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Loading two separate instance of the same assembly

P: n/a
ZaX
Good day folks,

I'm working with a third-party transactionnal SDK, packaged into a few DLL.

In a particular scenario, I need to have two sessions opened on the
infrastructure I access thru the SDK, and I need programmatical control over
the two sessions, so I can make changes in one session depending on the
information I receive from the second session and so on.

However, according to the third-party SDK support staff, a flaw in their
architecture prevents me from running two sessions on a single instance of
their assembly... So they suggested me to run two instances of my program
instead. This works.

But the code need to be extremely performant, so using System.Remoting to
communicate between the two instances of an application would be the least
acceptable option.

So my idea was to try to link to two different instances of the assembly in
some way... Any idea on how I would do that? Should I use system.reflection
to instantiate my types?

Other suggestions, comments?

Thanks!

ZaX
Nov 21 '05 #1
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2 Replies


P: n/a
On 2005-07-01, ZaX <th**********@email.com> wrote:
Good day folks,

I'm working with a third-party transactionnal SDK, packaged into a few DLL.

In a particular scenario, I need to have two sessions opened on the
infrastructure I access thru the SDK, and I need programmatical control over
the two sessions, so I can make changes in one session depending on the
information I receive from the second session and so on.

However, according to the third-party SDK support staff, a flaw in their
architecture prevents me from running two sessions on a single instance of
their assembly... So they suggested me to run two instances of my program
instead. This works.

But the code need to be extremely performant, so using System.Remoting to
communicate between the two instances of an application would be the least
acceptable option.

So my idea was to try to link to two different instances of the assembly in
some way... Any idea on how I would do that? Should I use system.reflection
to instantiate my types?

Other suggestions, comments?

Thanks!

ZaX


ZaX...

If I understand what your saying you want to load the same assembly
twice in the same process. Well, you can do that using appdomains, but
they are just going to use remoting to communicate across appdomain
boundries. So...
--
Tom Shelton [MVP]
Nov 21 '05 #2

P: n/a
ZaX

"Tom Shelton" <ts******@YOUKNOWTHEDRILLcomcast.net> wrote in message
news:OC**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
On 2005-07-01, ZaX <th**********@email.com> wrote:
Good day folks,

I'm working with a third-party transactionnal SDK, packaged into a few DLL.
In a particular scenario, I need to have two sessions opened on the
infrastructure I access thru the SDK, and I need programmatical control over the two sessions, so I can make changes in one session depending on the
information I receive from the second session and so on.

However, according to the third-party SDK support staff, a flaw in their
architecture prevents me from running two sessions on a single instance of their assembly... So they suggested me to run two instances of my program instead. This works.

But the code need to be extremely performant, so using System.Remoting to communicate between the two instances of an application would be the least acceptable option.

So my idea was to try to link to two different instances of the assembly in some way... Any idea on how I would do that? Should I use system.reflection to instantiate my types?

Other suggestions, comments?

Thanks!

ZaX


ZaX...

If I understand what your saying you want to load the same assembly
twice in the same process. Well, you can do that using appdomains, but
they are just going to use remoting to communicate across appdomain
boundries. So...
--
Tom Shelton [MVP]


Tom,

Exactly what I'm trying to do...

Thanks for your idea... Can you please provide me an idea on how to use
AppDomains?

I'll try that and I'll let you know if performance is acceptable.

Thanks a lot!

ZaX
Nov 21 '05 #3

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