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How to stop incrementing the DLL version number?

P: n/a
I have written a VB.NET DLL that is called by a third party program. If
I make any changes in the DLL and then try to replace my DLL file the
third party program will abort, saying that the DLL version number does
not match to the DLL that it was linked against. How can I recompile my
DLL without incrementing the version number? I don't see where this
"version number" is stored in the project. The version number, under the
"Assembly Information..." button, is not being incremented. I therefore
assume that the DDL version number is stored somewhere else.

John
Jun 27 '08 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
In your assembly.info file, there's a line that might look something like
this:

<Assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.0.0.*")>

The asterisk gives the builder permission to increment the version number on
each build. To fix the version number, specify it without an asterisk, such
as:

<Assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.0.0.0")>

Tom Dacon
Dacon Software Consulting
"John" <me@nospam.comwrote in message
news:MP************************@newsgroups.comcast .net...
>I have written a VB.NET DLL that is called by a third party program. If
I make any changes in the DLL and then try to replace my DLL file the
third party program will abort, saying that the DLL version number does
not match to the DLL that it was linked against. How can I recompile my
DLL without incrementing the version number? I don't see where this
"version number" is stored in the project. The version number, under the
"Assembly Information..." button, is not being incremented. I therefore
assume that the DDL version number is stored somewhere else.

John

Jun 27 '08 #2

P: n/a
Tom,

Thanks for your reply. It appears that assembly.info file is already set
that way, i.e. <Assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.0.0.0")>. If I look at the
properties of the DLL both the Assembly Version and File Version are set
to "1.0.0.0". Is there something else going on?

John

In article <ub**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl>,
td****@community.nospam says...
In your assembly.info file, there's a line that might look something like
this:

<Assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.0.0.*")>

The asterisk gives the builder permission to increment the version number on
each build. To fix the version number, specify it without an asterisk, such
as:

<Assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.0.0.0")>

Tom Dacon
Dacon Software Consulting
"John" <me@nospam.comwrote in message
news:MP************************@newsgroups.comcast .net...
I have written a VB.NET DLL that is called by a third party program. If
I make any changes in the DLL and then try to replace my DLL file the
third party program will abort, saying that the DLL version number does
not match to the DLL that it was linked against. How can I recompile my
DLL without incrementing the version number? I don't see where this
"version number" is stored in the project. The version number, under the
"Assembly Information..." button, is not being incremented. I therefore
assume that the DDL version number is stored somewhere else.

John


Jun 27 '08 #3

P: n/a
Beats me, John. This is all it's ever taken for me.

Good luck,
Tom
"John" <me@nospam.comwrote in message
news:MP************************@newsgroups.comcast .net...
Tom,

Thanks for your reply. It appears that assembly.info file is already set
that way, i.e. <Assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.0.0.0")>. If I look at the
properties of the DLL both the Assembly Version and File Version are set
to "1.0.0.0". Is there something else going on?

John

In article <ub**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl>,
td****@community.nospam says...
>In your assembly.info file, there's a line that might look something like
this:

<Assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.0.0.*")>

The asterisk gives the builder permission to increment the version number
on
each build. To fix the version number, specify it without an asterisk,
such
as:

<Assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.0.0.0")>

Tom Dacon
Dacon Software Consulting
"John" <me@nospam.comwrote in message
news:MP************************@newsgroups.comcas t.net...
>I have written a VB.NET DLL that is called by a third party program. If
I make any changes in the DLL and then try to replace my DLL file the
third party program will abort, saying that the DLL version number does
not match to the DLL that it was linked against. How can I recompile my
DLL without incrementing the version number? I don't see where this
"version number" is stored in the project. The version number, under
the
"Assembly Information..." button, is not being incremented. I therefore
assume that the DDL version number is stored somewhere else.

John



Jun 27 '08 #4

P: n/a
The error message seems a little strange in that the third party app seems to
know about the versioning of your product. Do you provide code/dll/libraries
to the third party that they compile against? When we have created plugins
for external apps in our group we are usually matching an interface spec via
COM as a plug-in. When versioning was important for book keeping, Tom's
answer was all we had to do as well.

"John" wrote:
I have written a VB.NET DLL that is called by a third party program. If
I make any changes in the DLL and then try to replace my DLL file the
third party program will abort, saying that the DLL version number does
not match to the DLL that it was linked against. How can I recompile my
DLL without incrementing the version number? I don't see where this
"version number" is stored in the project. The version number, under the
"Assembly Information..." button, is not being incremented. I therefore
assume that the DDL version number is stored somewhere else.

John
Jun 27 '08 #5

P: n/a
Yes. I supplied the DLL to the third party who then compile and link
their code against my DLL.

John

In article <67**********************************@microsoft.co m>,
Fa************@discussions.microsoft.com says...
The error message seems a little strange in that the third party app seems to
know about the versioning of your product. Do you provide code/dll/libraries
to the third party that they compile against? When we have created plugins
for external apps in our group we are usually matching an interface spec via
COM as a plug-in. When versioning was important for book keeping, Tom's
answer was all we had to do as well.

"John" wrote:
I have written a VB.NET DLL that is called by a third party program. If
I make any changes in the DLL and then try to replace my DLL file the
third party program will abort, saying that the DLL version number does
not match to the DLL that it was linked against. How can I recompile my
DLL without incrementing the version number? I don't see where this
"version number" is stored in the project. The version number, under the
"Assembly Information..." button, is not being incremented. I therefore
assume that the DDL version number is stored somewhere else.

John
Jun 27 '08 #6

P: n/a
Then I would make sure both the AssemblyVersion and FileVersion numbers are
identical between builds. The other builder may be comparing those. They
may even be looking at some form of checksum on the dll.

"John" wrote:
Yes. I supplied the DLL to the third party who then compile and link
their code against my DLL.

John

In article <67**********************************@microsoft.co m>,
Fa************@discussions.microsoft.com says...
The error message seems a little strange in that the third party app seems to
know about the versioning of your product. Do you provide code/dll/libraries
to the third party that they compile against? When we have created plugins
for external apps in our group we are usually matching an interface spec via
COM as a plug-in. When versioning was important for book keeping, Tom's
answer was all we had to do as well.

"John" wrote:
I have written a VB.NET DLL that is called by a third party program. If
I make any changes in the DLL and then try to replace my DLL file the
third party program will abort, saying that the DLL version number does
not match to the DLL that it was linked against. How can I recompile my
DLL without incrementing the version number? I don't see where this
"version number" is stored in the project. The version number, under the
"Assembly Information..." button, is not being incremented. I therefore
assume that the DDL version number is stored somewhere else.
>
John
>
Jun 27 '08 #7

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