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Location for shared Access database

P: n/a
Hi newsgroup!

Can anyone tell me where I should put a simple Access database file in
order to be accessible for every computer in the network (same
workgroup)? There does not need to be any protection (I heard people say
that I should buy a dedicated server or have special rights for each and
every user, but I can keep it simple since there will be no intruders -
no internet connection available -).
I don't think that the "Programs" folder is the right place.
Should I just place a folder on the primary hard disk, like
"C:\MySharedDatabaseFolder"?

Would that work on Vista, too?

Any help is welcome!!
Thank you for your reply,
Elton.
Nov 10 '06 #1
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13 Replies


P: n/a


"Elton Cohen" <el*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:eD*************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
Hi newsgroup!

Can anyone tell me where I should put a simple Access database file in
order to be accessible for every computer in the network (same workgroup)?
There does not need to be any protection (I heard people say that I should
buy a dedicated server or have special rights for each and every user, but
I can keep it simple since there will be no intruders - no internet
connection available -).
I don't think that the "Programs" folder is the right place.
Should I just place a folder on the primary hard disk, like
"C:\MySharedDatabaseFolder"?

Would that work on Vista, too?

The correct location for a network-shared access database is
c:\$Recycle.Bin.

For a network-shared database, use SQL Server instead:

SQL Server Express Edition (free)
http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/ex...r/default.aspx

SQL Server Migration Assistant for Access (SSMA Access)
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/solutio...s/default.mspx
However, if that's not an option then

C:\MySharedDatabaseFolder

is good. You will also need to add a share on that folder, and grant
network users read write access. This will work on Vista as well, although
you'll need to adjust the local folder permissions since users don't have
write permissions on c:\ by default.
Remember when creating a share, there are two levels of permissions that
both must be set: share-level permissions and folder-level permissions.

If your users aren't in a domain, then you will have to create local
accounts on the shared computer with usernames and passwords matching the
ones used on the users' workstations.

David
Nov 10 '06 #2

P: n/a
I thought SQLServer Express databases were not permitted to be
on shares; I thought they were single-use only. Is that not true?

Robin S.
---------------------------
"David Browne" <davidbaxterbrowne no potted me**@hotmail.comwrote in
message news:ey**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>

"Elton Cohen" <el*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:eD*************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>Hi newsgroup!

Can anyone tell me where I should put a simple Access database file in
order to be accessible for every computer in the network (same
workgroup)? There does not need to be any protection (I heard people say
that I should buy a dedicated server or have special rights for each and
every user, but I can keep it simple since there will be no intruders -
no internet connection available -).
I don't think that the "Programs" folder is the right place.
Should I just place a folder on the primary hard disk, like
"C:\MySharedDatabaseFolder"?

Would that work on Vista, too?


The correct location for a network-shared access database is
c:\$Recycle.Bin.

For a network-shared database, use SQL Server instead:

SQL Server Express Edition (free)
http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/ex...r/default.aspx

SQL Server Migration Assistant for Access (SSMA Access)
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/solutio...s/default.mspx
However, if that's not an option then

C:\MySharedDatabaseFolder

is good. You will also need to add a share on that folder, and grant
network users read write access. This will work on Vista as well,
although you'll need to adjust the local folder permissions since users
don't have write permissions on c:\ by default.
Remember when creating a share, there are two levels of permissions that
both must be set: share-level permissions and folder-level permissions.

If your users aren't in a domain, then you will have to create local
accounts on the shared computer with usernames and passwords matching the
ones used on the users' workstations.

David


Nov 10 '06 #3

P: n/a
Depends on the number of users. For a home network, access is a prefectly
acceptable choice and easy to maintain...much easier than SQL Server.
--
Dennis in Houston
"David Browne" wrote:
>

"Elton Cohen" <el*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:eD*************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
Hi newsgroup!

Can anyone tell me where I should put a simple Access database file in
order to be accessible for every computer in the network (same workgroup)?
There does not need to be any protection (I heard people say that I should
buy a dedicated server or have special rights for each and every user, but
I can keep it simple since there will be no intruders - no internet
connection available -).
I don't think that the "Programs" folder is the right place.
Should I just place a folder on the primary hard disk, like
"C:\MySharedDatabaseFolder"?

