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I need 2-3 books on VB.NET, Office automation. Any suggestions?

P: n/a
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie). Currently I am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a bit of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander

Nov 20 '06 #1
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12 Replies


P: n/a
I don't know what version of VB.Net you're using. I really
like Francesco Balena's book on VB:The Language. It only
covers the language, not the forms or data. I have the 2005
version, but he has earlier versions as well. This isn't
really a book for someone who's never done .Net; in each
section, he goes from simple examples to complex info
pretty quickly. I learned a lot from reading this book.

He also has a Standard Practices book that I found a lot
of neat information in.

For data binding, check out Brian Noyes's book.

If you want to know how to write a whole app, check out
Tim Patrick's new book, Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005.
I have it on order, so I can't vouch for it personally,
but there is a good review on amazon, and chapter 1 was
pretty interesting.

Hope that helps.
Robin S.
----------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie). Currently I am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a bit of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander

Nov 20 '06 #2

P: n/a
Thanks Robin (I use 2005 VB.NET), I appriciate the recomendations, and
will get them ordered.

Tomas :)
RobinS wrote:
I don't know what version of VB.Net you're using. I really
like Francesco Balena's book on VB:The Language. It only
covers the language, not the forms or data. I have the 2005
version, but he has earlier versions as well. This isn't
really a book for someone who's never done .Net; in each
section, he goes from simple examples to complex info
pretty quickly. I learned a lot from reading this book.

He also has a Standard Practices book that I found a lot
of neat information in.

For data binding, check out Brian Noyes's book.

If you want to know how to write a whole app, check out
Tim Patrick's new book, Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005.
I have it on order, so I can't vouch for it personally,
but there is a good review on amazon, and chapter 1 was
pretty interesting.

Hope that helps.
Robin S.
----------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie). Currently I am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a bit of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander
Nov 22 '06 #3

P: n/a
You're welcome. My copy of Tim Patrick's book came in
the mail yesterday; it looks really good. I'm looking
forward to reading it.

BTW, I don't know of any Office automation books; if
you find one, please let us know. I usually do it by
trial & error. Most of my stuff is Excel, although I've
mucked a little with Outlook and Word.

Robin S.
------------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@h48g2000cwc.googlegr oups.com...
Thanks Robin (I use 2005 VB.NET), I appriciate the recomendations, and
will get them ordered.

Tomas :)
RobinS wrote:
>I don't know what version of VB.Net you're using. I really
like Francesco Balena's book on VB:The Language. It only
covers the language, not the forms or data. I have the 2005
version, but he has earlier versions as well. This isn't
really a book for someone who's never done .Net; in each
section, he goes from simple examples to complex info
pretty quickly. I learned a lot from reading this book.

He also has a Standard Practices book that I found a lot
of neat information in.

For data binding, check out Brian Noyes's book.

If you want to know how to write a whole app, check out
Tim Patrick's new book, Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005.
I have it on order, so I can't vouch for it personally,
but there is a good review on amazon, and chapter 1 was
pretty interesting.

Hope that helps.
Robin S.
----------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googleg roups.com...
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie). Currently I am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a bit of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander

Nov 22 '06 #4

P: n/a
I'd look for VSTO books.. or are you talking about VBA?

-Aaron

RobinS wrote:
You're welcome. My copy of Tim Patrick's book came in
the mail yesterday; it looks really good. I'm looking
forward to reading it.

BTW, I don't know of any Office automation books; if
you find one, please let us know. I usually do it by
trial & error. Most of my stuff is Excel, although I've
mucked a little with Outlook and Word.

Robin S.
------------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@h48g2000cwc.googlegr oups.com...
Thanks Robin (I use 2005 VB.NET), I appriciate the recomendations, and
will get them ordered.

