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How do I set initial Excel workbook name?

P: n/a
My VB.NET program pops up an Excel workbook for the user. If I
initially create the workbook using:

Workbooks.Add(Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.XlWBA Template.xlWBATWorksheet)

I end up with a workbook named "sheet1". If I use an existing
Excel file as a template, e.g.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls")

I end up with a workbook named "MyTemplateFile1".

Neither name is particularly appropriate, so I want to find a way
to set the workbook name myself when I first create the file.

You can always *get* the name using the Name property, but that
property is read-only, so you can't set the name that way. I can
of course save the file, using the SaveAs method, and set the name
to something new in the process. But I don't want to save the file
myself -- I want the user to look at the file, decide whether he
wants to keep it, and then decide where and under what name to save
it. I just want to give him an appropriate name to start with;
but if he doesn't like what he sees I would prefer the file never
be saved at all.

BTW, I think I can understand why you can't set the Name property
after the workbook has been created. While this would make sense
if -- as in my case -- the file exists only in memory, I can see
where it could give you problems if you are working with a file
that has already been saved to disk with a particular name. But
I don't see why I should be forced to accept an arbitrary default
name when no file yet exists on disk!
--
John Brock
jb****@panix.com

Feb 15 '07 #1
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10 Replies


P: n/a
How about after the workbook is opened

Workbooks(ThisWorkbook.Name).name = "My New workbook Name"

"John Brock" wrote:
My VB.NET program pops up an Excel workbook for the user. If I
initially create the workbook using:

Workbooks.Add(Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.XlWBA Template.xlWBATWorksheet)

I end up with a workbook named "sheet1". If I use an existing
Excel file as a template, e.g.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls")

I end up with a workbook named "MyTemplateFile1".

Neither name is particularly appropriate, so I want to find a way
to set the workbook name myself when I first create the file.

You can always *get* the name using the Name property, but that
property is read-only, so you can't set the name that way. I can
of course save the file, using the SaveAs method, and set the name
to something new in the process. But I don't want to save the file
myself -- I want the user to look at the file, decide whether he
wants to keep it, and then decide where and under what name to save
it. I just want to give him an appropriate name to start with;
but if he doesn't like what he sees I would prefer the file never
be saved at all.

BTW, I think I can understand why you can't set the Name property
after the workbook has been created. While this would make sense
if -- as in my case -- the file exists only in memory, I can see
where it could give you problems if you are working with a file
that has already been saved to disk with a particular name. But
I don't see why I should be forced to accept an arbitrary default
name when no file yet exists on disk!
--
John Brock
jb****@panix.com

Feb 15 '07 #2

P: n/a

The [name] property of the worksheet is *not* read-only. It is a property
of the worksheet. This property is what's displayed in the tab at the
bottom of a workbook.

I've used this in my code:

xlSheet = CType(xlBook.WorkSheets(1), Excel.WorkSheet)
xlSheet.Activate()
xlSheet.Name = "blah blah"

xlBook is my current workbook.

Robin S.
-----------------------------------------
"John Brock" <jb****@panix.comwrote in message
news:er**********@reader2.panix.com...
My VB.NET program pops up an Excel workbook for the user. If I
initially create the workbook using:

Workbooks.Add(Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.XlWBA Template.xlWBATWorksheet)

I end up with a workbook named "sheet1". If I use an existing
Excel file as a template, e.g.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls")

I end up with a workbook named "MyTemplateFile1".

Neither name is particularly appropriate, so I want to find a way
to set the workbook name myself when I first create the file.

You can always *get* the name using the Name property, but that
property is read-only, so you can't set the name that way. I can
of course save the file, using the SaveAs method, and set the name
to something new in the process. But I don't want to save the file
myself -- I want the user to look at the file, decide whether he
wants to keep it, and then decide where and under what name to save
it. I just want to give him an appropriate name to start with;
but if he doesn't like what he sees I would prefer the file never
be saved at all.

BTW, I think I can understand why you can't set the Name property
after the workbook has been created. While this would make sense
if -- as in my case -- the file exists only in memory, I can see
where it could give you problems if you are working with a file
that has already been saved to disk with a particular name. But
I don't see why I should be forced to accept an arbitrary default
name when no file yet exists on disk!
--
John Brock
jb****@panix.com

Feb 15 '07 #3

P: n/a
John,

Your analysis is correct: there is no way of changing the name of a workbook
except by Saveas etc.

