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Longhorn + XAML & VB.Net

P: n/a
Hi guys,

Recently i read some articles on Longhorn & XAML.
& From what i learnt the future for developing UIs lies in XAML.
Does this mean that I've got to learn XAML as developing UIs for web or win
applications will be different?
Or will future versions of VS.Net wrap up the XAML hence making it
unnecessary for me to know or learn XAML?

--
Besty Regards,
Thilaka
Nov 20 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
If you already are using VB.NET, you will still be able to create windows
applications without XAML.
XAML just provides a way to create a UI using XML (and an associated .NET
code-behind type file, .vb, .cs, etc). IMHO, this, coupled with newer .NET
deployment models will eventually wipe out HTML applications. HTML will
still be a popular mechanism for doing what it was originally designed for -
content/layout. But the ease of creating and deploying rich apps that don't
have the limitations of browsers and script will catch on quick. For
example, I know a lot of IT technicians and admins that write simple utility
scripts - they will now be able to create a complete tool UI in XML using
XAML. But think of XAML only as a way to provide a UI definition using XML.
That's about all it is. This won't substitute creating EXEs in as much as
you will still be able to create these without XAML. Eventually, there will
be designers that will allow you to "paint" the UI, and it will complete the
XML portion for you. At any rate, XAML is still a ways off, and from what I
can tell, isn't feature-complete yet, so you still have plenty of time to
learn it if you want to.

What's particularly interesting is the non-MS world's (primarily the Linux
crowd) take on XAML. From the blogs and reviews that I've seen, they are
taking this as a serious threat to web (in their opinion web = HTML)
applications. The threat for them is that MS is creating a superior model
that is extremely easy to use, and (the dangerous part) completely bypasses
the W3C standards board (or any standards board for that matter). The fear
is that people will find the flexibility and ease of use so compelling that
they won't care that XAML only runs on Windows - just like most of the HTML
today is written for IE, and not as generic HTML that any browser can use,
but worse. There are already a few projects (and the MONO guys are in on
this too) to create XAML for non-Windows platforms. In my opinion, this will
only help accelerate the adoption of XAML, and quicken the demise of HTML
for web apps (which may not be exactly what they had in mind?) Therefore,
ignoring XAML completely will probably not be a good idea in the long run.

-Rob Teixeira [MVP]

"Thilaka" <th*****@mymail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Hi guys,

Recently i read some articles on Longhorn & XAML.
& From what i learnt the future for developing UIs lies in XAML.
Does this mean that I've got to learn XAML as developing UIs for web or win applications will be different?
Or will future versions of VS.Net wrap up the XAML hence making it
unnecessary for me to know or learn XAML?

--
Besty Regards,
Thilaka

Nov 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
Rob,
Thanx a lot for the very concise reply. (all doubts cleared).
Best Regards,
Thilaka

"Rob Teixeira [MVP]" <RobTeixeira@@msn.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
If you already are using VB.NET, you will still be able to create windows
applications without XAML.
XAML just provides a way to create a UI using XML (and an associated .NET
code-behind type file, .vb, .cs, etc). IMHO, this, coupled with newer .NET
deployment models will eventually wipe out HTML applications. HTML will
still be a popular mechanism for doing what it was originally designed for - content/layout. But the ease of creating and deploying rich apps that don't have the limitations of browsers and script will catch on quick. For
example, I know a lot of IT technicians and admins that write simple utility scripts - they will now be able to create a complete tool UI in XML using
XAML. But think of XAML only as a way to provide a UI definition using XML. That's about all it is. This won't substitute creating EXEs in as much as
you will still be able to create these without XAML. Eventually, there will be designers that will allow you to "paint" the UI, and it will complete the XML portion for you. At any rate, XAML is still a ways off, and from what I can tell, isn't feature-complete yet, so you still have plenty of time to
learn it if you want to.

What's particularly interesting is the non-MS world's (primarily the Linux
crowd) take on XAML. From the blogs and reviews that I've seen, they are
taking this as a serious threat to web (in their opinion web = HTML)
applications. The threat for them is that MS is creating a superior model
that is extremely easy to use, and (the dangerous part) completely bypasses the W3C standards board (or any standards board for that matter). The fear
is that people will find the flexibility and ease of use so compelling that they won't care that XAML only runs on Windows - just like most of the HTM L today is written for IE, and not as generic HTML that any browser can use,
but worse. There are already a few projects (and the MONO guys are in on
this too) to create XAML for non-Windows platforms. In my opinion, this will only help accelerate the adoption of XAML, and quicken the demise of HTML
for web apps (which may not be exactly what they had in mind?) Therefore,
ignoring XAML completely will probably not be a good idea in the long run.

-Rob Teixeira [MVP]

"Thilaka" <th*****@mymail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Hi guys,

Recently i read some articles on Longhorn & XAML.
& From what i learnt the future for developing UIs lies in XAML.
Does this mean that I've got to learn XAML as developing UIs for web or

win
applications will be different?
Or will future versions of VS.Net wrap up the XAML hence making it
unnecessary for me to know or learn XAML?