Tomas :)
RobinS wrote:
I don't know what version of VB.Net you're using. I really
like Francesco Balena's book on VB:The Language. It only
covers the language, not the forms or data. I have the 2005
version, but he has earlier versions as well. This isn't
really a book for someone who's never done .Net; in each
section, he goes from simple examples to complex info
pretty quickly. I learned a lot from reading this book.

He also has a Standard Practices book that I found a lot
of neat information in.

For data binding, check out Brian Noyes's book.

If you want to know how to write a whole app, check out
Tim Patrick's new book, Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005.
I have it on order, so I can't vouch for it personally,
but there is a good review on amazon, and chapter 1 was
pretty interesting.

Hope that helps.
Robin S.
----------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie). Currently I am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a bit of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander
Nov 22 '06 #5

P: n/a
My guess is that he was talking about doing OLE Automation
from VB. I looked for books on that back when I was doing
VB6, but couldn't really find anything, so I figured it out
via trial&error, and macro-record-then-fix-the-code.

My problem with VSTO is that it's a separate product from
Visual Studio, and I'm not into paying that much money for
two of them, when I can generally come up with the same
result using OLE Automation.

Robin S.
-------------------------------
<aa*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@b28g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
I'd look for VSTO books.. or are you talking about VBA?

-Aaron

RobinS wrote:
>You're welcome. My copy of Tim Patrick's book came in
the mail yesterday; it looks really good. I'm looking
forward to reading it.

BTW, I don't know of any Office automation books; if
you find one, please let us know. I usually do it by
trial & error. Most of my stuff is Excel, although I've
mucked a little with Outlook and Word.

Robin S.
------------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@h48g2000cwc.googleg roups.com...
Thanks Robin (I use 2005 VB.NET), I appriciate the recomendations, and
will get them ordered.

Tomas :)
RobinS wrote:

I don't know what version of VB.Net you're using. I really
like Francesco Balena's book on VB:The Language. It only
covers the language, not the forms or data. I have the 2005
version, but he has earlier versions as well. This isn't
really a book for someone who's never done .Net; in each
section, he goes from simple examples to complex info
pretty quickly. I learned a lot from reading this book.

He also has a Standard Practices book that I found a lot
of neat information in.

For data binding, check out Brian Noyes's book.

If you want to know how to write a whole app, check out
Tim Patrick's new book, Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005.
I have it on order, so I can't vouch for it personally,
but there is a good review on amazon, and chapter 1 was
pretty interesting.

Hope that helps.
Robin S.
----------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googleg roups.com...
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie). Currently I
am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a bit of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander


Nov 22 '06 #6

P: n/a
Robin

Microsoft doesn't support using COM objects anymore; you should lose
the training wheels and start using VSTO

everybody is doing it :)

-Susie
RobinS wrote:
My guess is that he was talking about doing OLE Automation
from VB. I looked for books on that back when I was doing
VB6, but couldn't really find anything, so I figured it out
via trial&error, and macro-record-then-fix-the-code.

My problem with VSTO is that it's a separate product from
Visual Studio, and I'm not into paying that much money for
two of them, when I can generally come up with the same
result using OLE Automation.

Robin S.
-------------------------------
<aa*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@b28g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
I'd look for VSTO books.. or are you talking about VBA?

-Aaron

RobinS wrote:
You're welcome. My copy of Tim Patrick's book came in
the mail yesterday; it looks really good. I'm looking
forward to reading it.

BTW, I don't know of any Office automation books; if
you find one, please let us know. I usually do it by
trial & error. Most of my stuff is Excel, although I've
mucked a little with Outlook and Word.

Robin S.
------------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@h48g2000cwc.googlegr oups.com...
Thanks Robin (I use 2005 VB.NET), I appriciate the recomendations, and
will get them ordered.

Tomas :)
RobinS wrote:

I don't know what version of VB.Net you're using. I really
like Francesco Balena's book on VB:The Language. It only
covers the language, not the forms or data. I have the 2005
version, but he has earlier versions as well. This isn't
really a book for someone who's never done .Net; in each
section, he goes from simple examples to complex info
pretty quickly. I learned a lot from reading this book.

