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Hi

I am very much new to JavaScript.I need to validate IP
Adress field in such a way that it should accept values form 0-255 in
the format (IPaddress=123.221.3.5) or any oher values but between 0 and
255,excluding 0 and 255.Every field should be seperated by a dot as
shown in example.
Kindly help me in sorting it out

Aug 10 '06 #1
9 1500
sh********@gmail.com wrote:
I am very much new to JavaScript.I need to validate IP
Adress field in such a way that it should accept values form 0-255 in
the format (IPaddress=123.221.3.5) or any oher values but between 0 and
255,excluding 0 and 255.Every field should be seperated by a dot as
shown in example.
Kindly help me in sorting it out
Hi,

If you use that as a String, you can split in on the . and get 4 values.
The function split() returns 4 values in an array in your case.
Try to cast each seperate value to an interger, using parseInt(), and check
if that is possible (if not, you are receiving something like abc.34.g.lp).
(Make sure you pass the right radix, 10, to the function as second argument,
otherwise Javascript will interpret strings that begin with '0X' as
hexadecimal.)
Also, it is quite impossible to learn Javascript from the web/newsgroups
without a good book/reference.
My advise is: O'Reilly's 'Javascript, the definitive guide 4th edition'.

Good luck,

Regards,
Erwin Moller
Aug 10 '06 #2
You can also use regular expression to test IP Address. Try something
like this:
/****
* @author Georgi Naumov
* @abstract This function
* assumes IP address as
* argument and test if
* the argument is valid
* IP Address or not.
* @param aIpAddress -
* IP addres whos will be
* checked.
* @return true if the argument
* is valid false otherwise.
***/
function IsIpAddressValid(aIpAddress){
var re=/^(?:[1-254]{1}\.){3}[1-254]{1}$/;
var myStr=aIpAddress.toString();
if(myStr.search(re) != null)
return true;
else
return false;
}
alert(IsIpAddressValid("192.168.10.1"));
Best Regards
Erwin Moller написа:
sh********@gmail.com wrote:
I am very much new to JavaScript.I need to validate IP
Adress field in such a way that it should accept values form 0-255 in
the format (IPaddress=123.221.3.5) or any oher values but between 0 and
255,excluding 0 and 255.Every field should be seperated by a dot as
shown in example.
Kindly help me in sorting it out

Hi,

If you use that as a String, you can split in on the . and get 4 values.
The function split() returns 4 values in an array in your case.
Try to cast each seperate value to an interger, using parseInt(), and check
if that is possible (if not, you are receiving something like abc.34.g.lp).
(Make sure you pass the right radix, 10, to the function as second argument,
otherwise Javascript will interpret strings that begin with '0X' as
hexadecimal.)
Also, it is quite impossible to learn Javascript from the web/newsgroups
without a good book/reference.
My advise is: O'Reilly's 'Javascript, the definitive guide 4th edition'.

Good luck,

Regards,
Erwin Moller
Aug 10 '06 #3
JRS: In article <44**********************@news.xs4all.nl>, dated Thu,
10 Aug 2006 11:08:00 remote, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, Erwin
Moller <si******************************************@spam yourself.com>
posted :
>sh********@gmail.com wrote:
OP : please use an intelligent Subject line.
>I need to validate IP
>Adress field
>If you use that as a String, you can split in on the . and get 4 values.
The function split() returns 4 values in an array in your case.
Try to cast each seperate value to an interger, using parseInt(), and check
if that is possible (if not, you are receiving something like abc.34.g.lp).
(Make sure you pass the right radix, 10, to the function as second argument,
otherwise Javascript will interpret strings that begin with '0X' as
hexadecimal.)
But parseInt(S, 10) will accept S = "12J" & S = "-155".

I suggest a RegExp .match() with /^(\d+)\.(\d+)\.(\d+)\.(\d+)$/
which should IIRC give either null or an array whose elements 1..4 are
the digit strings. Those can be converted in a loop to numbers with
unary + and checked numerically for range.

Actually, it should be (\d{1.3}) but with a numeric range-check that
should not matter.

