> <waleed_abdul la wrote:
It could be that error messages are generated, but not received. This is the
case with one-way Web services where the Web service is defined to NOT return
any value. In that case, the proxy sends the SOAP message and closes the
connection right away without waiting to see if SOAP Faults are returned. Try
to force your Web service to return some value (or change the proxy generated
file) and try again. You might start receiving a lot of errors.

Waleed
"ja*****@texeme .com" wrote:


I wrote a program that loops through a file of records.

It parses each line in the file and sends them to a web service that
inserts them into an AS400DB2 database using Asynch calls.

This is the wierd part. Say their are 500 records in the file.

If I run the process once, maybe 250 will appear.

If I run it a second time, maybe 400 or all the records will appear.

Usually the third time I run it, all 500 appear.

From the consuming program, that reads the records, there is never any
error message thrown. There are always 500 calls to the web service.

I can see from my web server logs that the service is just not called
when the records are not written, so I don't think its on the database side.

So my question is: If they don't error out, where do all these web
services calls go?? I ASP.NET webservices just that flawed and
inconsisten t that it cannot be depended on for this type of operation?

Would a more robust web server such as Apache 2.0 help?


Nov 23 '05 #4

I would buy that explaination, except the web service server logs ( iis
) don't show those missing calls.

So, where are those calls?

Waleed Abdulla xrules org> <waleed_abdul la wrote:
It could be that error messages are generated, but not received. This is the
case with one-way Web services where the Web service is defined to NOT return
any value. In that case, the proxy sends the SOAP message and closes the
connection right away without waiting to see if SOAP Faults are returned. Try
to force your Web service to return some value (or change the proxy generated
file) and try again. You might start receiving a lot of errors.

Waleed
"ja*****@texeme .com" wrote:


I wrote a program that loops through a file of records.

It parses each line in the file and sends them to a web service that
inserts them into an AS400DB2 database using Asynch calls.

This is the wierd part. Say their are 500 records in the file.

If I run the process once, maybe 250 will appear.

If I run it a second time, maybe 400 or all the records will appear.

Usually the third time I run it, all 500 appear.

From the consuming program, that reads the records, there is never any
error message thrown. There are always 500 calls to the web service.

I can see from my web server logs that the service is just not called
when the records are not written, so I don't think its on the database side.

So my question is: If they don't error out, where do all these web
services calls go?? I ASP.NET webservices just that flawed and
inconsisten t that it cannot be depended on for this type of operation?

Would a more robust web server such as Apache 2.0 help?


Nov 23 '05 #5

PS -- I also have tracing and logging on the web service -- those calls
are never recorded there.
Waleed Abdulla xrules org> <waleed_abdul la wrote:
It could be that error messages are generated, but not received. This is the
case with one-way Web services where the Web service is defined to NOT return
any value. In that case, the proxy sends the SOAP message and closes the
connection right away without waiting to see if SOAP Faults are returned. Try
to force your Web service to return some value (or change the proxy generated
file) and try again. You might start receiving a lot of errors.

Waleed
"ja*****@texeme .com" wrote:


I wrote a program that loops through a file of records.

It parses each line in the file and sends them to a web service that
inserts them into an AS400DB2 database using Asynch calls.

This is the wierd part. Say their are 500 records in the file.

If I run the process once, maybe 250 will appear.

If I run it a second time, maybe 400 or all the records will appear.

Usually the third time I run it, all 500 appear.

From the consuming program, that reads the records, there is never any
error message thrown. There are always 500 calls to the web service.

I can see from my web server logs that the service is just not called
when the records are not written, so I don't think its on the database side.

So my question is: If they don't error out, where do all these web
services calls go?? I ASP.NET webservices just that flawed and
inconsisten t that it cannot be depended on for this type of operation?

Would a more robust web server such as Apache 2.0 help?


Nov 23 '05 #6

PS -- I also have tracing and logging on the web service -- those calls
are never recorded there.
Waleed Abdulla xrules org> <waleed_abdul la wrote:
It could be that error messages are generated, but not received. This is the
case with one-way Web services where the Web service is defined to NOT return
any value. In that case, the proxy sends the SOAP message and closes the
connection right away without waiting to see if SOAP Faults are returned. Try
to force your Web service to return some value (or change the proxy generated
file) and try again. You might start receiving a lot of errors.

Waleed
"ja*****@texeme .com" wrote:


I wrote a program that loops through a file of records.

It parses each line in the file and sends them to a web service that
inserts them into an AS400DB2 database using Asynch calls.

This is the wierd part. Say their are 500 records in the file.

If I run the process once, maybe 250 will appear.

If I run it a second time, maybe 400 or all the records will appear.

Usually the third time I run it, all 500 appear.

From the consuming program, that reads the records, there is never any
error message thrown. There are always 500 calls to the web service.

I can see from my web server logs that the service is just not called
when the records are not written, so I don't think its on the database side.

So my question is: If they don't error out, where do all these web
services calls go?? I ASP.NET webservices just that flawed and
inconsisten t that it cannot be depended on for this type of operation?

Would a more robust web server such as Apache 2.0 help?


Nov 23 '05 #7
There is a client-side limit to how many simultaneous calls you can make
from one AppDomain to one web service (see the
ServicePointMan ager.DefaultCon *nectionLimit property). Make sure that the
calls are not dropped in the client side. You should see an exception in the
callback of the async call if the call is not completed.

Also, you could try debugging the problem by using your own threads to issue
the calls instead of using the built-in BeginXXX methods. This way you could
log every outgoing call and determine if and where the calls are dropped.