Would that work on Vista, too?


The correct location for a network-shared access database is
c:\$Recycle.Bin.

For a network-shared database, use SQL Server instead:

SQL Server Express Edition (free)
http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/ex...r/default.aspx

SQL Server Migration Assistant for Access (SSMA Access)
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/solutio...s/default.mspx
However, if that's not an option then

C:\MySharedDatabaseFolder

is good. You will also need to add a share on that folder, and grant
network users read write access. This will work on Vista as well, although
you'll need to adjust the local folder permissions since users don't have
write permissions on c:\ by default.
Remember when creating a share, there are two levels of permissions that
both must be set: share-level permissions and folder-level permissions.

If your users aren't in a domain, then you will have to create local
accounts on the shared computer with usernames and passwords matching the
ones used on the users' workstations.

David
Nov 10 '06 #4

P: n/a
Hi David,

thanks for your reply.
I really must sleep over that because networking has always been
frustrating for me.
I have kept that chapter in a very dark corner of my project for a long
time.

I think I have somehow underestimated it because I did the following:

1 PC WinXP Pro
1 PC WinXP Home

both PCs have differently namend user accounts, but both are administrators

Plugged both together with an Ethernet cable
Put both in the same workgroup
Shared 1 folder on PC 1
Shared 1 folder on PC 2

PC1 could see and write to folder on PC2
PC2 could see and write to folder on PC1

Somehow I really think I did something magic when I hear that this is
only possible with special permissions or domains or equally named
accounts/ passes.

Giving a short statement about that would be very nice of you.

Thanks.
Elton.
Nov 10 '06 #5

P: n/a


"Elton Cohen" <el*********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:uk**************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
Hi David,

thanks for your reply.
I really must sleep over that because networking has always been
frustrating for me.
I have kept that chapter in a very dark corner of my project for a long
time.

I think I have somehow underestimated it because I did the following:

1 PC WinXP Pro
1 PC WinXP Home

both PCs have differently namend user accounts, but both are
administrators

Plugged both together with an Ethernet cable
Put both in the same workgroup
Shared 1 folder on PC 1
Shared 1 folder on PC 2

PC1 could see and write to folder on PC2
PC2 could see and write to folder on PC1

Somehow I really think I did something magic when I hear that this is only
possible with special permissions or domains or equally named accounts/
passes.

Giving a short statement about that would be very nice of you.
Honestly I don't know why that works for you. May be something with XP. I
know domain or workgroup authentication will work for any version of
Windows.

David

Nov 13 '06 #6

P: n/a


"RobinS" <Ro****@NoSpam.yah.nonewrote in message
news:f-******************************@comcast.com...
>I thought SQLServer Express databases were not permitted to be
on shares; I thought they were single-use only. Is that not true?
Not true. SQL Server Express is well suited to small workgroup environments.
It has not connection limit or workload governer. Rather it is physically
limited to 1CPU, 1GB of RAM and 4GB per database. By default the installer
doesn't enable remote connections to the database, but that's just to be
"secure by default". You can enable remote connections after the install
and you're good to go.

David

Nov 13 '06 #7

P: n/a
Cool. Thanks for clarifying that for me!
Robin S.
-------------------------
"David Browne" <davidbaxterbrowne no potted me**@hotmail.comwrote in
message news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>

"RobinS" <Ro****@NoSpam.yah.nonewrote in message
news:f-******************************@comcast.com...
>>I thought SQLServer Express databases were not permitted to be
on shares; I thought they were single-use only. Is that not true?

Not true. SQL Server Express is well suited to small workgroup
environments. It has not connection limit or workload governer. Rather it
is physically limited to 1CPU, 1GB of RAM and 4GB per database. By
default the installer doesn't enable remote connections to the database,
but that's just to be "secure by default". You can enable remote
connections after the install and you're good to go.

David

Nov 14 '06 #8

P: n/a
On Fri, 10 Nov 2006 21:27:43 +0100, Elton Cohen <el*********@gmail.comwrote:

Hi newsgroup!

