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Why VB.NET??

P: n/a
Dear all,

I found developing a NOT web related application is too difficult when usng
VB.NET, also the deployment is not easy, is it I am not supposed to use .NET
framework platform??

Please help..

Thank you

Felix
Nov 21 '05 #1
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28 Replies


P: n/a
hi there!!!
i think you dont have much exposure to the vb.net. vb.net is the most
easy language to developed any application amongs the other languages
supported by the .net framework. i'm a vb.net developer so that i can
say the u should learn swimming b4 u just into the sea.

Nov 21 '05 #2

P: n/a
hi there!!!
i think you dont have much exposure to the vb.net. vb.net is the most
easy language to developed any application amongs the other languages
supported by the .net framework. i'm a vb.net developer so that i can
say the u should learn swimming b4 u jump into the sea.

Nov 21 '05 #3

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I agree with the other user. I started using VB from version 3 & VB.NET is
so easy & very powerful indeed. If you want more power then I suggest a
'man's' language and learn C++ though.
Nov 21 '05 #4

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These kind of messages crop up from time to time and they are I think
somewhat philosophical in nature. If you already have a grasp of OOP, then
VB.NET is quite easy to get to grips with. Of course, you still need a
baseline level of knowledge about the APIs in order to be truely productive
with .NET and not start off down the wrong route with your project.

"FelixLeung" <to@felixleung.com> wrote in message
news:Oz*************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Dear all,

I found developing a NOT web related application is too difficult when
usng VB.NET, also the deployment is not easy, is it I am not supposed to
use .NET framework platform??

Please help..

Thank you

Felix

Nov 21 '05 #5

P: n/a
"FelixLeung" <to@felixleung.com> ha scritto nel messaggio
news:Oz*************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...

also the deployment is not easy


but... if it is sufficient a copy of the exe and dll used... :)

There's nothing so easy as the deployment of a .net application.

--
Reporting tool: http://www.neodatatype.net
Nov 21 '05 #6

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>If you want more power then I suggest a 'man's' language and learn C++
though.


Crouchie you make me curious what do you mean with that, could C++ not be
used by woman or do you mean something else?

Cor
Nov 21 '05 #7

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Robin,
Of course, you still need a baseline level of knowledge about the APIs in
order to be truely productive with .NET and not start off down the wrong
route with your project.


You make me as well curious, where is this sentence based on?

Cor
Nov 21 '05 #8

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Felix,

That can be, however probably most developers in this newsgroup have an
other opinion about by instance Office developing. They want more control on
the results. What for me does not mean that office development is wrong, as
well is it not wrong as somebody makes templates for Word and calls that
developing.

However there are than mostly other goals to reach

Just my thought,

Cor
Nov 21 '05 #9

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Cor,

What I meant is that the most powerful language (and the best in my opinion)
to know is C++. It wasn't meant as a sexist statement that I made earlier.
Nov 21 '05 #10

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"Zanna" <zn*******@virgilio.it> wrote in message
news:uJ**********************@news3.tin.it...
"FelixLeung" <to@felixleung.com> ha scritto nel messaggio
news:Oz*************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
also the deployment is not easy


but... if it is sufficient a copy of the exe and dll used... :)

There's nothing so easy as the deployment of a .net application.


.... provided
(a) all of your users already have the .Net Framework installed,
(b) you abandon any sensible concept of code reuse, because
any "shared" assemblies you might have proliferate all over the
place as local copies snared into each and every application, and
(c) you abandon any idea of sharing data between those so-called
"shared" assemblies (passing data created in one DLL to another)
because the Framework see them as totally discrete and
incompatible types.

Share and Enjoy ...

Regards,
Phill W.
Nov 21 '05 #11

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Crouchie,
What I meant is that the most powerful language (and the best in my
opinion)
to know is C++. It wasn't meant as a sexist statement that I made earlier.

I was aware that it was not meant as an sexist statement. :-)

However I would be sure of your answer.

I don't agree with you. The most powerfull language is that language in my
opinion that fits the problem the best. In a lot of cases is C++ than in my
opinion a very very poor program language.

Cor
Nov 21 '05 #12

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"Phill. W" <P.A.Ward@o-p-e-n-.-a-c-.-u-k> ha scritto nel messaggio
news:d2**********@yarrow.open.ac.uk...

