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Newbie: Advantage of DotNet over Java

Hi,
We are having a debate on DotNet and Java.
As a beginner I do not have much experience on DotNet and Java.

Are there any major advantage of using DotNet over Java?

Thanks for any help I get on this subject.
Mark
Jul 9 '08 #1
6 2159
Others can address the platform issue better, but from a pure language issue
you have to decide whether you want the ultra-sparseness of Java or not (no
delegates, no preprocessor, no operator overloading, no linq, no value types,
.... stop me anytime...).
--
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"Mark" wrote:
Hi,
We are having a debate on DotNet and Java.
As a beginner I do not have much experience on DotNet and Java.

Are there any major advantage of using DotNet over Java?

Thanks for any help I get on this subject.
Mark
Jul 9 '08 #2
From what I understand - .Net is platform independent like Java - except
..Net is proprietary - unlike Java. I think that means it is exclusively
microsoft based but can run on Linux, Mac, windows (I'm not sure what
else). But if you will be working with Server databases like Sql
Server, Oracle - I have not seen anything like the .Net dataAdapter
(ADO.Net) in Java (but I have not done any coding in Java since about
2004). I have not seen anything easier or as robust or flexible for
manipulating data between an appication and a server DB than ADO.Net. I
just don't know what proprietary means - exactly - as far as software
goes - if it runs on a bunch of different platforms. You still have to
buy Java (Eclipse or whatever is is now) just like .Net. I guess if you
are using a Tomcat webserver (or something related to Tomcat/Apache)
then yes - Java would be easier to deal with than .Net. I don't think
..Net can interface with Tomcat/Apache (I may be wrong - don't know).

Rich

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Jul 9 '08 #3

"Rich P" <rp*****@aol.comwrote in message
news:uU**************@TK2MSFTNGP04.phx.gbl...
From what I understand - .Net is platform independent like Java - except
Net is proprietary - unlike Java.
..Net is not proprietary to MS. MS gave .Net away, which is control by the
ISO and ECMA. MS does sit on those ISO and ECMA standard committees along
with IBM, Novell, Hilliard Packer and Sun Micro Systems, and they control
what happens to .Net, which is a standard. Java is not a standard.

The only proprietary element in .Net is VB.net, which is owned by MS.
That's not to say that MS doesn't have a strong influence in the development
of the .Net technology, but MS doesn't own .Net.

That's why other 3rd party software language vendors can tap into .Net
technology, because .Net is not proprietary to MS.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CLI_Languages
http://dotnetpowered.com/languages.aspx

Jul 10 '08 #4
Pro's over Java:
- The .NET Framework enjoys superior performance over applications running
on the Java virtual machine.

- CLR allows for code from a variety of languages to be compiled to IL and
run, meaning that language choice comes down to developer preference rather
than being locked into one language (i.e. Java).

- Broader range of language concepts supported

- Will soon be expanded into the rich web client arena, so desktop skills
can be leveraged for web development as well

- Arguably has a much wider range of capabilities and technologies than Java

- Is not a "last resort language" (for when platform independence is
required) like Java, but is often a first choice language where platform
independence isn't a requirement.

- ISO standardisation means that, when developing multi platform apps,
they're much more likely to run the same on two different platforms.
Believe it or not, this is not always the case for Java.
Java's pro's over .NET:

- Wider range of platforms support it (for now).
That's my $0.02 anyway, and I should point out that I'm far from an expert
on this subject. With a little digging and Googlage you could probably find
far more information.

Hope that helps you some,
~Alex
"Mark" <Ma**@nospaml.comwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
Hi,
We are having a debate on DotNet and Java.
As a beginner I do not have much experience on DotNet and Java.

Are there any major advantage of using DotNet over Java?

Thanks for any help I get on this subject.
Mark

Jul 18 '08 #5
Are you referring to AJAX here or something else:
Will soon be expanded into the rich web client arena, so desktop skills
can be leveraged for web development as well
"Alex Clark" <qu****@noemail.noemailwrote in message
news:ux**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
Pro's over Java:
- The .NET Framework enjoys superior performance over applications running
on the Java virtual machine.

- CLR allows for code from a variety of languages to be compiled to IL and
run, meaning that language choice comes down to developer preference
rather than being locked into one language (i.e. Java).

- Broader range of language concepts supported

- Will soon be expanded into the rich web client arena, so desktop skills
can be leveraged for web development as well

- Arguably has a much wider range of capabilities and technologies than
Java

- Is not a "last resort language" (for when platform independence is
required) like Java, but is often a first choice language where platform
independence isn't a requirement.

- ISO standardisation means that, when developing multi platform apps,
they're much more likely to run the same on two different platforms.
Believe it or not, this is not always the case for Java.
Java's pro's over .NET:

- Wider range of platforms support it (for now).
That's my $0.02 anyway, and I should point out that I'm far from an expert
on this subject. With a little digging and Googlage you could probably
find far more information.

Hope that helps you some,
~Alex
"Mark" <Ma**@nospaml.comwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>Hi,
We are having a debate on DotNet and Java.
As a beginner I do not have much experience on DotNet and Java.

Are there any major advantage of using DotNet over Java?

Thanks for any help I get on this subject.
Mark

Jul 21 '08 #6
XAML mainly - most of the WPF XAML is supported in Silverlight applications,
and VB.NET/C# will be as of version 2.0 as well (via a very trimmed down
multi-platform runtime). Silverlight for mobile devices will hit markets
within the next 12 months also.

Basically, MS have opened up the war on Adobe and Java to include all
fronts.

"Dean Slindee" <sl*****@charter.netwrote in message
news:D1**********************************@microsof t.com...
Are you referring to AJAX here or something else:
Will soon be expanded into the rich web client arena, so desktop skills
can be leveraged for web development as well
"Alex Clark" <qu****@noemail.noemailwrote in message
news:ux**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>Pro's over Java:
- The .NET Framework enjoys superior performance over applications
running on the Java virtual machine.

- CLR allows for code from a variety of languages to be compiled to IL
and run, meaning that language choice comes down to developer preference
rather than being locked into one language (i.e. Java).

- Broader range of language concepts supported

- Will soon be expanded into the rich web client arena, so desktop skills
can be leveraged for web development as well

- Arguably has a much wider range of capabilities and technologies than
Java

- Is not a "last resort language" (for when platform independence is
required) like Java, but is often a first choice language where platform
independence isn't a requirement.

- ISO standardisation means that, when developing multi platform apps,
they're much more likely to run the same on two different platforms.
Believe it or not, this is not always the case for Java.
Java's pro's over .NET:

- Wider range of platforms support it (for now).
That's my $0.02 anyway, and I should point out that I'm far from an
expert on this subject. With a little digging and Googlage you could
probably find far more information.

Hope that helps you some,
~Alex
"Mark" <Ma**@nospaml.comwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>>Hi,
We are having a debate on DotNet and Java.
As a beginner I do not have much experience on DotNet and Java.

Are there any major advantage of using DotNet over Java?

Thanks for any help I get on this subject.
Mark


Jul 23 '08 #7

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Replies have been disabled for this discussion.

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