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Windows service LocalSystem account

P: n/a
I need to access a network folder with read/write permissions from a windows
service application. I get an error "Access denied..." whenever I try to
access a shared folder on the network.

On 7/24/2006 Michael D. Ober wrote:
Windows services, by default, don't have access to the network. In w2k and
XP there is a network version of the system account you can use.

Does anyone know about this version of the local system account, or any
other way to access network folders on a windows service logged on as a Local
System account?

I much prefer NOT to use a user account since many (or most) of my customers
are not IT professionals. It would be cumbersome to ask them to supply a
user name and password of a user with permissions to log on a service during
the install process.

Thanks for any help.

Walt
--
Walt
Oct 20 '06 #1
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2 Replies


P: n/a
I'm guessing Michael mean the following account:
NT AUTHORITY\NetworkService

While that account has network access, it still might not be able to access
your shared folders (depending on the security settings of the share). I
would still recommend a dedicated account.

/claes

"Walt" <Wa**@discussions.microsoft.comwrote in message
news:E8**********************************@microsof t.com...
>I need to access a network folder with read/write permissions from a
windows
service application. I get an error "Access denied..." whenever I try to
access a shared folder on the network.

On 7/24/2006 Michael D. Ober wrote:
Windows services, by default, don't have access to the network. In w2k
and
XP there is a network version of the system account you can use.

Does anyone know about this version of the local system account, or any
other way to access network folders on a windows service logged on as a
Local
System account?

I much prefer NOT to use a user account since many (or most) of my
customers
are not IT professionals. It would be cumbersome to ask them to supply a
user name and password of a user with permissions to log on a service
during
the install process.

Thanks for any help.

Walt
--
Walt

Oct 23 '06 #2

P: n/a
Hello Claes,

Also, mapped drives are not available if there is no interactive session
logged on, so you'd do well to avoid those. The dedicated account suggestion
is ideal. Just have your installer create the account with the proper permissions.
Then you know the name and password of the account and don't have to ask
anyone for it.

-Boo
I'm guessing Michael mean the following account:
NT AUTHORITY\NetworkService
While that account has network access, it still might not be able to
access your shared folders (depending on the security settings of the
share). I would still recommend a dedicated account.

/claes

"Walt" <Wa**@discussions.microsoft.comwrote in message
news:E8**********************************@microsof t.com...
>I need to access a network folder with read/write permissions from a
windows
service application. I get an error "Access denied..." whenever I
try to
access a shared folder on the network.
On 7/24/2006 Michael D. Ober wrote:
Windows services, by default, don't have access to the network. In
w2k
and
XP there is a network version of the system account you can use.
Does anyone know about this version of the local system account, or
any
other way to access network folders on a windows service logged on as
a
Local
System account?
I much prefer NOT to use a user account since many (or most) of my
customers
are not IT professionals. It would be cumbersome to ask them to
supply a
user name and password of a user with permissions to log on a service
during
the install process.
Thanks for any help.

Walt
--
Walt

Oct 25 '06 #3

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.