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GOOD BOOKS OF VB2005

Hi friends, I am begginer , I wanna to learn VB2005 ,Which are good book for
to learn VB2005 of level -begginer-intermediate.
Thanks you friends.

Dec 17 '06 #1
7 1443
I'm starting into a book called Beginning Visual Basic 2005 by Thearon and
Newsome. Looks to have a lot of really good information in it and it doesn't
appear to be too far over my head, so I should learn something from it. :)
Maybe it'll help you as well.

"TAVOSOFT" <u30299@uwewrote in message news:6adff78307980@uwe...
Hi friends, I am begginer , I wanna to learn VB2005 ,Which are good book
for
to learn VB2005 of level -begginer-intermediate.
Thanks you friends.

Dec 17 '06 #2
Hi,

You might want to look at the MSDN site, there is an offer for two free
books for learning Visual Basic 2005:

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/vbrun/ms788234.aspx

And here is the direct link to "Introducing Microsoft Visual Basic 2005 for
Developers":

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/vbrun/ms788235.aspx

It is a good introduction book for learning Visual Basic 2005 with various
code samples.

Regards,

Plamen Ratchev
http://www.SQLStudio.com
"TAVOSOFT" <u30299@uwewrote in message news:6adff78307980@uwe...
Hi friends, I am begginer , I wanna to learn VB2005 ,Which are good book
for
to learn VB2005 of level -begginer-intermediate.
Thanks you friends.

Dec 17 '06 #3

Hey, I read that book. I liked it, but there were some, um, errors
in it. They don't have Option Strict On, and if you want to code
with that (which generally you do), you have to learn how to use
DirectCast and/or CType pretty early on. There are some other
errors in it too; I recommend you read the Errata online, or you'll
be vexed if you try to type in some of the examples. I picked up a
lot more info from that book than I realized; most of it was
definitely worth going through.

After you read that one, check out Francesco Balena's "VB2005: The
Language" -- it covers *only* the language, no forms, no data.
It has some neat stuff in it.

And for data, I recommend David Sceppa's ADO.Net book. Lots of
examples, lots of code.

Robin S.
--------------------------------------------
"Bruce W. Darby" <kr****@comcast.netwrote in message
news:gL******************************@comcast.com. ..
I'm starting into a book called Beginning Visual Basic 2005 by Thearon
and Newsome. Looks to have a lot of really good information in it and
it doesn't appear to be too far over my head, so I should learn
something from it. :) Maybe it'll help you as well.

"TAVOSOFT" <u30299@uwewrote in message news:6adff78307980@uwe...
>Hi friends, I am begginer , I wanna to learn VB2005 ,Which are good
book for
to learn VB2005 of level -begginer-intermediate.
Thanks you friends.


Dec 17 '06 #4
Thanks Robin,

I actually started my .Net experience reading a couple of books by John
Smiley. They are very basic beginners books, but they got my head wrapped
around some of the ideas used in VB.Net. And when I tried to apply my .Net
learning to an earlier book he had written on Objects, I realized that I
need a LOT of help. :) I never go into a book any longer expecting it to be
perfect. I like that as it then presents me with an opportunity to actually
learn something about error correction. Hopefully, I'll be able to learn
this stuff fast enough to be able to do some good things before I retire. :)

Thanks again,
Bruce

P.S. I'll keep my eye out for those other two books you suggested

"RobinS" <Ro****@NoSpam.yah.nonewrote in message
news:Bp******************************@comcast.com. ..
>
Hey, I read that book. I liked it, but there were some, um, errors
in it. They don't have Option Strict On, and if you want to code
with that (which generally you do), you have to learn how to use
DirectCast and/or CType pretty early on. There are some other
errors in it too; I recommend you read the Errata online, or you'll
be vexed if you try to type in some of the examples. I picked up a
lot more info from that book than I realized; most of it was
definitely worth going through.

Dec 17 '06 #5
That's interesting. He doesn't have a 2005 version. At any rate,
they're probably too basic for me at this point.

The book that really cemented it all for me was Deborah Kurata's
"Doing Objects in VB2005". This talks about the 3-layer approach,
how to set up the Business objects, binding them to the controls
on the forms, and has a bunch of neat basic info that I see asked
in this ng a lot, like how to save settings, how to iterate
through controls, how to use code snippets, etc. Unfortunately,
it's not generally available until March '07.