He also has a Standard Practices book that I found a lot
of neat information in.

For data binding, check out Brian Noyes's book.

If you want to know how to write a whole app, check out
Tim Patrick's new book, Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005.
I have it on order, so I can't vouch for it personally,
but there is a good review on amazon, and chapter 1 was
pretty interesting.

Hope that helps.
Robin S.
----------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie). Currently I
am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a bit of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander
Nov 22 '06 #7

P: n/a
no wonder you're such a crappy ass coder and you're stuck in VB

I've got 2 book shelves of Office Automation books.. typically books
about Excel 97 or Access 97 for example-- are the best resources--
because back in the 'good old days' microsoft didn't have a screwed up
marketing message..

-Larry Linson Jr

RobinS wrote:
My guess is that he was talking about doing OLE Automation
from VB. I looked for books on that back when I was doing
VB6, but couldn't really find anything, so I figured it out
via trial&error, and macro-record-then-fix-the-code.

My problem with VSTO is that it's a separate product from
Visual Studio, and I'm not into paying that much money for
two of them, when I can generally come up with the same
result using OLE Automation.

Robin S.
-------------------------------
<aa*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@b28g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
I'd look for VSTO books.. or are you talking about VBA?

-Aaron

RobinS wrote:
You're welcome. My copy of Tim Patrick's book came in
the mail yesterday; it looks really good. I'm looking
forward to reading it.

BTW, I don't know of any Office automation books; if
you find one, please let us know. I usually do it by
trial & error. Most of my stuff is Excel, although I've
mucked a little with Outlook and Word.

Robin S.
------------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@h48g2000cwc.googlegr oups.com...
Thanks Robin (I use 2005 VB.NET), I appriciate the recomendations, and
will get them ordered.

Tomas :)
RobinS wrote:

I don't know what version of VB.Net you're using. I really
like Francesco Balena's book on VB:The Language. It only
covers the language, not the forms or data. I have the 2005
version, but he has earlier versions as well. This isn't
really a book for someone who's never done .Net; in each
section, he goes from simple examples to complex info
pretty quickly. I learned a lot from reading this book.

He also has a Standard Practices book that I found a lot
of neat information in.

For data binding, check out Brian Noyes's book.

If you want to know how to write a whole app, check out
Tim Patrick's new book, Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005.
I have it on order, so I can't vouch for it personally,
but there is a good review on amazon, and chapter 1 was
pretty interesting.

Hope that helps.
Robin S.
----------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie). Currently I
am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a bit of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander
Nov 22 '06 #8

P: n/a
Are you calling *me* a crappy-ass coder? Interesting
how you can pass judgment on someone without even
knowing them.

Robin S.
-----------------------------
<la***********@hotmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
no wonder you're such a crappy ass coder and you're stuck in VB

I've got 2 book shelves of Office Automation books.. typically books
about Excel 97 or Access 97 for example-- are the best resources--
because back in the 'good old days' microsoft didn't have a screwed up
marketing message..

-Larry Linson Jr

RobinS wrote:
>My guess is that he was talking about doing OLE Automation
from VB. I looked for books on that back when I was doing
VB6, but couldn't really find anything, so I figured it out
via trial&error, and macro-record-then-fix-the-code.

My problem with VSTO is that it's a separate product from
Visual Studio, and I'm not into paying that much money for
two of them, when I can generally come up with the same
result using OLE Automation.

Robin S.
-------------------------------
<aa*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@b28g2000cwb.googleg roups.com...
I'd look for VSTO books.. or are you talking about VBA?

-Aaron

RobinS wrote:
You're welcome. My copy of Tim Patrick's book came in
the mail yesterday; it looks really good. I'm looking
forward to reading it.

BTW, I don't know of any Office automation books; if
you find one, please let us know. I usually do it by
trial & error. Most of my stuff is Excel, although I've
mucked a little with Outlook and Word.