--
Besty Regards,
Thilaka


Nov 20 '05 #3

P: n/a

Yeah dude, well ansewred. =)

thanks,
cj
"Rob Teixeira [MVP]" <RobTeixeira@@msn.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
If you already are using VB.NET, you will still be able to create windows
applications without XAML.
XAML just provides a way to create a UI using XML (and an associated .NET
code-behind type file, .vb, .cs, etc). IMHO, this, coupled with newer .NET
deployment models will eventually wipe out HTML applications. HTML will
still be a popular mechanism for doing what it was originally designed for - content/layout. But the ease of creating and deploying rich apps that don't have the limitations of browsers and script will catch on quick. For
example, I know a lot of IT technicians and admins that write simple utility scripts - they will now be able to create a complete tool UI in XML using
XAML. But think of XAML only as a way to provide a UI definition using XML. That's about all it is. This won't substitute creating EXEs in as much as
you will still be able to create these without XAML. Eventually, there will be designers that will allow you to "paint" the UI, and it will complete the XML portion for you. At any rate, XAML is still a ways off, and from what I can tell, isn't feature-complete yet, so you still have plenty of time to
learn it if you want to.

What's particularly interesting is the non-MS world's (primarily the Linux
crowd) take on XAML. From the blogs and reviews that I've seen, they are
taking this as a serious threat to web (in their opinion web = HTML)
applications. The threat for them is that MS is creating a superior model
that is extremely easy to use, and (the dangerous part) completely bypasses the W3C standards board (or any standards board for that matter). The fear
is that people will find the flexibility and ease of use so compelling that they won't care that XAML only runs on Windows - just like most of the HTML today is written for IE, and not as generic HTML that any browser can use,
but worse. There are already a few projects (and the MONO guys are in on
this too) to create XAML for non-Windows platforms. In my opinion, this will only help accelerate the adoption of XAML, and quicken the demise of HTML
for web apps (which may not be exactly what they had in mind?) Therefore,
ignoring XAML completely will probably not be a good idea in the long run.

-Rob Teixeira [MVP]

"Thilaka" <th*****@mymail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Hi guys,

Recently i read some articles on Longhorn & XAML.
& From what i learnt the future for developing UIs lies in XAML.
Does this mean that I've got to learn XAML as developing UIs for web or

win
applications will be different?
Or will future versions of VS.Net wrap up the XAML hence making it
unnecessary for me to know or learn XAML?

--
Besty Regards,
Thilaka


Nov 20 '05 #4

P: n/a

Yeah dude, well ansewred. =)

thanks,
cj
"Rob Teixeira [MVP]" <RobTeixeira@@msn.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
If you already are using VB.NET, you will still be able to create windows
applications without XAML.
XAML just provides a way to create a UI using XML (and an associated .NET
code-behind type file, .vb, .cs, etc). IMHO, this, coupled with newer .NET
deployment models will eventually wipe out HTML applications. HTML will
still be a popular mechanism for doing what it was originally designed for - content/layout. But the ease of creating and deploying rich apps that don't have the limitations of browsers and script will catch on quick. For
example, I know a lot of IT technicians and admins that write simple utility scripts - they will now be able to create a complete tool UI in XML using
XAML. But think of XAML only as a way to provide a UI definition using XML. That's about all it is. This won't substitute creating EXEs in as much as
you will still be able to create these without XAML. Eventually, there will be designers that will allow you to "paint" the UI, and it will complete the XML portion for you. At any rate, XAML is still a ways off, and from what I can tell, isn't feature-complete yet, so you still have plenty of time to
learn it if you want to.

What's particularly interesting is the non-MS world's (primarily the Linux
crowd) take on XAML. From the blogs and reviews that I've seen, they are
taking this as a serious threat to web (in their opinion web = HTML)
applications. The threat for them is that MS is creating a superior model
that is extremely easy to use, and (the dangerous part) completely bypasses the W3C standards board (or any standards board for that matter). The fear
is that people will find the flexibility and ease of use so compelling that they won't care that XAML only runs on Windows - just like most of the HTML today is written for IE, and not as generic HTML that any browser can use,
but worse. There are already a few projects (and the MONO guys are in on
this too) to create XAML for non-Windows platforms. In my opinion, this will only help accelerate the adoption of XAML, and quicken the demise of HTML
for web apps (which may not be exactly what they had in mind?) Therefore,
ignoring XAML completely will probably not be a good idea in the long run.

-Rob Teixeira [MVP]

"Thilaka" <th*****@mymail.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
Hi guys,

Recently i read some articles on Longhorn & XAML.
& From what i learnt the future for developing UIs lies in XAML.
Does this mean that I've got to learn XAML as developing UIs for web or

win
applications will be different?
Or will future versions of VS.Net wrap up the XAML hence making it
unnecessary for me to know or learn XAML?

--
Besty Regards,
Thilaka


Nov 20 '05 #5

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.