I'm reading Tim Patrick's Start-to-Finish VB2005. It has a lot
of information in it. There is a *huge* amount of code, and at
times it's almost overwhelming. I can't work on it continuously,
and since I didn't design the application he is building, I'm
having a bit of trouble keeping the details in my mind, so I
finally let that go, and am happily going through the rest of
it. It's very readable, and will be something I come back to
in the future for some keen examples of UI design and how-to
information. It's different from other books in that you end
up building an entire app -- sort of; you use code snippets to
insert the code, and can then peruse it at your leisure.

With Ms. Kurata's book, you also built an entire working app.
It was not as full-featured as Mr. Patrick's, but really helped
me understand classes, inheritance, and (as I said before), the
3-layer model.

I haven't found any great books about WinForms, although the
best book about data binding is by Brian Noyes. Unfortunately,
it's in C#, although he has downloadable examples in VB. He
has some great stuff in there, especially about the DataGridView,
and the added benefit I got from it is that now I'm better at
reading C#. ;-)

Happy reading to all, and to all a good night!

Robin S.
-------------------------------------

"Bruce W. Darby" <kr****@comcast.netwrote in message
news:lY******************************@comcast.com. ..
Thanks Robin,

I actually started my .Net experience reading a couple of books by
John Smiley. They are very basic beginners books, but they got my head
wrapped around some of the ideas used in VB.Net. And when I tried to
apply my .Net learning to an earlier book he had written on Objects, I
realized that I need a LOT of help. :) I never go into a book any
longer expecting it to be perfect. I like that as it then presents me
with an opportunity to actually learn something about error
correction. Hopefully, I'll be able to learn this stuff fast enough to
be able to do some good things before I retire. :)

Thanks again,
Bruce

P.S. I'll keep my eye out for those other two books you suggested

"RobinS" <Ro****@NoSpam.yah.nonewrote in message
news:Bp******************************@comcast.com. ..
>>
Hey, I read that book. I liked it, but there were some, um, errors
in it. They don't have Option Strict On, and if you want to code
with that (which generally you do), you have to learn how to use
DirectCast and/or CType pretty early on. There are some other
errors in it too; I recommend you read the Errata online, or you'll
be vexed if you try to type in some of the examples. I picked up a
lot more info from that book than I realized; most of it was
definitely worth going through.


Dec 17 '06 #6
Hi Robin.

I am thinking to buy you book Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005: Learn Visual
Basic 2005 as You Design and Develop a Complete Application.

I wanna Knows if the application (the library) is complete and perfectly
functional and free of errors?

The design of the application is showed complete and step by step in the book
?

Thanks you

Gustavo from Colombia.
RobinS wrote:
>That's interesting. He doesn't have a 2005 version. At any rate,
they're probably too basic for me at this point.

The book that really cemented it all for me was Deborah Kurata's
"Doing Objects in VB2005". This talks about the 3-layer approach,
how to set up the Business objects, binding them to the controls
on the forms, and has a bunch of neat basic info that I see asked
in this ng a lot, like how to save settings, how to iterate
through controls, how to use code snippets, etc. Unfortunately,
it's not generally available until March '07.

I'm reading Tim Patrick's Start-to-Finish VB2005. It has a lot
of information in it. There is a *huge* amount of code, and at
times it's almost overwhelming. I can't work on it continuously,
and since I didn't design the application he is building, I'm
having a bit of trouble keeping the details in my mind, so I
finally let that go, and am happily going through the rest of
it. It's very readable, and will be something I come back to
in the future for some keen examples of UI design and how-to
information. It's different from other books in that you end
up building an entire app -- sort of; you use code snippets to
insert the code, and can then peruse it at your leisure.

With Ms. Kurata's book, you also built an entire working app.
It was not as full-featured as Mr. Patrick's, but really helped
me understand classes, inheritance, and (as I said before), the
3-layer model.

I haven't found any great books about WinForms, although the
best book about data binding is by Brian Noyes. Unfortunately,
it's in C#, although he has downloadable examples in VB. He
has some great stuff in there, especially about the DataGridView,
and the added benefit I got from it is that now I'm better at
reading C#. ;-)

Happy reading to all, and to all a good night!