IMHO leaving the name of the book as Book1 is the best approach because the
user is more likely to recognise this as the name of a new unsaved workbook.
Thats what I usually do, and then I give any sheets I generate within the
workbook meaningful names.

regards
Charles
______________________
Decision Models
FastExcel 2.3 now available
Name Manager 4.0 now available
www.DecisionModels.com
Feb 15 '07 #4

P: n/a
Maybe you could rename the template file to something more significant before
you use it as the basis of your new workbook.

Then rename it back (or just leave it with the new nice name).

John Brock wrote:
>
My VB.NET program pops up an Excel workbook for the user. If I
initially create the workbook using:

Workbooks.Add(Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.XlWBA Template.xlWBATWorksheet)

I end up with a workbook named "sheet1". If I use an existing
Excel file as a template, e.g.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls")

I end up with a workbook named "MyTemplateFile1".

Neither name is particularly appropriate, so I want to find a way
to set the workbook name myself when I first create the file.

You can always *get* the name using the Name property, but that
property is read-only, so you can't set the name that way. I can
of course save the file, using the SaveAs method, and set the name
to something new in the process. But I don't want to save the file
myself -- I want the user to look at the file, decide whether he
wants to keep it, and then decide where and under what name to save
it. I just want to give him an appropriate name to start with;
but if he doesn't like what he sees I would prefer the file never
be saved at all.

BTW, I think I can understand why you can't set the Name property
after the workbook has been created. While this would make sense
if -- as in my case -- the file exists only in memory, I can see
where it could give you problems if you are working with a file
that has already been saved to disk with a particular name. But
I don't see why I should be forced to accept an arbitrary default
name when no file yet exists on disk!
--
John Brock
jb****@panix.com
--

Dave Peterson
Feb 15 '07 #5

P: n/a
You're right; I missed that he was looking at the workbook instead of the
worksheet.

Robin S.
----------------------------
"Charles Williams" <Ch*****@DecisionModels.comwrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
John,

Your analysis is correct: there is no way of changing the name of a
workbook except by Saveas etc.

IMHO leaving the name of the book as Book1 is the best approach because
the user is more likely to recognise this as the name of a new unsaved
workbook. Thats what I usually do, and then I give any sheets I generate
within the workbook meaningful names.

regards
Charles
______________________
Decision Models
FastExcel 2.3 now available
Name Manager 4.0 now available
www.DecisionModels.com

Feb 16 '07 #6

P: n/a
Here is one problem: Let's say I pick a nice new temporary name
for my template file, say, "BudgetReport.xls". When I create the
file the user will see it as "BudgetReport1", and when he saves it
the suggested name will be "BudgetReport1.xls". The user gets to
modify the name, so maybe he gets rid of that pointless "1". No
problem so far, but what if he runs the program again? This time
I can't rename my template file, because that nice new name is
already taken! I could code around that, and temporarily rename
both files, but frankly it's not a big enough problem to be worth
the bother.

Still, I think it's surprising that Microsoft doesn't allow the
programmer to control such a visible piece of text. The obvious
solution would be an optional parameter to the Add method, i.e.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls", Name:="BudgetReport")

I don't see any way this could cause any problems -- any Microsofties
out there listening? :-)

In article <45***************@verizonXSPAM.net>,
Dave Peterson <pe******@verizonXSPAM.netwrote:
>Maybe you could rename the template file to something more significant before
you use it as the basis of your new workbook.

Then rename it back (or just leave it with the new nice name).
>John Brock wrote:
>>
My VB.NET program pops up an Excel workbook for the user. If I
initially create the workbook using:

Workbooks.Add(Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.XlWB ATemplate.xlWBATWorksheet)

I end up with a workbook named "sheet1". If I use an existing
Excel file as a template, e.g.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls")

I end up with a workbook named "MyTemplateFile1".

Neither name is particularly appropriate, so I want to find a way
to set the workbook name myself when I first create the file.