... provided
(a) all of your users already have the .Net Framework installed,
That's obvious.
Is a prerequisite, the same with Java, VB, some Borland C++ programs that
requires VCL, PHP, and so on.
If your app works with SQL server you need... SQL server ;)
(b) you abandon any sensible concept of code reuse, because
any "shared" assemblies you might have proliferate all over the
place as local copies snared into each and every application, and
That's not completely true.
You can share your assemblies in the global cache and ALL programs will see
them.
Surely you don't redistribuite the framework assembly you reference in each
application ;)
(c) you abandon any idea of sharing data between those so-called
"shared" assemblies (passing data created in one DLL to another)
because the Framework see them as totally discrete and
incompatible types.


Only if you break the versioning release number.

--
Reporting tool: http://www.neodatatype.net
Nov 21 '05 #13

P: n/a
"lucky" <tu************@gmail.com> schrieb:
i think you dont have much exposure to the vb.net. vb.net is the most
easy language to developed any application amongs the other languages
supported by the .net framework. i'm a vb.net developer so that i can
say the u should learn swimming b4 u just into the sea.


I agree that this applies to the languages which can be used to develop
applications for the .NET Framework. However, in some situations using .NET
is overkill, which means that .NET will introduce an unnecessary complexity.

--
M S Herfried K. Wagner
M V P <URL:http://dotnet.mvps.org/>
V B <URL:http://classicvb.org/petition/>

Nov 21 '05 #14

P: n/a
Robin,

"Robin Tucker" <id*************************@reallyidont.com> schrieb:
These kind of messages crop up from time to time and they are I think
somewhat philosophical in nature. If you already have a grasp of OOP,
then VB.NET is quite easy to get to grips with. Of course, you still need
a baseline level of knowledge about the APIs in order to be truely
productive with .NET and not start off down the wrong route with your
project.


Well, even in-depth knowledge of OOP and the FCL won't make /deployment/
easier :-).

--
M S Herfried K. Wagner
M V P <URL:http://dotnet.mvps.org/>
V B <URL:http://classicvb.org/petition/>

Nov 21 '05 #15

P: n/a
Cor,

For me, C & C++ are the best things since sliced bread. Nothing anyone will
ever say will change my mind of that.

Admittedly, now I have to concentrate on coding in VB.NET which is
incredibly easy to do sinceMicrosoft have done the hard work to make our
(the coders) lives easier.
Nov 21 '05 #16

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Crouchie,

I was writting I like more spagetti than bread. I write it, however there is
no answer needed. In my country they say that is a ball before the open
goal.

Cor
Nov 21 '05 #17

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>> I found developing a NOT web related application is too difficult
when usng
VB.NET, also the deployment is not easy, is it I am not supposed to use .NET framework platform??


As compared to what language?

I'll admit, I much prefer C++, but VB.NET is enough of an improvement
over VB6 that it's actually quite usable. What language do you prefer,
and why?

Nov 21 '05 #18

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Actually, a whole lot of real business applications are written in COBAL! I
wasn't aware of this until I ask my son who is studying computer science why
he programmed in Cobal!

"Linda" wrote:
I found developing a NOT web related application is too difficult when usng VB.NET, also the deployment is not easy, is it I am not supposed to use .NET framework platform??


As compared to what language?

I'll admit, I much prefer C++, but VB.NET is enough of an improvement
over VB6 that it's actually quite usable. What language do you prefer,
and why?

Nov 21 '05 #19

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I had to do COBOL many, many, many years ago. You can learn it in a few
days - lol.
Nov 21 '05 #20

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Dennis,

Cobol Common Business Oriented Language

The reason is that especially big companies are slow in changing, where one
of the reasons are unexpected errors.

An other reason is that Cobol is created for streaming processing. (The
process is to collect data, process that data streaming to a database,
process streaming from the database reports or by instance bills).

What is still a major part of the processes by big companies. Think for that
on Banks, Gas, Electra, Social etc companies.

Cobol fits very well for those processes (a major difference with newer
languages is that it is not event driven). So there is not much reason for
the management to change (a problem can be when a kind of hardware that was
forever used is not anymore deliverable, than we probably see actions driven
by panic.