Robin S.
-------------------------------------
>Thanks Robin,
[quoted text clipped - 21 lines]
>>lot more info from that book than I realized; most of it was
definitely worth going through.
--
Message posted via DotNetMonster.com
http://www.dotnetmonster.com/Uwe/For...b-net/200612/1

Dec 26 '06 #7
(Also posted in microsoft.public.dotnet.general).

I think the book is really good. I'm in chapter 18 (3/4 of the way
through the book, about 90%+ of
the code done, according to the author). (I'm reading a couple of other
books at the same time,
and my head may explode any day now.) I think the book explains most
things well. It has a lot
of humor in it, which makes it a lot less dry than other books.

There is a *lot* of code. The author has you use code snippets to add
the code, which
is clever. I sort of wish he would explain more. For example, in the
GDI+ chapter, he shows a
lot of commands to create stuff, but doesn't explain what all the
parameters mean. On the
other hand, it is easily looked up in MSDN.

So far, I have only found one error, and it was in some sample code
where he shows
how to put graphics in a ComboBox, not in the actual project code. The
only problem
with it was he needed to cast a couple of calculated values to Single,
so it was easy
to fix.

The only problem I've had with his code is that the screens draw funny
on my
computer. Some of them are chopped off at the bottom. I'm going to post
a
question about that to the dotnet.windowforms newsgroup as soon as I get
around
to it. The author said neither he nor any of the tech reviewers had that
problem,
so in all likelihood it's something about my display settings.

The only other "issue" one might have with the book is that it doesn't
follow the n-layer
design methodology, and doesn't always follow standard practices, like
in the naming
of the controls. On the other hand, you might argue that as long as an
entire application
follows its own standards consistently, that's okay. It might be that
that's okay for
small business desktop applications. Aside from this, there's still a
lot of good
information in the book.

Overall, I'd have to say I learned a lot from reading the book, and will
come back to it
in the future. I'm kind of impatient, so I didn't stop to figure out
every single line of
code that was added to the project; I figured I could come back to those
sections
when I needed to in the future. It's important to know what the
possibilities are, so
I can use those ideas in designing future applications. I can always
look up the details.

My two cents' worth.
Robin S.
------------------------------------------------
"TAVOSOFT via DotNetMonster.com" <u30299@uwewrote in message
news:6b5c1286f9048@uwe...
Hi Robin.

I am thinking to buy you book Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005: Learn
Visual
Basic 2005 as You Design and Develop a Complete Application.

I wanna Knows if the application (the library) is complete and
perfectly
functional and free of errors?

The design of the application is showed complete and step by step in
the book
?

Thanks you

Gustavo from Colombia.
RobinS wrote:
>>That's interesting. He doesn't have a 2005 version. At any rate,
they're probably too basic for me at this point.

The book that really cemented it all for me was Deborah Kurata's
"Doing Objects in VB2005". This talks about the 3-layer approach,
how to set up the Business objects, binding them to the controls
on the forms, and has a bunch of neat basic info that I see asked
in this ng a lot, like how to save settings, how to iterate
through controls, how to use code snippets, etc. Unfortunately,
it's not generally available until March '07.

I'm reading Tim Patrick's Start-to-Finish VB2005. It has a lot
of information in it. There is a *huge* amount of code, and at
times it's almost overwhelming. I can't work on it continuously,
and since I didn't design the application he is building, I'm
having a bit of trouble keeping the details in my mind, so I
finally let that go, and am happily going through the rest of
it. It's very readable, and will be something I come back to
in the future for some keen examples of UI design and how-to
information. It's different from other books in that you end
up building an entire app -- sort of; you use code snippets to
insert the code, and can then peruse it at your leisure.

With Ms. Kurata's book, you also built an entire working app.
It was not as full-featured as Mr. Patrick's, but really helped
me understand classes, inheritance, and (as I said before), the
3-layer model.

I haven't found any great books about WinForms, although the
best book about data binding is by Brian Noyes. Unfortunately,
it's in C#, although he has downloadable examples in VB. He
has some great stuff in there, especially about the DataGridView,
and the added benefit I got from it is that now I'm better at
reading C#. ;-)

Happy reading to all, and to all a good night!

Robin S.
-------------------------------------
>>Thanks Robin,
[quoted text clipped - 21 lines]
>>>lot more info from that book than I realized; most of it was
definitely worth going through.

--
Message posted via DotNetMonster.com
http://www.dotnetmonster.com/Uwe/For...b-net/200612/1

Dec 27 '06 #8

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