Consider
S = "004.6.155.133"
M = S.match(/^(\d+)\.(\d+)\.(\d+)\.(\d+)$/)
if (!M) alert("bad pattern")
for (j=1; j<=4; j++) { T = +M[j]
if (T==0 || T>254) alert("bad #"+j) }
--
John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 MIME.
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/- FAQqish topics, acronyms & links;
Astro stuff via astron-1.htm, gravity0.htm ; quotings.htm, pascal.htm, etc.
No Encoding. Quotes before replies. Snip well. Write clearly. Don't Mail News.
Aug 10 '06 #4
JRS: In article <11**********************@i3g2000cwc.googlegroups. com>,
dated Thu, 10 Aug 2006 04:38:10 remote, seen in
news:comp.lang.javascript, Georgi Naumov <go******@gmail.composted :
function IsIpAddressValid(aIpAddress){
var re=/^(?:[1-254]{1}\.){3}[1-254]{1}$/;
var myStr=aIpAddress.toString();
if(myStr.search(re) != null)
return true;
else
return false;
}
alert(IsIpAddressValid("192.168.10.1"));
Your RegExp does not work in all JS browsers. Your use of [1-254] is a
construction I don't recall seeing before. {1} seems superfluous. I
don't see the need for .toString().

And return myStr.search(re) != null is simpler.

--
John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 IE 4
<URL:http://www.jibbering.com/faq/>? JL/RC: FAQ of news:comp.lang.javascript
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-index.htmjscr maths, dates, sources.
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/TP/BP/Delphi/jscr/&c, FAQ items, links.
Aug 10 '06 #5
Dr John Stockton <jr*@merlyn.demon.co.ukwrites:
JRS: In article <11**********************@i3g2000cwc.googlegroups. com>,
dated Thu, 10 Aug 2006 04:38:10 remote, seen in
news:comp.lang.javascript, Georgi Naumov <go******@gmail.composted :
> function IsIpAddressValid(aIpAddress){
var re=/^(?:[1-254]{1}\.){3}[1-254]{1}$/;
var myStr=aIpAddress.toString();
if(myStr.search(re) != null)
return true;
else
return false;
}
alert(IsIpAddressValid("192.168.10.1"));

Your RegExp does not work in all JS browsers. Your use of [1-254] is a
construction I don't recall seeing before.
You probably have seen it. It matches the characters 1, 2, 5 and 4.

What was probably intended would be:
(?:(?:[01]?[0-9])?[0-9]|2(?:[0-4][0-9]|5[0-5]))
i.e., numbers in the range 0 through 255 (it should not be just 1..254!)

The resulting total regexp is quite impressive, and a good example
of why you shouldn't use regexps for everything. It's much better
to test the format using a regexp and then test the numeric properties
using ... numbers.

function isIpAddressValid(ipAddressString) {
// test format dotted quad
if (!/^(?:\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3}$/.test(ipAddressString)) {
return false;
}
// test numbers 0 .. 255
var parts = ipAddressString.split(".");
for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
var n = parts[i] = Number(parts[i]);
if (n 255) {
return false;
}
}
return true;
}

When you have parsed the ipAddressString into quad numbers, it's
easy to add other tests. E.g., insert this before "return true":

// test probable network or broadcast address. Bad!
if (parts[3] == 0 || parts[3] == 255) {
return false;
}

{1} seems superfluous. I don't see the need for .toString().
Can't see from this post what type aIpAddress might have. If it's
a user defined object, then you do need to convert it to string
to use the "search" method.
And return myStr.search(re) != null is simpler.
Since String.prototype.search returns a number, the index of the match
and -1 if no match, this test is always false.

So, alternatively:
return myStr.search(re) >= 0;
or, since the regexp is rooted at both ends,
return !myStr.search(re); // since it's always 0 or -1.