Robin S.
------------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@h48g2000cwc.googleg roups.com...
Thanks Robin (I use 2005 VB.NET), I appriciate the recomendations,
and
will get them ordered.

Tomas :)
RobinS wrote:

I don't know what version of VB.Net you're using. I really
like Francesco Balena's book on VB:The Language. It only
covers the language, not the forms or data. I have the 2005
version, but he has earlier versions as well. This isn't
really a book for someone who's never done .Net; in each
section, he goes from simple examples to complex info
pretty quickly. I learned a lot from reading this book.

He also has a Standard Practices book that I found a lot
of neat information in.

For data binding, check out Brian Noyes's book.

If you want to know how to write a whole app, check out
Tim Patrick's new book, Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005.
I have it on order, so I can't vouch for it personally,
but there is a good review on amazon, and chapter 1 was
pretty interesting.

Hope that helps.
Robin S.
----------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googleg roups.com...
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie).
Currently I
am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a bit
of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly
appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander

Nov 22 '06 #9

P: n/a
well you're a woman and all women are crappy ass coders

-Susie, DBA
RobinS wrote:
Are you calling *me* a crappy-ass coder? Interesting
how you can pass judgment on someone without even
knowing them.

Robin S.
-----------------------------
<la***********@hotmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
no wonder you're such a crappy ass coder and you're stuck in VB

I've got 2 book shelves of Office Automation books.. typically books
about Excel 97 or Access 97 for example-- are the best resources--
because back in the 'good old days' microsoft didn't have a screwed up
marketing message..

-Larry Linson Jr

RobinS wrote:
My guess is that he was talking about doing OLE Automation
from VB. I looked for books on that back when I was doing
VB6, but couldn't really find anything, so I figured it out
via trial&error, and macro-record-then-fix-the-code.

My problem with VSTO is that it's a separate product from
Visual Studio, and I'm not into paying that much money for
two of them, when I can generally come up with the same
result using OLE Automation.

Robin S.
-------------------------------
<aa*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@b28g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
I'd look for VSTO books.. or are you talking about VBA?

-Aaron

RobinS wrote:
You're welcome. My copy of Tim Patrick's book came in
the mail yesterday; it looks really good. I'm looking
forward to reading it.

BTW, I don't know of any Office automation books; if
you find one, please let us know. I usually do it by
trial & error. Most of my stuff is Excel, although I've
mucked a little with Outlook and Word.

Robin S.
------------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@h48g2000cwc.googlegr oups.com...
Thanks Robin (I use 2005 VB.NET), I appriciate the recomendations,
and
will get them ordered.

Tomas :)
RobinS wrote:

I don't know what version of VB.Net you're using. I really
like Francesco Balena's book on VB:The Language. It only
covers the language, not the forms or data. I have the 2005
version, but he has earlier versions as well. This isn't
really a book for someone who's never done .Net; in each
section, he goes from simple examples to complex info
pretty quickly. I learned a lot from reading this book.

He also has a Standard Practices book that I found a lot
of neat information in.

For data binding, check out Brian Noyes's book.

If you want to know how to write a whole app, check out
Tim Patrick's new book, Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005.
I have it on order, so I can't vouch for it personally,
but there is a good review on amazon, and chapter 1 was
pretty interesting.

Hope that helps.
Robin S.
----------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie).
Currently I
am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a bit
of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly
appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander

Nov 27 '06 #10

P: n/a
and you're the one that couldn't 'find a book on VBA automation'

if your search skills and your logic skills are flawed; then you MUST
be a crappy ass coder

-Susie, DBA

RobinS wrote:
Are you calling *me* a crappy-ass coder? Interesting
how you can pass judgment on someone without even
knowing them.

Robin S.
-----------------------------
<la***********@hotmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
no wonder you're such a crappy ass coder and you're stuck in VB

I've got 2 book shelves of Office Automation books.. typically books
about Excel 97 or Access 97 for example-- are the best resources--
because back in the 'good old days' microsoft didn't have a screwed up
marketing message..

