469,326 Members | 1,359 Online
Bytes | Developer Community
New Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Post your question to a community of 469,326 developers. It's quick & easy.

Stand Alone EXE

I was wondering if it is at all posible to write a stand alone .EXE program
in Visual Studio .NET. Hopefully in VB.NET but if not another language would
be ok. Thanks for the assistance
Nov 21 '05
151 4957
Jim Hubbard wrote:
The only problem with Linux is the GPL. I completely agree with an open API structure, but the open source thing has simply resulted in hundreds of Linux distros that are just different enough to make programming more complex.


I'm a programmer. The different Linux distros do NOT make programming
more complex. The basic APIs are identical for all Linux distros.

The GPL is what makes this possible. If it weren't for the GPL,
companies could produce distros that were "just different enough to
make programming more complex". This happened in fact with Unix in the
1980s. There was Digital Unix, Silicon Graphics Unix etc and they were
"just different enough" and were proprietary.

So contrary to what you believe, GPL is the solution. Not a problem.

Retlak

Nov 21 '05 #151

<re****@go.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@f14g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...
Jim Hubbard wrote:
The only problem with Linux is the GPL. I completely agree with an

open API
structure, but the open source thing has simply resulted in hundreds

of
Linux distros that are just different enough to make programming more

complex.


I'm a programmer. The different Linux distros do NOT make programming
more complex. The basic APIs are identical for all Linux distros.

The GPL is what makes this possible. If it weren't for the GPL,
companies could produce distros that were "just different enough to
make programming more complex". This happened in fact with Unix in the
1980s. There was Digital Unix, Silicon Graphics Unix etc and they were
"just different enough" and were proprietary.

So contrary to what you believe, GPL is the solution. Not a problem.

Retlak


I disagree. While programming in a very basic way is most certainly
possible on multiple Linux distros, you must use only the most basic
functionalities of the kernel. This does not allow you to port your
applications if you take advantage of any of the additional APIs added by
the hundreds of distros.

Why would you take advantage of APIs not in most distros? To make
programming easier. To no re-invent the wheel.

I am no Linux programmer. However, I am a programmer and a business owner.
As such, I think I can speak to a fundamental short-coming in the Linux
community.

If you, or the Linux Community in general, want to see Linux overtake
Windows on the desktop, there is a simple solution. (Simple solutions do
seem to evade the Linux community.)

Make a Visual Basic-like programming IDE for Linux. The thing that makes
Windows so popular and an absolute necessity is the vast number of
applications available for it. Linux does have an impressive number of
applications - but they are usually free - that means that no business is
supporting them - that means that business can't use those Linux
applications.

Until you take over the business desktop, you will not take the home
desktops.

One of the biggest boons to Windows ever was the development of Visual
Basic. It was (in Microsoft's own words) for "task oriented developers".
What's that mean?

It simply means that Visual Basic was a simplified programming tool for
non-professional programmers. Accountants could write a small,
business-specific accounting application. If things went well, this
application usually launched a business to support it.

This happened millions of times, with millions of non-professional "task
oriented" developers. This is what made, and continues to make, Windows the
most used desktop in the world by an overwhelming margin.

Do people want to be tied to Windows? Nope. Too expensive. Too many
forced changes.

So, I beg you. If you want to help Linux succeed, speak with other Linux
developers that you know and give us a Visual Basic-like programming IDE for
Linux.

Linux needs to be totally visually oriented (i.e. a user should never have
to see a command line - FOR ANY REASON). This gives the (frankly speaking)
dumbed down environment that makes Windows so popular.

And the second thing it needs is a Visual Basic-like language and IDE so
that the people that work at the companies that run Windows can start moving
their companies to Linux from within - WITHOUT having to become a
professional Linux programmer.

Do these 2 things, and you'll be able to watch Microsoft's lead melt away
like butter on hot pavement.

Jim Hubbard
Nov 21 '05 #152

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.

Similar topics

9 posts views Thread by none | last post: by
121 posts views Thread by David Pendrey | last post: by
3 posts views Thread by Todd D. Levy | last post: by
7 posts views Thread by Ulrich Wisser | last post: by
2 posts views Thread by skneife | last post: by
1 post views Thread by CARIGAR | last post: by
reply views Thread by zhoujie | last post: by
reply views Thread by harlem98 | last post: by
By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.