I hope that this gives an idea

Cor
Nov 21 '05 #21

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Well, back then Basic was not event driven also. I guess there are some
events in Cobol now :-)

Best Regards,
Alejandro Lapeyre

"Cor Ligthert" <no************@planet.nl> escribió en el mensaje
news:OI**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Dennis,

Cobol Common Business Oriented Language

The reason is that especially big companies are slow in changing, where
one of the reasons are unexpected errors.

An other reason is that Cobol is created for streaming processing. (The
process is to collect data, process that data streaming to a database,
process streaming from the database reports or by instance bills).

What is still a major part of the processes by big companies. Think for
that on Banks, Gas, Electra, Social etc companies.

Cobol fits very well for those processes (a major difference with newer
languages is that it is not event driven). So there is not much reason for
the management to change (a problem can be when a kind of hardware that
was forever used is not anymore deliverable, than we probably see actions
driven by panic.

I hope that this gives an idea

Cor

Nov 21 '05 #22

P: n/a
Alejandro,
Well, back then Basic was not event driven also. I guess there are some
events in Cobol now :-)


I had first in my message (the original) however skipped that.

Because I think (don't know) that those newer ones are not which are used
for the processes I am talking about.

:-)

Cor
Nov 21 '05 #23

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I had first in my message (the original) however skipped that.

I had that
first............................................. .............................
Nov 21 '05 #24

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I couldnt resist to write COBOL. :-)
Best Regards,
Alejandro Lapeyre

"Cor Ligthert" <no************@planet.nl> escribió en el mensaje
news:et****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Alejandro,
Well, back then Basic was not event driven also. I guess there are some
events in Cobol now :-)


I had first in my message (the original) however skipped that.

Because I think (don't know) that those newer ones are not which are used
for the processes I am talking about.

:-)

Cor

Nov 21 '05 #25

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"Zanna" <zn*******@virgilio.it> wrote in message
news:xn**********************@news3.tin.it...
"Phill. W" <P.A.Ward@o-p-e-n-.-a-c-.-u-k> ha scritto nel messaggio
news:d2**********@yarrow.open.ac.uk...
... provided
(a) all of your users already have the .Net Framework installed,
That's obvious. Is a prerequisite ...


True enough, but this particular "prerequisite" runs to 20-odd Mb;
the VB6 equivalent was what? 4 Mb? Not /everyone/ has a T1
connection to Our Friends in Redmonds' down load site ;-)
(b) you abandon any sensible concept of code reuse, because
any "shared" assemblies you might have proliferate all over the
place as local copies snared into each and every application, and
That's not completely true.
You can share your assemblies in the global cache and ALL programs
will see them.


Again true, but the O.P. was, IIRC, referring to XCopy deployment,
just lift, drop and run, which precludes use of the GAC.
Surely you don't redistribuite the framework assembly you reference
in each application ;)


Of //course// I do 8-))
(c) you abandon any idea of sharing data between those so-called
"shared" assemblies (passing data created in one DLL to another)
because the Framework see them as totally discrete and
incompatible types.


Only if you break the versioning release number.


For a GAC-"registered" assembly, I'd agree but, to date, I've never
managed to pass data between "local" DLL's in different applications.

Regards,
Phill W.
Nov 21 '05 #26

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You seem to imply that the more complicated a language is the more of a "man"
you are. FYI, all programming languages are "SIMPLE" including machine
language...it's the applicaiton design and especially the user interface that
really distinguishes the System's analysts from the programmers.

"Crouchie1998" wrote:
I had to do COBOL many, many, many years ago. You can learn it in a few
days - lol.

Nov 21 '05 #27

P: n/a
Again true, but the O.P. was, IIRC, referring to XCopy deployment,
just lift, drop and run, which precludes use of the GAC.


And also precludes *dll hell* which is kinda the whole point. Its horses
for courses and with .Net, you the developer get to decide.

Richard
Nov 21 '05 #28

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more difficult than.... what?

I'm no lover of Microsoft in general ... but you have to give props to
the homies when they knock one out of the park.

I am developing vertical applications for my employer, a large
scientific insturment company, and blowing them away with how fast I
have been able to produce meaningful results, even though I have never
professionally developed desktop apps in my life.

if you are finding VB.NET too difficult, the problem is probably that
(a) you haven't cracked a good book on the subject [because] (b) you
are not a programmer.

If you are a designer, you might consider flash -- it has simple tools
for developing simple forms and can be made into an executable.

Nov 21 '05 #29

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