Regards,
Sami

<ja*****@texeme .com> wrote in message
news:sJ******** ************@sp eakeasy.net...

I would buy that explaination, except the web service server logs ( iis )
don't show those missing calls.

So, where are those calls?

Waleed Abdulla xrules org> <waleed_abdul la wrote:
It could be that error messages are generated, but not received. This is
the case with one-way Web services where the Web service is defined to
NOT return any value. In that case, the proxy sends the SOAP message and
closes the connection right away without waiting to see if SOAP Faults
are returned. Try to force your Web service to return some value (or
change the proxy generated file) and try again. You might start receiving
a lot of errors.

Waleed
"ja*****@texeme .com" wrote:


I wrote a program that loops through a file of records.

It parses each line in the file and sends them to a web service that
inserts them into an AS400DB2 database using Asynch calls.

This is the wierd part. Say their are 500 records in the file.

If I run the process once, maybe 250 will appear.

If I run it a second time, maybe 400 or all the records will appear.

Usually the third time I run it, all 500 appear.

From the consuming program, that reads the records, there is never any
error message thrown. There are always 500 calls to the web service.

I can see from my web server logs that the service is just not called
when the records are not written, so I don't think its on the database
side.

So my question is: If they don't error out, where do all these web
services calls go?? I ASP.NET webservices just that flawed and
inconsiste nt that it cannot be depended on for this type of operation?

Would a more robust web server such as Apache 2.0 help?


Nov 23 '05 #8
There is a client-side limit to how many simultaneous calls you can make
from one AppDomain to one web service (see the
ServicePointMan ager.DefaultCon *nectionLimit property). Make sure that the
calls are not dropped in the client side. You should see an exception in the
callback of the async call if the call is not completed.

Also, you could try debugging the problem by using your own threads to issue
the calls instead of using the built-in BeginXXX methods. This way you could
log every outgoing call and determine if and where the calls are dropped.

Regards,
Sami

<ja*****@texeme .com> wrote in message
news:sJ******** ************@sp eakeasy.net...

I would buy that explaination, except the web service server logs ( iis )
don't show those missing calls.

So, where are those calls?

Waleed Abdulla xrules org> <waleed_abdul la wrote:
It could be that error messages are generated, but not received. This is
the case with one-way Web services where the Web service is defined to
NOT return any value. In that case, the proxy sends the SOAP message and
closes the connection right away without waiting to see if SOAP Faults
are returned. Try to force your Web service to return some value (or
change the proxy generated file) and try again. You might start receiving
a lot of errors.

Waleed
"ja*****@texeme .com" wrote:


I wrote a program that loops through a file of records.

It parses each line in the file and sends them to a web service that
inserts them into an AS400DB2 database using Asynch calls.

This is the wierd part. Say their are 500 records in the file.

If I run the process once, maybe 250 will appear.

If I run it a second time, maybe 400 or all the records will appear.

Usually the third time I run it, all 500 appear.

From the consuming program, that reads the records, there is never any
error message thrown. There are always 500 calls to the web service.

I can see from my web server logs that the service is just not called
when the records are not written, so I don't think its on the database
side.

So my question is: If they don't error out, where do all these web
services calls go?? I ASP.NET webservices just that flawed and
inconsiste nt that it cannot be depended on for this type of operation?

Would a more robust web server such as Apache 2.0 help?


Nov 23 '05 #9
Sami Vaaraniemi wrote:
There is a client-side limit to how many simultaneous calls you can make
from one AppDomain to one web service (see the
ServicePointMan ager.DefaultCon nectionLimit property). Make sure that the
calls are not dropped in the client side. You should see an exception in
the callback of the async call if the call is not completed.
I wrap the Begin_ method in a try catch block. Is that enough? Or are you
saying there is a property of the IAsyncResult that I can access that traps
errors?
Also, you could try debugging the problem by using your own threads to
issue the calls instead of using the built-in BeginXXX methods. This way
you could log every outgoing call and determine if and where the calls are
dropped.
Wow! Ok, so I could launch the calls using the synchronized method, but,
say put them all into the ThreadPool?

Regards,
Sami

<ja*****@texeme .com> wrote in message
news:sJ******** ************@sp eakeasy.net...

I would buy that explaination, except the web service server logs ( iis )
don't show those missing calls.

So, where are those calls?

Waleed Abdulla xrules org> <waleed_abdul la wrote:
It could be that error messages are generated, but not received. This is
the case with one-way Web services where the Web service is defined to
NOT return any value. In that case, the proxy sends the SOAP message and
closes the connection right away without waiting to see if SOAP Faults
are returned. Try to force your Web service to return some value (or
change the proxy generated file) and try again. You might start
receiving a lot of errors.

Waleed
"ja*****@texeme .com" wrote:

I wrote a program that loops through a file of records.

It parses each line in the file and sends them to a web service that
inserts them into an AS400DB2 database using Asynch calls.

This is the wierd part. Say their are 500 records in the file.

If I run the process once, maybe 250 will appear.

If I run it a second time, maybe 400 or all the records will appear.

Usually the third time I run it, all 500 appear.

From the consuming program, that reads the records, there is never any
error message thrown. There are always 500 calls to the web service.

I can see from my web server logs that the service is just not called
when the records are not written, so I don't think its on the database
side.

So my question is: If they don't error out, where do all these web
services calls go?? I ASP.NET webservices just that flawed and
inconsisten t that it cannot be depended on for this type of operation?

Would a more robust web server such as Apache 2.0 help?



--
Texeme Textcasting Technology
http://www.texeme.com
Nov 23 '05 #10

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