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How to find a webpage is created using which language?

Malathi
P: 31
Hi All,

In internet we are seeing a lot of websites. I would like to know by seeing the url is there any possibility to find the language in which the webpage is created. Or else any other way?

Malathi
Apr 5 '12 #1

✓ answered by Frinavale

HTML is the standard that browsers use to display websites.

Web browsers may use plug-ins to display websites developed with another type of technology (like Flash or Silverlight).

But, in general websites use HTML to tell the browsers how to display the content that the server has sent to it.

The HTML could be dynamically generated by an application or script that runs on the web server. These applications could be implemented using a variety of technologies. Some of the most popular are PHP, Python, ASP, ASP.NET, Java...and more!

You can sometimes tell what technology was used to write the application that generates the HTML based on the extension that appears in the url.

For example if the url is something like: www.somedomain/index.php you have an indication that it is a PHP script that is generating the HTML.

Likewise, if the url is www.somedomain/index.aspx you know that it was ASP.NET that generated the HTML. But even though you know an ASP.NET application was used to generate the HTML, you don't know if it was written in C# or VB.NET.

Sometimes there is no extension involved though. For example, ASP.NET applications developed with MVC don't have those extensions.

So, to answer your question, sometimes you are given some indication as to what was used to dynamically generate HTML, and sometimes you can't tell.

-Frinny

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5 Replies


Frinavale
Expert Mod 5K+
P: 9,731
HTML is the standard that browsers use to display websites.

Web browsers may use plug-ins to display websites developed with another type of technology (like Flash or Silverlight).

But, in general websites use HTML to tell the browsers how to display the content that the server has sent to it.

The HTML could be dynamically generated by an application or script that runs on the web server. These applications could be implemented using a variety of technologies. Some of the most popular are PHP, Python, ASP, ASP.NET, Java...and more!

You can sometimes tell what technology was used to write the application that generates the HTML based on the extension that appears in the url.

For example if the url is something like: www.somedomain/index.php you have an indication that it is a PHP script that is generating the HTML.

Likewise, if the url is www.somedomain/index.aspx you know that it was ASP.NET that generated the HTML. But even though you know an ASP.NET application was used to generate the HTML, you don't know if it was written in C# or VB.NET.

Sometimes there is no extension involved though. For example, ASP.NET applications developed with MVC don't have those extensions.

So, to answer your question, sometimes you are given some indication as to what was used to dynamically generate HTML, and sometimes you can't tell.

-Frinny
Apr 5 '12 #2

Malathi
P: 31
I got the point! Thank you Frinny!
Apr 9 '12 #3

Monomachus
Expert 100+
P: 127
You can see more details using developer tools like Firebug or Chrome/IE developer tools.
In your Network tab you can see the headers of your GET request so like this for example I can say that bytes are done using PHP 5.2.17

Apr 9 '12 #4

Malathi
P: 31
Though I dont have the tool, I googled it out.. Its really interesting!
Apr 26 '12 #5

P: 93
some times the developers of the website uses some advance code security and other security methods or URL bindings so you can not identify that the site is developed with which language. I have found many times it's solution.

web browser -> mouse -> right click -> view page source

one window will open which contains the plain html code and some client side scripting code. here you can find on each and every link of the site where webpages are hyperlinked with it's language extension in which they are developed....

Try it....

Bharat Parmar(Bharat383)
May 1 '12 #6

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