-Larry Linson Jr

RobinS wrote:
My guess is that he was talking about doing OLE Automation
from VB. I looked for books on that back when I was doing
VB6, but couldn't really find anything, so I figured it out
via trial&error, and macro-record-then-fix-the-code.

My problem with VSTO is that it's a separate product from
Visual Studio, and I'm not into paying that much money for
two of them, when I can generally come up with the same
result using OLE Automation.

Robin S.
-------------------------------
<aa*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@b28g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
I'd look for VSTO books.. or are you talking about VBA?

-Aaron

RobinS wrote:
You're welcome. My copy of Tim Patrick's book came in
the mail yesterday; it looks really good. I'm looking
forward to reading it.

BTW, I don't know of any Office automation books; if
you find one, please let us know. I usually do it by
trial & error. Most of my stuff is Excel, although I've
mucked a little with Outlook and Word.

Robin S.
------------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@h48g2000cwc.googlegr oups.com...
Thanks Robin (I use 2005 VB.NET), I appriciate the recomendations,
and
will get them ordered.

Tomas :)
RobinS wrote:

I don't know what version of VB.Net you're using. I really
like Francesco Balena's book on VB:The Language. It only
covers the language, not the forms or data. I have the 2005
version, but he has earlier versions as well. This isn't
really a book for someone who's never done .Net; in each
section, he goes from simple examples to complex info
pretty quickly. I learned a lot from reading this book.

He also has a Standard Practices book that I found a lot
of neat information in.

For data binding, check out Brian Noyes's book.

If you want to know how to write a whole app, check out
Tim Patrick's new book, Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005.
I have it on order, so I can't vouch for it personally,
but there is a good review on amazon, and chapter 1 was
pretty interesting.

Hope that helps.
Robin S.
----------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie).
Currently I
am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a bit
of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly
appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander

Nov 27 '06 #11

P: n/a
There you go, making assumptions again. LOL.

Robin S.
------------------------------------
<su******@hotmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@n67g2000cwd.googlegr oups.com...
well you're a woman and all women are crappy ass coders

-Susie, DBA
RobinS wrote:
>Are you calling *me* a crappy-ass coder? Interesting
how you can pass judgment on someone without even
knowing them.

Robin S.
-----------------------------
<la***********@hotmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googleg roups.com...
no wonder you're such a crappy ass coder and you're stuck in VB

I've got 2 book shelves of Office Automation books.. typically books
about Excel 97 or Access 97 for example-- are the best resources--
because back in the 'good old days' microsoft didn't have a screwed up
marketing message..

-Larry Linson Jr

RobinS wrote:
My guess is that he was talking about doing OLE Automation
from VB. I looked for books on that back when I was doing
VB6, but couldn't really find anything, so I figured it out
via trial&error, and macro-record-then-fix-the-code.

My problem with VSTO is that it's a separate product from
Visual Studio, and I'm not into paying that much money for
two of them, when I can generally come up with the same
result using OLE Automation.

Robin S.
-------------------------------
<aa*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@b28g2000cwb.googleg roups.com...
I'd look for VSTO books.. or are you talking about VBA?

-Aaron

RobinS wrote:
You're welcome. My copy of Tim Patrick's book came in
the mail yesterday; it looks really good. I'm looking
forward to reading it.

BTW, I don't know of any Office automation books; if
you find one, please let us know. I usually do it by
trial & error. Most of my stuff is Excel, although I've
mucked a little with Outlook and Word.

Robin S.
------------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@h48g2000cwc.googleg roups.com...
Thanks Robin (I use 2005 VB.NET), I appriciate the
recomendations,
and
will get them ordered.