/L
--
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen - lr*@hotpop.com
DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
Aug 10 '06 #6
Your RegExp does not work in all JS browsers.
I have tested this code under Mozilla FireFox, Opera9 and Internet
Explorer and it worked fine.
>.Your use of [1-254] is a
construction I don't recall seeing before.
[1-254] Is a "character class" and tell to regular expression engine
"Match a single character in the range between 1 and 254".
>.{1} seems superfluous.
You are rigth.
don't see the need for .toString().
This is provided if the argument is something different from string.
For
example user defined object.
And return myStr.search(re) != null is simpler.
Yes this is much better.
You can test this improved version. I wrote it only for fun.

/**
* @author Georgi Naumov
* @version 1.1 ;)
* @abstract This function assumes IP address as
* argument and test if the argument is valid
* IP Address or not.
* @param aIpAddress - IP addres whos will be
* checked.
* @return true if the argument
* is valid false otherwise.
*
* Special thanks for John Stockton
* for his criticism.
**/
function IsIpAddressValid(aIpAddress){
var re=/^(?:[1-254]\.){3}[1-254]$/;
var myStr=aIpAddress.toString();
return myStr.search(re) != null;
}
/**
* Example for function usage.
*/
alert(IsIpAddressValid("333.333.3.3"));

Best Regards

Dr John Stockton написа:
JRS: In article <11**********************@i3g2000cwc.googlegroups. com>,
dated Thu, 10 Aug 2006 04:38:10 remote, seen in
news:comp.lang.javascript, Georgi Naumov <go******@gmail.composted :
function IsIpAddressValid(aIpAddress){
var re=/^(?:[1-254]{1}\.){3}[1-254]{1}$/;
var myStr=aIpAddress.toString();
if(myStr.search(re) != null)
return true;
else
return false;
}
alert(IsIpAddressValid("192.168.10.1"));

Your RegExp does not work in all JS browsers. Your use of [1-254] is a
construction I don't recall seeing before. {1} seems superfluous. I
don't see the need for .toString().

And return myStr.search(re) != null is simpler.

--
© John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00IE 4 ©
<URL:http://www.jibbering.com/faq/>? JL/RC: FAQ of news:comp.lang.javascript
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-index.htmjscr maths, dates, sources.
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/TP/BP/Delphi/jscr/&c, FAQ items, links.
Aug 11 '06 #7
There was a erros in my posting. Sorry for this. Anyway the
conversation is very usefull.
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen написа:
Dr John Stockton <jr*@merlyn.demon.co.ukwrites:
JRS: In article <11**********************@i3g2000cwc.googlegroups. com>,
dated Thu, 10 Aug 2006 04:38:10 remote, seen in
news:comp.lang.javascript, Georgi Naumov <go******@gmail.composted :
function IsIpAddressValid(aIpAddress){
var re=/^(?:[1-254]{1}\.){3}[1-254]{1}$/;
var myStr=aIpAddress.toString();
if(myStr.search(re) != null)
return true;
else
return false;
}
alert(IsIpAddressValid("192.168.10.1"));
Your RegExp does not work in all JS browsers. Your use of [1-254] is a
construction I don't recall seeing before.

You probably have seen it. It matches the characters 1, 2, 5 and 4.

What was probably intended would be:
(?:(?:[01]?[0-9])?[0-9]|2(?:[0-4][0-9]|5[0-5]))
i.e., numbers in the range 0 through 255 (it should not be just 1..254!)

The resulting total regexp is quite impressive, and a good example
of why you shouldn't use regexps for everything. It's much better
to test the format using a regexp and then test the numeric properties
using ... numbers.

function isIpAddressValid(ipAddressString) {
// test format dotted quad
if (!/^(?:\d{1,3}\.){3}\d{1,3}$/.test(ipAddressString)) {
return false;
}
// test numbers 0 .. 255
var parts = ipAddressString.split(".");
for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
var n = parts[i] = Number(parts[i]);
if (n 255) {
return false;
}
}
return true;
}

When you have parsed the ipAddressString into quad numbers, it's
easy to add other tests. E.g., insert this before "return true":

// test probable network or broadcast address. Bad!
if (parts[3] == 0 || parts[3] == 255) {
return false;
}

{1} seems superfluous. I don't see the need for .toString().

