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Distributing EXE via Academic VS.NET?

Is there a restriction with the academic version of VS.NET 2003 in the way
of distributing an EXE? Or, what is the difference in this version and the
commercial versions with respect to distribution? Is there some mechanism
in place that prevents distribution?

Thanks,
Brett
Nov 21 '05 #1
6 1263
'Maybe' the answer you are looking for is on the following page:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/pr...emic/overview/
Nov 21 '05 #2

"Crouchie1998" <Cr**********@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:23**********************************@microsof t.com...
'Maybe' the answer you are looking for is on the following page:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/pr...emic/overview/


There isn't anything there that discuss it but this sentence is interesting,
"It combines all of the features of Visual Studio .NET 2003 Professional
with new tools and features". Pro is fully able to distribute its EXEs. If
Academic has inherited this capability, it should also. If it will, who
knows?
Nov 21 '05 #3
You can copy the Application exe and all the assoicated DLL's that are in
your project's bin directory that were created and compiled under the
Academic version to any computer which has the .net framework (assuming it's
at least the version or higher that you compiled your project under) and it
will run ok. However, the license restrictions for the Academic version say
you aren't licensed to distribute applications created by the Academic
version I think.

"Brett" wrote:
Is there a restriction with the academic version of VS.NET 2003 in the way
of distributing an EXE? Or, what is the difference in this version and the
commercial versions with respect to distribution? Is there some mechanism
in place that prevents distribution?

Thanks,
Brett

Nov 21 '05 #4
There is no M$ tech support on the academic ver.
You should be able to make exe from the VS.net academic ver, but you should
not develop commercial s/w with academic ver. I think it is in the EUL.

Egghead

"Brett" <no@spam.net> wrote in message
news:OT**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Is there a restriction with the academic version of VS.NET 2003 in the way
of distributing an EXE? Or, what is the difference in this version and the commercial versions with respect to distribution? Is there some mechanism
in place that prevents distribution?

Thanks,
Brett

Nov 21 '05 #5
> There is no M$ tech support
What's an M$? Some kind of old-fashioned string variable??/

Bob Lehmann

"Egghead" <ro******@shaw.ca> wrote in message
news:9xn%d.741752$Xk.482653@pd7tw3no...
There is no M$ tech support on the academic ver.
You should be able to make exe from the VS.net academic ver, but you should not develop commercial s/w with academic ver. I think it is in the EUL.

Egghead

"Brett" <no@spam.net> wrote in message
news:OT**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Is there a restriction with the academic version of VS.NET 2003 in the way of distributing an EXE? Or, what is the difference in this version and

the
commercial versions with respect to distribution? Is there some mechanism in place that prevents distribution?

Thanks,
Brett


Nov 21 '05 #6

"Brett" <no@spam.net> wrote in message
news:e5***************@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...

"Crouchie1998" <Cr**********@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:23**********************************@microsof t.com...
'Maybe' the answer you are looking for is on the following page:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/pr...emic/overview/


There isn't anything there that discuss it but this sentence is
interesting, "It combines all of the features of Visual Studio .NET 2003
Professional with new tools and features". Pro is fully able to
distribute its EXEs. If Academic has inherited this capability, it should
also. If it will, who knows?

To answer your question:
Visual Studio .NET 2003 Academic Edition and Visual Studio .NET 2003
Professional Edition are identical with two exceptions:
1) Visual Studio .NET 2003 Academic Edition does *not* support remote
debugging, and
2) Visual Studio .NET 2003 Academic Edition comes with an extra Academic
Tools CD which does not come with the Professional Edition.
That means that you can add a Deployment Project to your solution to set it
up for distribution in Academic just as you can in Professional.
The licensing terms associated with the Academic Edition are a bit cloudy.
AFAIK, *if* you purchased the "retail box" Academic Edition, there is no
restriction on distribution of your work, but if you acquired the Academic
Edition through an academic institution or from some other source, you are
restricted from distributing your work on a commercial basis (i.e. for
profit).
I'd suggest two additional sources of information on the licensing:
1. On your distribution CD's, you should be able to find a file named
"eula.txt", which is the governing document for your license.
2. If you have questions on the EULA, call Microsoft and get an
authoritative interpretation.
Disclaimer: I am neither a Microsoft representative nor an attorney.

--
Peter [MVP Visual Developer]
Jack of all trades, master of none.
Nov 21 '05 #7

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