Tomas :)
RobinS wrote:

I don't know what version of VB.Net you're using. I really
like Francesco Balena's book on VB:The Language. It only
covers the language, not the forms or data. I have the 2005
version, but he has earlier versions as well. This isn't
really a book for someone who's never done .Net; in each
section, he goes from simple examples to complex info
pretty quickly. I learned a lot from reading this book.

He also has a Standard Practices book that I found a lot
of neat information in.

For data binding, check out Brian Noyes's book.

If you want to know how to write a whole app, check out
Tim Patrick's new book, Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005.
I have it on order, so I can't vouch for it personally,
but there is a good review on amazon, and chapter 1 was
pretty interesting.

Hope that helps.
Robin S.
----------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googleg roups.com...
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie).
Currently I
am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the
starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a
bit
of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and
office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly
appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander


Nov 27 '06 #12

P: n/a
Well, in all fairness, I didn't look for that long. It was
faster for me to figure it out on my own.

Still making assumptions, I see. You're funny.

Robin S.
---------------------
<su******@hotmail.comwrote in message
news:11********************@f16g2000cwb.googlegrou ps.com...
and you're the one that couldn't 'find a book on VBA automation'

if your search skills and your logic skills are flawed; then you MUST
be a crappy ass coder

-Susie, DBA

RobinS wrote:
>Are you calling *me* a crappy-ass coder? Interesting
how you can pass judgment on someone without even
knowing them.

Robin S.
-----------------------------
<la***********@hotmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googleg roups.com...
no wonder you're such a crappy ass coder and you're stuck in VB

I've got 2 book shelves of Office Automation books.. typically books
about Excel 97 or Access 97 for example-- are the best resources--
because back in the 'good old days' microsoft didn't have a screwed up
marketing message..

-Larry Linson Jr

RobinS wrote:
My guess is that he was talking about doing OLE Automation
from VB. I looked for books on that back when I was doing
VB6, but couldn't really find anything, so I figured it out
via trial&error, and macro-record-then-fix-the-code.

My problem with VSTO is that it's a separate product from
Visual Studio, and I'm not into paying that much money for
two of them, when I can generally come up with the same
result using OLE Automation.

Robin S.
-------------------------------
<aa*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@b28g2000cwb.googleg roups.com...
I'd look for VSTO books.. or are you talking about VBA?

-Aaron

RobinS wrote:
You're welcome. My copy of Tim Patrick's book came in
the mail yesterday; it looks really good. I'm looking
forward to reading it.

BTW, I don't know of any Office automation books; if
you find one, please let us know. I usually do it by
trial & error. Most of my stuff is Excel, although I've
mucked a little with Outlook and Word.

Robin S.
------------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@h48g2000cwc.googleg roups.com...
Thanks Robin (I use 2005 VB.NET), I appriciate the
recomendations,
and
will get them ordered.

Tomas :)
RobinS wrote:

I don't know what version of VB.Net you're using. I really
like Francesco Balena's book on VB:The Language. It only
covers the language, not the forms or data. I have the 2005
version, but he has earlier versions as well. This isn't
really a book for someone who's never done .Net; in each
section, he goes from simple examples to complex info
pretty quickly. I learned a lot from reading this book.

He also has a Standard Practices book that I found a lot
of neat information in.

For data binding, check out Brian Noyes's book.

If you want to know how to write a whole app, check out
Tim Patrick's new book, Start-to-Finish Visual Basic 2005.
I have it on order, so I can't vouch for it personally,
but there is a good review on amazon, and chapter 1 was
pretty interesting.

Hope that helps.
Robin S.
----------------------------
"Tomas" <to**************@yahoo.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@f16g2000cwb.googleg roups.com...
Hi,

I have worked with VB.NET for half a year (semi-newbie).
Currently I
am
looking around for some books for those that crossed the
starting
hurdle. There are too many books out there-make choosing, a
bit
of a
gamble.

If you have experience of good VB.NET books on general and
office
automattion, you could recommend, it would be greatly
appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Tomas Nordlander


Nov 27 '06 #13

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