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What is your weightage of the 3 characteristics of Object-Oriented Programming....

P: n/a
Hi All,

What is your weightage of the 3 characteristics of Object-Oriented
Programming
i.e. Inheritance, Encapsulation and Polymorphism. for a total of 100%

Please quote your values and let's discuss how the people thinking about OOP

:-)
Regards,
....@shok
------------------------------------------------------------------------
"It is beautiful for an engineer to shape and design the same way
that an artist shapes and designs. But whether the whole process
makes any sense, whether men become happier - that I can no
longer decide." - Rudolph Diesel

Nov 21 '05 #1
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"G.Ashok" <gw******@hotmail.com> a écrit dans le message de news:
Oz**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
What is your weightage of the 3 characteristics of Object-Oriented
Programming
i.e. Inheritance, Encapsulation and Polymorphism. for a total of 100%


What about Aggregation, Composition and Delegation ?

Joanna

--
Joanna Carter
Consultant Software Engineer
Nov 21 '05 #2

P: n/a
I don't know about "relative weightage"... I don't know if that even
means anything.

However, I claim that Encapsulation is usually the principle that has
the most ready application... it's easiest to see immediate and direct
advantages to encapsulation, so it's easy for old procedural
programming hacks like me to see what it's for.

Next comes Inheritance, which doesn't make a whole lot of sense unless
you first understand encapsulation. After writing a lot of stand-alone,
encapsulated classes, it starts to make sense why you'd want
inheritance.

Finally, Polymorphism is the most abstract of the three. Once you have
encapsulation and inheritance, you start to see scenarios in which
polymorphism would be useful.

This says nothing about their relative importance to success of
software projects, or their frequency of use in the industry. It's just
the order in which I recommend that programmers new to O-O tackle them,
becaues the benefits of each tend to be clearer when approached this
way.

Nov 21 '05 #3

P: n/a

Joanna,

Delegation, Containment, are all I think design patterns and not key
characteristics of OOP. These are all used in VB6 like langauages. Rest of
the things are conceptual terms of OOA and OOD etc. of cource all are
applied to OO.

Regards,
....Ashok
"Joanna Carter (TeamB)" <jo*****@nospamforme.com> wrote in message
news:e4*************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
| "G.Ashok" <gw******@hotmail.com> a écrit dans le message de news:
| Oz**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
|
| > What is your weightage of the 3 characteristics of Object-Oriented
| > Programming
| > i.e. Inheritance, Encapsulation and Polymorphism. for a total of 100%
|
| What about Aggregation, Composition and Delegation ?
|
| Joanna
|
| --
| Joanna Carter
| Consultant Software Engineer
|
|
Nov 21 '05 #4

P: n/a
"G.Ashok" <gw******@hotmail.com> schrieb:
Delegation, Containment, are all I think design patterns and not key
characteristics of OOP. These are all used in VB6 like langauages. Rest of
the things are conceptual terms of OOA and OOD etc. of cource all are
applied to OO.


Encapsulation and polymorphism are no typical OO features too, they can be
implemented in simple procedural programming languages up to a certain
extent.

PIE (polymorphism, inheritance, and encapsulation) is a minimal subset of
language features which are required for a programming language language to
be called an object-oriented programming language. Each of the features
alone doesn't necessarily have to do with object-orientation.

--
M S Herfried K. Wagner
M V P <URL:http://dotnet.mvps.org/>
V B <URL:http://classicvb.org/petition/>

Nov 21 '05 #5

P: n/a
JAL
#1 The use of objects.

Nov 21 '05 #6

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#1 the use of reusable and redesignable classes. From which as much objects
as needed can be instanced.

For me is the rest academically, nice when you learn it, however like
driving not important anymore when you drive a car. most things go
automatic.

Cor
Nov 21 '05 #7

P: n/a
OK, he posted this message, over 3PM on a Friday.... So, how many people
here are thinking "take-home exam" ?

Now, the first question that must be asked is, "What is the question?
Which is more important to OOP? or which is more important to good program
design?"

To the latter, Encapsulation (and data hiding) is, by far, the most
important design characteristic. Having your data properly factored in
objects is the primary key to a well-design program. If I had to put a
number of it, it would be about 65-75%. Polymorphic behavior come next,
which I'd put at about 10-20%. These leaves somewhere between 5-25% for
everything else, of which I'd put Inheritance rather low, maybe 0-5%.
Inheritance is an important technique in OOP, but it's just one technique to
implement polymorphism (one of many -- for example, generic programming
accomplishes many of the tasks of OOP without inheritance). We've learned
that deeply rooted class library are often more of a hinderance than a help,
and most modern class libraries tend to be very shallow.

--
Truth,
James Curran
[erstwhile VC++ MVP]

Home: www.noveltheory.com Work: www.njtheater.com
Blog: www.honestillusion.com Day Job: www.partsearch.com

"G.Ashok" <gw******@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Oz**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Hi All,

What is your weightage of the 3 characteristics of Object-Oriented
Programming
i.e. Inheritance, Encapsulation and Polymorphism. for a total of 100%

Please quote your values and let's discuss how the people thinking about OOP
:-)
Regards,
...@shok
------------------------------------------------------------------------
"It is beautiful for an engineer to shape and design the same way
that an artist shapes and designs. But whether the whole process
makes any sense, whether men become happier - that I can no
longer decide." - Rudolph Diesel

Nov 21 '05 #8

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