You can always *get* the name using the Name property, but that
property is read-only, so you can't set the name that way. I can
of course save the file, using the SaveAs method, and set the name
to something new in the process. But I don't want to save the file
myself -- I want the user to look at the file, decide whether he
wants to keep it, and then decide where and under what name to save
it. I just want to give him an appropriate name to start with;
but if he doesn't like what he sees I would prefer the file never
be saved at all.

BTW, I think I can understand why you can't set the Name property
after the workbook has been created. While this would make sense
if -- as in my case -- the file exists only in memory, I can see
where it could give you problems if you are working with a file
that has already been saved to disk with a particular name. But
I don't see why I should be forced to accept an arbitrary default
name when no file yet exists on disk!
--
John Brock
jb****@panix.com

Feb 16 '07 #7

P: n/a
I doubt that anyone from MS will find your message and read it.

This is usually users helping users--every once in awhile, you'll see someone
from MS, but it's pretty rare.

Maybe you could add code that saves the file (or just prompts the user to save
the file) as soon as you create the file???

Then you can use any name you or the user wants.

John Brock wrote:
>
Here is one problem: Let's say I pick a nice new temporary name
for my template file, say, "BudgetReport.xls". When I create the
file the user will see it as "BudgetReport1", and when he saves it
the suggested name will be "BudgetReport1.xls". The user gets to
modify the name, so maybe he gets rid of that pointless "1". No
problem so far, but what if he runs the program again? This time
I can't rename my template file, because that nice new name is
already taken! I could code around that, and temporarily rename
both files, but frankly it's not a big enough problem to be worth
the bother.

Still, I think it's surprising that Microsoft doesn't allow the
programmer to control such a visible piece of text. The obvious
solution would be an optional parameter to the Add method, i.e.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls", Name:="BudgetReport")

I don't see any way this could cause any problems -- any Microsofties
out there listening? :-)

In article <45***************@verizonXSPAM.net>,
Dave Peterson <pe******@verizonXSPAM.netwrote:
Maybe you could rename the template file to something more significant before
you use it as the basis of your new workbook.

Then rename it back (or just leave it with the new nice name).
John Brock wrote:
>
My VB.NET program pops up an Excel workbook for the user. If I
initially create the workbook using:

Workbooks.Add(Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.XlWBA Template.xlWBATWorksheet)

I end up with a workbook named "sheet1". If I use an existing
Excel file as a template, e.g.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls")

I end up with a workbook named "MyTemplateFile1".

Neither name is particularly appropriate, so I want to find a way
to set the workbook name myself when I first create the file.

You can always *get* the name using the Name property, but that
property is read-only, so you can't set the name that way. I can
of course save the file, using the SaveAs method, and set the name
to something new in the process. But I don't want to save the file
myself -- I want the user to look at the file, decide whether he
wants to keep it, and then decide where and under what name to save
it. I just want to give him an appropriate name to start with;
but if he doesn't like what he sees I would prefer the file never
be saved at all.

BTW, I think I can understand why you can't set the Name property
after the workbook has been created. While this would make sense
if -- as in my case -- the file exists only in memory, I can see
where it could give you problems if you are working with a file
that has already been saved to disk with a particular name. But
I don't see why I should be forced to accept an arbitrary default
name when no file yet exists on disk!
--
John Brock
jb****@panix.com
--

Dave Peterson
Feb 16 '07 #8

P: n/a
MS only answers q's in the dotnet newsgroups for its MSDN subscribers.

Just FYI.
Robin S.
--------------------
"Dave Peterson" <pe******@verizonXSPAM.netwrote in message
news:45***************@verizonXSPAM.net...
>I doubt that anyone from MS will find your message and read it.

This is usually users helping users--every once in awhile, you'll see
someone
from MS, but it's pretty rare.

Maybe you could add code that saves the file (or just prompts the user to
save
the file) as soon as you create the file???

Then you can use any name you or the user wants.

John Brock wrote:
>>
Here is one problem: Let's say I pick a nice new temporary name
for my template file, say, "BudgetReport.xls". When I create the
file the user will see it as "BudgetReport1", and when he saves it
the suggested name will be "BudgetReport1.xls". The user gets to
modify the name, so maybe he gets rid of that pointless "1". No
problem so far, but what if he runs the program again? This time
I can't rename my template file, because that nice new name is
already taken! I could code around that, and temporarily rename
both files, but frankly it's not a big enough problem to be worth
the bother.