Can anyone tell me where I should put a simple Access database file in
order to be accessible for every computer in the network (same
workgroup)? There does not need to be any protection (I heard people say
that I should buy a dedicated server or have special rights for each and
every user, but I can keep it simple since there will be no intruders -
no internet connection available -).
I don't think that the "Programs" folder is the right place.
Should I just place a folder on the primary hard disk, like
"C:\MySharedDatabaseFolder"?

You can place the database file anywhere. In a workgroup environment you just need to create a
network share for the folder location and provide full access to all users.

Users can then create a mapped drive letter to the share or reference the database by the UNC path
(e.g. \\ComputerName\Sharename\db.mdb).
Paul
~~~~
Microsoft MVP (Visual Basic)
Nov 15 '06 #9

P: n/a
On Fri, 10 Nov 2006 15:10:57 -0800, "RobinS" <Ro****@NoSpam.yah.nonewrote:

I thought SQLServer Express databases were not permitted to be
on shares; I thought they were single-use only. Is that not true?


Permitted but not necessarily supported. A SAN is OK but there are certain requirements for NAS. If
you're just using a standard computer file share then all I can say is "good luck".

Description of support for network database files in SQL Server
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/304261
Paul
~~~~
Microsoft MVP (Visual Basic)
Nov 15 '06 #10

P: n/a


"RobinS" <Ro****@NoSpam.yah.nonewrote in message
news:f-******************************@comcast.com...
>I thought SQLServer Express databases were not permitted to be
on shares; I thought they were single-use only. Is that not true?
To clarify, in SQL Server the Database Engine instance is installed on the
same computer as the Database files. Clients connect over the network to
the database engine. Running the database engine on a different computer
from the database files is not supported, and in any case only a single
database engine instance can connect to the database files.

David

Nov 16 '06 #11

P: n/a
Just to make sure I understand. I can run SQLServerExpress
on a computer, and put the database files there.

If I want to access that database from another computer,
I can do that with a desktop app (or web app) using ADO.Net.

But if I install SQLServer Express on the second computer,
I can't access the database files on the first computer
using that instance of SQLServer Express.

But I can have multiple people with desktop apps accessing
the SQLServerExpress database at the same time using ADO.Net?
Or not?

Is that right?

Robin S.
--------------------
"David Browne" <davidbaxterbrowne no potted me**@hotmail.comwrote in
message news:Oz**************@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
>

"RobinS" <Ro****@NoSpam.yah.nonewrote in message
news:f-******************************@comcast.com...
>>I thought SQLServer Express databases were not permitted to be
on shares; I thought they were single-use only. Is that not true?

To clarify, in SQL Server the Database Engine instance is installed on the
same computer as the Database files. Clients connect over the network to
the database engine. Running the database engine on a different computer
from the database files is not supported, and in any case only a single
database engine instance can connect to the database files.

David

Nov 17 '06 #12

P: n/a


"RobinS" <Ro****@NoSpam.yah.nonewrote in message
news:7K******************************@comcast.com. ..
Just to make sure I understand. I can run SQLServerExpress
on a computer, and put the database files there.

If I want to access that database from another computer,
I can do that with a desktop app (or web app) using ADO.Net.

But if I install SQLServer Express on the second computer,
I can't access the database files on the first computer
using that instance of SQLServer Express.

But I can have multiple people with desktop apps accessing
the SQLServerExpress database at the same time using ADO.Net?
Yes. You've got it exactly.

David
Nov 17 '06 #13

P: n/a
Phew! I'm going to keep that information somewhere I can find it
in case I need it in the future!

Thanks,
Robin S.
----------------------------
"David Browne" <davidbaxterbrowne no potted me**@hotmail.comwrote in
message news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
>

"RobinS" <Ro****@NoSpam.yah.nonewrote in message
news:7K******************************@comcast.com. ..
>Just to make sure I understand. I can run SQLServerExpress
on a computer, and put the database files there.

If I want to access that database from another computer,
I can do that with a desktop app (or web app) using ADO.Net.

But if I install SQLServer Express on the second computer,
I can't access the database files on the first computer
using that instance of SQLServer Express.

But I can have multiple people with desktop apps accessing
the SQLServerExpress database at the same time using ADO.Net?

Yes. You've got it exactly.

David


Nov 17 '06 #14

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