By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
443,515 Members | 1,033 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 443,515 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Architecture for .NET application

P: n/a
(.NET rookie alert)

I am in the planning/design stage of converting a VB 6 application to
a .NET web-based application so that our clients can simply use their
browser (IE 6). Current architecture is fairly basic: the VB forms
contain the presentation logic, the business logic is in classes, and
we have a data connection DLL. After some rudimentary research
through documentation and newsgroups, my initial thought is to design
the new app as follows (using Visual Studio.NET):

1) Use VB.NET to create the business logic (via classes); compile as
DLLs which will reside on the server. NOTE: Data connection via
ADO.NET will be handled in its own "virtual layer".

2) Use ASP.NET to create the presentation layer. I do not expect to
have any business logic or data connection logic within this layer.
Everything will be handled via Server objects (#1)

Thoughts? Am I way off base here?

Thanks
Nov 21 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
4 Replies


P: n/a
Jeff,

AspNet is stateless.

That means that it is not as easy to use classes and shared classes as with
window forms.

Instanced object will be go out of scope as soon as the page is sand again
to the user. (Think that only one method from a button is done and than
again goes everything out of scope).

Shared classes belong to all users that are loged in, so that means that you
should make a lot of code to seperate all users that use a sharedclass
yourself.

Not positive maybe however I hope it gives some ideas

Cor

Nov 21 '05 #2

P: n/a
Thanks for the response.

I hate to ask such a generic question, but I'll do it anyway: So what is
the "best" approach/architecture? The client insists on a browser as the
interface.

"Cor Ligthert" wrote:
Jeff,

AspNet is stateless.

That means that it is not as easy to use classes and shared classes as with
window forms.

Instanced object will be go out of scope as soon as the page is sand again
to the user. (Think that only one method from a button is done and than
again goes everything out of scope).

Shared classes belong to all users that are loged in, so that means that you
should make a lot of code to seperate all users that use a sharedclass
yourself.

Not positive maybe however I hope it gives some ideas

Cor

Nov 21 '05 #3

P: n/a
I hate the word "Best" because it always depends on so many factors.

Do you mind if I point you on this, it is full of examples even complete
applications.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/asp.net/asprk/

I hope this helps a little bit?

Cor
Nov 21 '05 #4

P: n/a
> Jeffwrote:
(.NET rookie alert)

I am in the planning/design stage of converting a VB 6 application to a .NET web-based application so that our clients can simply use their browser (IE 6). Current architecture is fairly basic: the VB forms contain the presentation logic, the business logic is in classes, and we have a data connection DLL. After some rudimentary research
through documentation and newsgroups, my initial thought is to design the new app as follows (using Visual Studio.NET):

1) Use VB.NET to create the business logic (via classes); compile as DLLs which will reside on the server. NOTE: Data connection via
ADO.NET will be handled in its own "virtual layer".

2) Use ASP.NET to create the presentation layer. I do not expect to have any business logic or data connection logic within this layer. Everything will be handled via Server objects (#1)

Thoughts? Am I way off base here?

Thanks


This is how we are doing it at work. We have a DLL that handles the
database and emails. The connection string and smtp server is in the
web.config file. We have a DLL for each sub-section of our web app.
Each sub-section has a reference of the database/email DLL. We then
bring all those sub apps into one DLL and tie that DLL to a security
level DLL. Then we tied that DLL our presentation layer.

What is interesting is that a lot of books and examples on the net
don't seem to go into n-tier application development enough in .Net.
Most examples I seen show business logic in the ASPX page. We are
VB.Net at work, but I am trying to do the same in C# at home.
Although C# looks better, VB.Net has a lot of short cuts I find time
saving in terms of coding.

Nov 21 '05 #5

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.