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VB.net public domain - 5 Questions

P: n/a
1. Planet-Source-Code has a 'compatibility filter' that asks for a
e-mail/password, which then transfers the user to another site,
rent-a-coder. This seems deceptive to me. At any rate, there is no filter
element for VB.Net. Any comments on this site?

2. I have a partial solution that I want to publish. I want the public
domain to help with it, but I want to retain control, copyright, and initial
code. How do I go about doing that?

3. I would like to beef up my reusable code database. Are there any large,
common "monitored" VB.net public domain stores (storage) on the net for free
code and apps, either http or ftp?

4. Is there a standard way to wrap this type of software, that is, VS.net
solutions, files, directories, and relative paths, so they work when
downloaded and installed?

5. Is there a standard installation program for this type of software?

Dennis D.
--
http://www.dennisys.com/
Nov 21 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
Hi,

Maybe you could create a workspace at the gotdotnet website.

http://www.gotdotnet.com/workspaces/

Ken
--------------------
"Dennis D." <te**@dennisys.com> wrote in message
news:Om**************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
1. Planet-Source-Code has a 'compatibility filter' that asks for a
e-mail/password, which then transfers the user to another site,
rent-a-coder. This seems deceptive to me. At any rate, there is no filter
element for VB.Net. Any comments on this site?

2. I have a partial solution that I want to publish. I want the public
domain to help with it, but I want to retain control, copyright, and initial
code. How do I go about doing that?

3. I would like to beef up my reusable code database. Are there any large,
common "monitored" VB.net public domain stores (storage) on the net for free
code and apps, either http or ftp?

4. Is there a standard way to wrap this type of software, that is, VS.net
solutions, files, directories, and relative paths, so they work when
downloaded and installed?

5. Is there a standard installation program for this type of software?

Dennis D.
--
http://www.dennisys.com/

Nov 21 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hello Dennis:
1. Planet-Source-Code has a 'compatibility filter' that asks for a
e-mail/password, which then transfers the user to another site,
rent-a-coder. This seems deceptive to me. At any rate, there is no filter
element for VB.Net. Any comments on this site?

never used planet source code for anything at all. I looked as a result of
this message. You are correct: they don't appear to accept VB submissions
for .NET. Kinda weird. I didn't end up at rentacoder though.
2. I have a partial solution that I want to publish. I want the public
domain to help with it, but I want to retain control, copyright, and initial code. How do I go about doing that?


Don't know about retaining control. Copyright goes to all authors. If an
author helps you, you need to get him or her to sign off a contract before
joining the project. Some will, many won't. No one wants their hard work
turned into someone else's profit.

On the other hand, you can put restrictions on the use for the software into
its distribution. You can say that no commercial systems may be derived
from the open source code unless specific permission is granted by you.

Why not take a look at the contracts that come with other large open source
projects? Even better yet, hire an attorney.

The real economic benefit for Open Source comes when a large and complex
system needs to be installed. Some companies will hire consultants who know
the system in order to install it. They'll also pay for customer support.
That's where you make the money. Don't make it on the software: make it on
the service and support. (the Red Hat business model).

--
--- Nick Malik [Microsoft]
MCSD, CFPS, Certified Scrummaster
http://blogs.msdn.com/nickmalik

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in this forum are my own, and not
representative of my employer.
I do not answer questions on behalf of my employer. I'm just a
programmer helping programmers.
--
Nov 21 '05 #3

P: n/a
Thank you Ken Tucker:
I'm in the process of setting up the workspace now. Looks like this will
fill the bill for the time being.
Seems to be the right solution at the right time for the project.

Thanks again,

Dennis D.,
http://www.dennisys.com/

"Ken Tucker [MVP]" <vb***@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
news:en**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
Hi,

Maybe you could create a workspace at the gotdotnet website.

http://www.gotdotnet.com/workspaces/

Ken
--------------------
"Dennis D." <te**@dennisys.com> wrote in message
news:Om**************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
1. Planet-Source-Code has a 'compatibility filter' that asks for a
e-mail/password, which then transfers the user to another site,
rent-a-coder. This seems deceptive to me. At any rate, there is no filter
element for VB.Net. Any comments on this site?

2. I have a partial solution that I want to publish. I want the public
domain to help with it, but I want to retain control, copyright, and
initial
code. How do I go about doing that?

3. I would like to beef up my reusable code database. Are there any large,
common "monitored" VB.net public domain stores (storage) on the net for
free
code and apps, either http or ftp?

4. Is there a standard way to wrap this type of software, that is, VS.net
solutions, files, directories, and relative paths, so they work when
downloaded and installed?

5. Is there a standard installation program for this type of software?

Dennis D.
--
http://www.dennisys.com/

Nov 21 '05 #4

P: n/a
Thank you Nick Malik:

"Nick Malik [Microsoft]" <ni*******@hotmail.nospam.com>
wrote in message news:eMDzd.636807$D%.280590@attbi_s51...
No one wants their hard work turned into someone else's profit.
.... a reflection of the world as it is today, unfortunately.
On the other hand, you can put restrictions on the use for the
software into its distribution...
I like the workspaces idea of GotDotNet. Seems there is a server
support problem, as in a lack of it. Otherwise this would seem to
be a great idea.

So I have this application that you couldn't even call beta, and I
would like help with it. How many people bought some version
of the dot net language, in my case VB.Net, and are asking this
same question? I would expect the number to be in the thousands.
Any recommendations?
--
--- Nick Malik [Microsoft]
MCSD, CFPS, Certified Scrummaster
http://blogs.msdn.com/nickmalik

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in this forum are my own, and not
representative of my employer.
I do not answer questions on behalf of my employer. I'm just a
programmer helping programmers.
--

Dennis D.
http://www.dennisys.com/
Nov 21 '05 #5

P: n/a
Hello Dennis,
On the other hand, you can put restrictions on the use for the
software into its distribution...
I like the workspaces idea of GotDotNet. Seems there is a server
support problem, as in a lack of it. Otherwise this would seem to
be a great idea.


Sourceforge appears to be better supported. There are a number of .net apps
there. Unfortunately, it is tougher to get set up there. I joined two
Sourceforge projects and dropped out of both after a while. The server
speed wasn't the issue... the lack of community was. It's a tradeoff.

So I have this application that you couldn't even call beta, and I
would like help with it. How many people bought some version
of the dot net language, in my case VB.Net, and are asking this
same question? I would expect the number to be in the thousands.
Any recommendations?


Nothing wrong with going open source... I was just suggesting that you don't
get anywhere if you assume that you will control it when you are done. You
might. An attorney can help. But open source is largely uncontrollable in
many ways.

That said, if you want help, I'd recommend that you go open source. If the
app is cool, and you want to sell it, retain the right to put out a
commercial version, and keep that right to yourself and the other authors.
(you REALLY need an attorney, now, if you want to go this way in the
future). Your open source version will simply compete with you. (see SSH
for an example of this in real life).

On the other hand, don't sell it. Sell support for it. Sell consulting.
Sell books. You can always do that.

--- Nick Malik [Microsoft]
MCSD, CFPS, Certified Scrummaster
http://blogs.msdn.com/nickmalik

Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in this forum are my own, and not
representative of my employer.
I do not answer questions on behalf of my employer. I'm just a
programmer helping programmers.
--
Nov 21 '05 #6

P: n/a
Thanks for the wisdom Nick Malik concerning open source projects.
--- Nick Malik [Microsoft]
MCSD, CFPS, Certified Scrummaster
http://blogs.msdn.com/nickmalik


Dennis D.,
http://www.dennisys.com/
Nov 21 '05 #7

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