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looking for good book on theory

P: n/a
Bob
I know this is a tall order, but I'm looking for a book that talks about the
implications of alternative approaches to languages than we typically see, such
as allowing multiple inheritance... detailed, but not so heavy that the
interesting, qualitative conclusions are left to the reader to dig out of a set
of equations. Any recommendations?

Bob

Nov 20 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
I think it would be helpful to know if you were looking for a book that
focused on a particular type of theory...

i.e.

Application Design
Operating System Design (ooohhhh)
Game programming design theory
business software design theory
data driven design
etc..
etc.
etc.

For some reason this computer science thing just has all these sections
(unbenounced to most end users, that think if we know one language or how to
write one thing, we know em all... does a plastic surgeon know how to
perform a quadruple bypass? I think not...

=)
"Bob" <no*****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:eC**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
I know this is a tall order, but I'm looking for a book that talks about the implications of alternative approaches to languages than we typically see, such as allowing multiple inheritance... detailed, but not so heavy that the
interesting, qualitative conclusions are left to the reader to dig out of a set of equations. Any recommendations?

Bob

Nov 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
Bob
If I wanted to learn about alternative computer language concepts such as
multiple inheritance (which languages use it? is it useful? what problems can it
create?), or perhaps aspect-oriented programming (do any mainstream languages
use it yet? how does it alter OO? where can it give the most benefit?), it would
be absurd to say "okay, this form of inheritance only applies to game
programming", or "this way of compiling code can only be used for application
design".

For some reason this computer science thing has just all this theory that is
abstracted away from application. Unbeknownst to most end users, that think just
because they code, they know what computer science is... does a VB.Net
programmer necessarily know anything about compilers? I think not...

=)

Bob

"CJ Taylor" <no****@blowgoats.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...
I think it would be helpful to know if you were looking for a book that
focused on a particular type of theory...

i.e.

Application Design
Operating System Design (ooohhhh)
Game programming design theory
business software design theory
data driven design
etc..
etc.
etc.

For some reason this computer science thing just has all these sections
(unbenounced to most end users, that think if we know one language or how to
write one thing, we know em all... does a plastic surgeon know how to
perform a quadruple bypass? I think not...

=)


Nov 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
The same could be said about a compiler writer... do they actualy know
anything about application design? no. =)

Tall order like you said. Not because what your asking is absurd in any
way, but most people forgot what computer science was. =)

Honestly, if you really want to learn some cool theories, read some old CS
books from the 70's and early 80's, when software design didn't represent
the mindset of a lusty teenage boy...

Given... I'm only 23, but I still am one of those people that likes to know
why and not just how... A lot of "CS" people forget that now adays... =)

I used to have a book from my college days called Principles of Software
Engineering 3rd edition, it was pretty good, but I have no clue who wrote it
(a first...) but go on amazon and search books for software
engineering/software design and you should find some intersting things

The reason I comment on using older books even is because a lot of times you
can read about just the idea of what OO came from... The foundations of
event driven programming. It's kinda fun. Oh that and you can giggle at
the old Pascal Psuedo-code. =)

I hope it helps... maybe someone can give you something more modern, but I
alwways thought that the non-language specific stuff gave you a broader
background on the concept rather than the implementation.

-CJ

"Bob" <no*****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:ue**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
If I wanted to learn about alternative computer language concepts such as
multiple inheritance (which languages use it? is it useful? what problems can it create?), or perhaps aspect-oriented programming (do any mainstream languages use it yet? how does it alter OO? where can it give the most benefit?), it would be absurd to say "okay, this form of inheritance only applies to game
programming", or "this way of compiling code can only be used for application design".

For some reason this computer science thing has just all this theory that is abstracted away from application. Unbeknownst to most end users, that think just because they code, they know what computer science is... does a VB.Net
programmer necessarily know anything about compilers? I think not...

=)

Bob

"CJ Taylor" <no****@blowgoats.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...
I think it would be helpful to know if you were looking for a book that
focused on a particular type of theory...

i.e.

Application Design
Operating System Design (ooohhhh)
Game programming design theory
business software design theory
data driven design
etc..
etc.
etc.

For some reason this computer science thing just has all these sections
(unbenounced to most end users, that think if we know one language or how to write one thing, we know em all... does a plastic surgeon know how to
perform a quadruple bypass? I think not...

=)

Nov 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
Bob,
If I wanted to learn about alternative computer language concepts such as
multiple inheritance (which languages use it? is it useful? what problems can it create?) Mutliple inheritance is a concept that is used in both C++ & Eiffel, and
"good" books on C++ & Eiffel should cover if its useful or not. Note
Eiffel.NET supports multiple inheritance within Eiffel.NET code.
create?), or perhaps aspect-oriented programming (do any mainstream languages use it yet? how does it alter OO? where can it give the most benefit?), The only real articles I've seen on aspect-oriented programming have been on
MSDN. I believe its new enough that there may not be a lot out there, of
course I have not really looked ;-)

Items that you may want to add to your list include, but are not limited to:
- Refactoring - (http://www.refactoring.com)
- Extreme Programming (XP)
- nunit & csunit (unit testing). (www.nunit.org, www.csunit.org)
- Design by Contract (http://www.eiffel.com)
- Design Patterns

Hope this helps
Jay

"Bob" <no*****@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:ue**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl... If I wanted to learn about alternative computer language concepts such as
multiple inheritance (which languages use it? is it useful? what problems can it create?), or perhaps aspect-oriented programming (do any mainstream languages use it yet? how does it alter OO? where can it give the most benefit?), it would be absurd to say "okay, this form of inheritance only applies to game
programming", or "this way of compiling code can only be used for application design".

For some reason this computer science thing has just all this theory that is abstracted away from application. Unbeknownst to most end users, that think just because they code, they know what computer science is... does a VB.Net
programmer necessarily know anything about compilers? I think not...

=)

Bob

"CJ Taylor" <no****@blowgoats.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...
I think it would be helpful to know if you were looking for a book that
focused on a particular type of theory...

i.e.

Application Design
Operating System Design (ooohhhh)
Game programming design theory
business software design theory
data driven design
etc..
etc.
etc.

For some reason this computer science thing just has all these sections
(unbenounced to most end users, that think if we know one language or how to write one thing, we know em all... does a plastic surgeon know how to
perform a quadruple bypass? I think not...

=)

Nov 20 '05 #5

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