Still, I think it's surprising that Microsoft doesn't allow the
programmer to control such a visible piece of text. The obvious
solution would be an optional parameter to the Add method, i.e.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls", Name:="BudgetReport")

I don't see any way this could cause any problems -- any Microsofties
out there listening? :-)

In article <45***************@verizonXSPAM.net>,
Dave Peterson <pe******@verizonXSPAM.netwrote:
>Maybe you could rename the template file to something more significant
before
you use it as the basis of your new workbook.

Then rename it back (or just leave it with the new nice name).
>John Brock wrote:

My VB.NET program pops up an Excel workbook for the user. If I
initially create the workbook using:

Workbooks.Add(Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.XlWB ATemplate.xlWBATWorksheet)

I end up with a workbook named "sheet1". If I use an existing
Excel file as a template, e.g.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls")

I end up with a workbook named "MyTemplateFile1".

Neither name is particularly appropriate, so I want to find a way
to set the workbook name myself when I first create the file.

You can always *get* the name using the Name property, but that
property is read-only, so you can't set the name that way. I can
of course save the file, using the SaveAs method, and set the name
to something new in the process. But I don't want to save the file
myself -- I want the user to look at the file, decide whether he
wants to keep it, and then decide where and under what name to save
it. I just want to give him an appropriate name to start with;
but if he doesn't like what he sees I would prefer the file never
be saved at all.

BTW, I think I can understand why you can't set the Name property
after the workbook has been created. While this would make sense
if -- as in my case -- the file exists only in memory, I can see
where it could give you problems if you are working with a file
that has already been saved to disk with a particular name. But
I don't see why I should be forced to accept an arbitrary default
name when no file yet exists on disk!
--
John Brock
jb****@panix.com

--

Dave Peterson

Feb 16 '07 #9

P: n/a
Every once in awhile, there'll be a response from MS employees. But it's pretty
rare (at least in the .public excel newsgroups).

RobinS wrote:
>
MS only answers q's in the dotnet newsgroups for its MSDN subscribers.

Just FYI.
Robin S.
--------------------
"Dave Peterson" <pe******@verizonXSPAM.netwrote in message
news:45***************@verizonXSPAM.net...
I doubt that anyone from MS will find your message and read it.

This is usually users helping users--every once in awhile, you'll see
someone
from MS, but it's pretty rare.

Maybe you could add code that saves the file (or just prompts the user to
save
the file) as soon as you create the file???

Then you can use any name you or the user wants.

John Brock wrote:
>
Here is one problem: Let's say I pick a nice new temporary name
for my template file, say, "BudgetReport.xls". When I create the
file the user will see it as "BudgetReport1", and when he saves it
the suggested name will be "BudgetReport1.xls". The user gets to
modify the name, so maybe he gets rid of that pointless "1". No
problem so far, but what if he runs the program again? This time
I can't rename my template file, because that nice new name is
already taken! I could code around that, and temporarily rename
both files, but frankly it's not a big enough problem to be worth
the bother.

Still, I think it's surprising that Microsoft doesn't allow the
programmer to control such a visible piece of text. The obvious
solution would be an optional parameter to the Add method, i.e.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls", Name:="BudgetReport")

I don't see any way this could cause any problems -- any Microsofties
out there listening? :-)

In article <45***************@verizonXSPAM.net>,
Dave Peterson <pe******@verizonXSPAM.netwrote:
Maybe you could rename the template file to something more significant
before
you use it as the basis of your new workbook.

Then rename it back (or just leave it with the new nice name).

John Brock wrote:

My VB.NET program pops up an Excel workbook for the user. If I
initially create the workbook using:

Workbooks.Add(Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.XlWBA Template.xlWBATWorksheet)

I end up with a workbook named "sheet1". If I use an existing
Excel file as a template, e.g.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls")

I end up with a workbook named "MyTemplateFile1".

Neither name is particularly appropriate, so I want to find a way
to set the workbook name myself when I first create the file.