Can't see from this post what type aIpAddress might have. If it's
a user defined object, then you do need to convert it to string
to use the "search" method.
And return myStr.search(re) != null is simpler.

Since String.prototype.search returns a number, the index of the match
and -1 if no match, this test is always false.

So, alternatively:
return myStr.search(re) >= 0;
or, since the regexp is rooted at both ends,
return !myStr.search(re); // since it's always 0 or -1.

/L
--
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen - lr*@hotpop.com
DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
Aug 11 '06 #8
Georgi Naumov wrote:
>Your RegExp does not work in all JS browsers.
I have tested this code under Mozilla FireFox, Opera9
and Internet Explorer and it worked fine.
The difference between 3 and 'all' is at least couple of dozen. The
regular expression is not limited to the constructs defined in the
current ECMA specification for javascript regular expressions, and
assuming universal support for language extensions is rarely advisable
outside a known environment.
>>.Your use of [1-254] is a
construction I don't recall seeing before.
[1-254] Is a "character class" and tell to regular expression
engine "Match a single character in the range between 1 and 254".
It is a character calls, but the sense in which it is possible for a
single character to be in a range between 1 and 254 is very
questionable, as 254 is 3 characters. And if we were talking character
codes between 1 and 254 the result would not resemble the question asked
at all.

That character calls actually matches a single character in the range 1
to 2 and the characters 5 and 4; 1,2,4 and 5. It will not do the job
required here, though non-vigorous testing may produce the illusion that
it does.
<snip>

Richard.

Aug 11 '06 #9
JRS: In article <7j**********@hotpop.com>, dated Fri, 11 Aug 2006
01:10:22 remote, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, Lasse Reichstein
Nielsen <lr*@hotpop.composted :
>Dr John Stockton <jr*@merlyn.demon.co.ukwrites:
>JRS: In article <11**********************@i3g2000cwc.googlegroups. com>,
dated Thu, 10 Aug 2006 04:38:10 remote, seen in
news:comp.lang.javascript, Georgi Naumov <go******@gmail.composted :
>> function IsIpAddressValid(aIpAddress){
var re=/^(?:[1-254]{1}\.){3}[1-254]{1}$/;
var myStr=aIpAddress.toString();
if(myStr.search(re) != null)
return true;
else
return false;
}
alert(IsIpAddressValid("192.168.10.1"));

Your RegExp does not work in all JS browsers. Your use of [1-254] is a
construction I don't recall seeing before.

You probably have seen it. It matches the characters 1, 2, 5 and 4.
Perhaps I should have used "**Your use**" ... since he clearly expects
it to match a string of numerical value between 1 & 254 inclusive.

>What was probably intended would be:
(?:(?:[01]?[0-9])?[0-9]|2(?:[0-4][0-9]|5[0-5]))
i.e., numbers in the range 0 through 255 (it should not be just 1..254!)
The OP seems both to want and not want to include 0 & 255, I
demonstrated the latter.
>{1} seems superfluous. I don't see the need for .toString().

Can't see from this post what type aIpAddress might have. If it's
a user defined object, then you do need to convert it to string
to use the "search" method.
ISTM that the surrounding code must provide a string - nothing else can
hold a dotted quad - and if the coder inadvertently passed a non-string
then the surrounding code is unreasonable and needs fixing.
>And return myStr.search(re) != null is simpler.

Since String.prototype.search returns a number, the index of the match
and -1 if no match, this test is always false.
Alas, although writing "search" I was thinking "match", as used in my
first post in this thread. Match is useful in that it provides both an
answer to "is the pattern OK?" and a decomposition into the desired
fields (there may be some unlikely case, such as using a RegExp to find
nothing in an empty string, where one cannot tell the difference).
Read the newsgroup FAQ.
--
John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 IE 4
<URL:http://www.jibbering.com/faq/>? JL/RC: FAQ of news:comp.lang.javascript
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-index.htmjscr maths, dates, sources.
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/TP/BP/Delphi/jscr/&c, FAQ items, links.
Aug 11 '06 #10

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