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Glass effect with VB.net?

P: n/a
I've seen example code for doing Glass effects with C#, but not with VB.NET.

Is there a web page that gives examples on how to do this?
Jul 24 '07 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
On Jul 24, 6:59 pm, "Xenomorph" <s...@spam.comwrote:
I've seen example code for doing Glass effects with C#, but not with VB.NET.

Is there a web page that gives examples on how to do this?
Why not just convert the C# to Visual Basic? It's not really that
complicated as you really just have to worry about the syntax
differences - both languages use the language libraries.

Thanks,

Seth Rowe

Jul 24 '07 #2

P: n/a
Tom
May i suggest:
http://www.developerfusion.co.uk/Uti...sharptovb.aspx

Built off the SharpDevelop Code Converter.

Tom

rowe_newsgroups wrote:
On Jul 24, 6:59 pm, "Xenomorph" <s...@spam.comwrote:
>I've seen example code for doing Glass effects with C#, but not with VB.NET.

Is there a web page that gives examples on how to do this?

Why not just convert the C# to Visual Basic? It's not really that
complicated as you really just have to worry about the syntax
differences - both languages use the language libraries.

Thanks,

Seth Rowe
Jul 25 '07 #3

P: n/a
Why convert it? Simply create your resulting DLL and reference it in the
IDE. This is what I did for a C# glassy button found on Code Project web
site. The only real reason for converting it is to modify the code and you
feel better doing so in VB.NET, otherwise language doesn't matter.
"Xenomorph" <sp**@spam.comwrote in message
news:69**********************************@microsof t.com...
I've seen example code for doing Glass effects with C#, but not with
VB.NET.

Is there a web page that gives examples on how to do this?


Jul 25 '07 #4

P: n/a
Why convert it? Simply create your resulting DLL and reference it in
the IDE. This is what I did for a C# glassy button found on Code
Project web site. The only real reason for converting it is to modify
the code and you feel better doing so in VB.NET, otherwise language
doesn't matter.
Where such code snippets are small (and I haven't checked this one so I don't
know) I would always convert to the language I am already using (Normally
VB.Net).

The main reason for this is not that I don't like C#. (Although there are
some bits of it I am less keen on than others ;P )

It's more that I hate having to create additional projects/Dlls to house
code which logically belongs in a specific tier of my existing application.
My ideal scenario is to have a project ".VSProj" project type which would
accept code files of any recognised type and compile them down into one file.
Then I could mix Vb.Net and C# as appropriate to any given task without creating
new dlls all over the place.

I think I'm going to have to keep dreaming on this one though. MS has more
to gain bty the current situation. The more people who argue over VB vs C#
the less people there are considering Java etc :P

--
Rory
Jul 25 '07 #5

P: n/a
Completely understand :-)

I have not tried this but you might want to check it out, looks close to
what you are looking for but not exactly
http://www.planet-source-code.com/vb...3650&lngWId=10
"Rory Becker" <Ro********@newsgroup.nospamwrote in message
news:b0**************************@msnews.microsoft .com...
>Why convert it? Simply create your resulting DLL and reference it in
the IDE. This is what I did for a C# glassy button found on Code
Project web site. The only real reason for converting it is to modify
the code and you feel better doing so in VB.NET, otherwise language
doesn't matter.

Where such code snippets are small (and I haven't checked this one so I
don't know) I would always convert to the language I am already using
(Normally VB.Net).

The main reason for this is not that I don't like C#. (Although there are
some bits of it I am less keen on than others ;P )
It's more that I hate having to create additional projects/Dlls to house
code which logically belongs in a specific tier of my existing
application.
My ideal scenario is to have a project ".VSProj" project type which would
accept code files of any recognised type and compile them down into one
file. Then I could mix Vb.Net and C# as appropriate to any given task
without creating new dlls all over the place.
I think I'm going to have to keep dreaming on this one though. MS has more
to gain bty the current situation. The more people who argue over VB vs C#
the less people there are considering Java etc :P

--
Rory


Jul 25 '07 #6

P: n/a
Get the C# source you need and compile it. Then go and get Lutz Roeders
Refletor for .Net from here: http://www.aisto.com/roeder/dotnet load the C#
component then cut and paste the generated source into a new VB project.
There will be a few minor errors to correct, but not too many.

Regards
Neal

"Rory Becker" <Ro********@newsgroup.nospamwrote in message
news:b0**************************@msnews.microsoft .com...
>Why convert it? Simply create your resulting DLL and reference it in
the IDE. This is what I did for a C# glassy button found on Code
Project web site. The only real reason for converting it is to modify
the code and you feel better doing so in VB.NET, otherwise language
doesn't matter.

Where such code snippets are small (and I haven't checked this one so I
don't know) I would always convert to the language I am already using
(Normally VB.Net).

The main reason for this is not that I don't like C#. (Although there are
some bits of it I am less keen on than others ;P )
It's more that I hate having to create additional projects/Dlls to house
code which logically belongs in a specific tier of my existing
application.
My ideal scenario is to have a project ".VSProj" project type which would
accept code files of any recognised type and compile them down into one
file. Then I could mix Vb.Net and C# as appropriate to any given task
without creating new dlls all over the place.
I think I'm going to have to keep dreaming on this one though. MS has more
to gain bty the current situation. The more people who argue over VB vs C#
the less people there are considering Java etc :P

--
Rory

Jul 27 '07 #7

P: n/a
Tom
There is a MUCH easier way.
VB.NET to C#
http://www.developerfusion.co.uk/uti...btocsharp.aspx

and the other way around

C# to VB.NET
http://www.developerfusion.co.uk/uti...sharptovb.aspx

Neal wrote:
Get the C# source you need and compile it. Then go and get Lutz Roeders
Refletor for .Net from here: http://www.aisto.com/roeder/dotnet load the
C# component then cut and paste the generated source into a new VB
project. There will be a few minor errors to correct, but not too many.

Regards
Neal

"Rory Becker" <Ro********@newsgroup.nospamwrote in message
news:b0**************************@msnews.microsoft .com...
>>Why convert it? Simply create your resulting DLL and reference it in
the IDE. This is what I did for a C# glassy button found on Code
Project web site. The only real reason for converting it is to modify
the code and you feel better doing so in VB.NET, otherwise language
doesn't matter.

Where such code snippets are small (and I haven't checked this one so
I don't know) I would always convert to the language I am already
using (Normally VB.Net).

The main reason for this is not that I don't like C#. (Although there
are some bits of it I am less keen on than others ;P )
It's more that I hate having to create additional projects/Dlls to
house code which logically belongs in a specific tier of my existing
application.
My ideal scenario is to have a project ".VSProj" project type which
would accept code files of any recognised type and compile them down
into one file. Then I could mix Vb.Net and C# as appropriate to any
given task without creating new dlls all over the place.
I think I'm going to have to keep dreaming on this one though. MS has
more to gain bty the current situation. The more people who argue over
VB vs C# the less people there are considering Java etc :P

--
Rory

Jul 28 '07 #8

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