You can always *get* the name using the Name property, but that
property is read-only, so you can't set the name that way. I can
of course save the file, using the SaveAs method, and set the name
to something new in the process. But I don't want to save the file
myself -- I want the user to look at the file, decide whether he
wants to keep it, and then decide where and under what name to save
it. I just want to give him an appropriate name to start with;
but if he doesn't like what he sees I would prefer the file never
be saved at all.

BTW, I think I can understand why you can't set the Name property
after the workbook has been created. While this would make sense
if -- as in my case -- the file exists only in memory, I can see
where it could give you problems if you are working with a file
that has already been saved to disk with a particular name. But
I don't see why I should be forced to accept an arbitrary default
name when no file yet exists on disk!
--
John Brock
jb****@panix.com
--

Dave Peterson
--

Dave Peterson
Feb 16 '07 #10

P: n/a
Yes, you're right, I have seen one guy (Nick?) who's a MSFT employee who
answers in the groups, but not *because* he's a MSFT employee. But the ones
that people see from Linda Liu and Wen whatshisname are because people are
paying for the privilege of getting answers in the managed newsgroups.

Robin S.
-----------------------------
"Dave Peterson" <pe******@verizonXSPAM.netwrote in message
news:45***************@verizonXSPAM.net...
Every once in awhile, there'll be a response from MS employees. But it's
pretty
rare (at least in the .public excel newsgroups).

RobinS wrote:
>>
MS only answers q's in the dotnet newsgroups for its MSDN subscribers.

Just FYI.
Robin S.
--------------------
"Dave Peterson" <pe******@verizonXSPAM.netwrote in message
news:45***************@verizonXSPAM.net...
>I doubt that anyone from MS will find your message and read it.

This is usually users helping users--every once in awhile, you'll see
someone
from MS, but it's pretty rare.

Maybe you could add code that saves the file (or just prompts the user
to
save
the file) as soon as you create the file???

Then you can use any name you or the user wants.

John Brock wrote:

Here is one problem: Let's say I pick a nice new temporary name
for my template file, say, "BudgetReport.xls". When I create the
file the user will see it as "BudgetReport1", and when he saves it
the suggested name will be "BudgetReport1.xls". The user gets to
modify the name, so maybe he gets rid of that pointless "1". No
problem so far, but what if he runs the program again? This time
I can't rename my template file, because that nice new name is
already taken! I could code around that, and temporarily rename
both files, but frankly it's not a big enough problem to be worth
the bother.

Still, I think it's surprising that Microsoft doesn't allow the
programmer to control such a visible piece of text. The obvious
solution would be an optional parameter to the Add method, i.e.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls", Name:="BudgetReport")

I don't see any way this could cause any problems -- any Microsofties
out there listening? :-)

In article <45***************@verizonXSPAM.net>,
Dave Peterson <pe******@verizonXSPAM.netwrote:
Maybe you could rename the template file to something more
significant
before
you use it as the basis of your new workbook.

Then rename it back (or just leave it with the new nice name).

John Brock wrote:

My VB.NET program pops up an Excel workbook for the user. If I
initially create the workbook using:

Workbooks.Add(Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.XlWB ATemplate.xlWBATWorksheet)

I end up with a workbook named "sheet1". If I use an existing
Excel file as a template, e.g.:

Workbooks.Add("C:\temp\MyTemplateFile.xls")

I end up with a workbook named "MyTemplateFile1".

Neither name is particularly appropriate, so I want to find a way
to set the workbook name myself when I first create the file.

You can always *get* the name using the Name property, but that
property is read-only, so you can't set the name that way. I can
of course save the file, using the SaveAs method, and set the name
to something new in the process. But I don't want to save the
file
myself -- I want the user to look at the file, decide whether he
wants to keep it, and then decide where and under what name to
save
it. I just want to give him an appropriate name to start with;
but if he doesn't like what he sees I would prefer the file never
be saved at all.

BTW, I think I can understand why you can't set the Name property
after the workbook has been created. While this would make sense
if -- as in my case -- the file exists only in memory, I can see
where it could give you problems if you are working with a file
that has already been saved to disk with a particular name. But
I don't see why I should be forced to accept an arbitrary default
name when no file yet exists on disk!
--
John Brock
jb****@panix.com

--

Dave Peterson

--

Dave Peterson

Feb 16 '07 #11

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.