468,133 Members | 1,658 Online
Bytes | Developer Community
New Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Post your question to a community of 468,133 developers. It's quick & easy.

Interview questions for VB.NET

Hi,

I'm currently preparing for an interview on VB.Net Development.. could
someone please give me an idea as to what type of questions can one ask
(it's a practical test) and what sort of things I should be prepared
for? It's going to be on VB.Net and connectivity with SQL Server
perhaps.. any help would be appreciated. Thank you
Rick

Nov 20 '05 #1
23 26759
Cor
Hi Rick,
Are you giving the interview or going to it?
And who are the others?
(Kids, teachers, collegue)
Maybe we when we know that we can give you a better answer.
Cor
Nov 20 '05 #2
I'm going for one.. a practical VB.Net interview test. The others are
most probably VB.Net experts/MCSDs/intermetiate programmers and
developers. I have thorough knowledge of VB.Net/C# but I have no clue
what to expect. Thanks

Rick

Cor wrote:
Hi Rick,
Are you giving the interview or going to it?
And who are the others?
(Kids, teachers, collegue)
Maybe we when we know that we can give you a better answer.
Cor


Nov 20 '05 #3
Hi Rick, my 10 cents worth. Most recently I went for several interviews
about a year ago and that had 3 practical tests at 3 different companies. It
was for a Java developer position but the argument if valid never-the-less.
I was warned beforehand there would be a Java aptitude practical.

Two companies did standard core library stuff, and that was fair and it
sorted the wheat from the shaff.
One company did Java and JavaMail stuff and I felt annoyed because it wasn't
a Java practical test, it was a practical test on what are non-core classes.
JavaMail was just another API to learn, which I could have easily done, but
first exposure and heavy emphasis during this particular interview was a
waste of everyones time. It is only my opinion but I think SQL Server
integration is in the same boat.

So, from an interviewees perspective, a VB.Net interview practical is fine,
but please tell the candidates beforehand that you are looking at database
integration. I have been commercially programming in VB.Net and C# for just
under a year now and because of the type of applications I am writing, have
no database integration knowledge (in C# or VB.Net, certainly in Java and
VB6). But when the need comes, no big deal.

I would start with the standard verbal question fodder on inheritence,
overriding and overloading, interfaces and (abstract) must-inherit classes,
the event-model before moving onto the practical component. For this I would
write a small working application beforehand, something like a "Form1" MDI
container with some MDI children implementing an interface, a few overloaded
events, that requires modification for bug removal and feature enhancement.
And I would construct your practical, Step 1, Step 2, Step 3 itemising the
modifications. Please explain to the candidate to save for each step - you
don't want to reach the end of the interview and catch the candidate
debugging Step 7 only to find they can't roll-back to a working
implementation for Steps 1...6.
Frederic Marč
"Rick" <rrquick@nospam-com> wrote in message
news:3f******@clarion.carno.net.au...
Hi,

I'm currently preparing for an interview on VB.Net Development.. could
someone please give me an idea as to what type of questions can one ask
(it's a practical test) and what sort of things I should be prepared
for? It's going to be on VB.Net and connectivity with SQL Server
perhaps.. any help would be appreciated. Thank you
Rick

Nov 20 '05 #4
Doh - just reread, you are the candidate not the interviewer. Ignore my
previous post.

Good Luck.

Nov 20 '05 #5
Cor
Rick,
Fred, said "ignore it", but he did real nice give you some things to keep in
mind I thought.
I would start with the standard verbal question fodder on inheritence,
overriding and overloading, interfaces and (abstract) must-inherit classes,
the event-model before moving onto the practical component. For this I wouldwrite a small working application beforehand, something like a "Form1" MDI
container with some MDI children implementing an interface, a few overloadedevents, that requires modification for bug removal and feature enhancement.And I would construct your practical, Step 1, Step 2, Step 3 itemising the
modifications. Please explain to the candidate to save for each step - you
don't want to reach the end of the interview and catch the candidate
debugging Step 7 only to find they can't roll-back to a working
implementation for Steps 1...6.


Cor
Nov 20 '05 #6
Rick,
I would suggest that reading all the newsgroups questions and
trying to answer them yourself without referring to the answers people have
given is a great way to learn in association with reading through a book
real quick.

Ask yourself to explain in writing the basic building blocks of .NET and how
the major components work together, that will highlight what areas you are
weak on the understanding of.

Ive only been involved with VB.NET for 6 months, but I have an awfull lot to
learn yet.

HTH
Rick wrote:
Hi,

I'm currently preparing for an interview on VB.Net Development.. could
someone please give me an idea as to what type of questions can one
ask (it's a practical test) and what sort of things I should be
prepared for? It's going to be on VB.Net and connectivity with SQL
Server perhaps.. any help would be appreciated. Thank you
Rick

Nov 20 '05 #7
Well for a guy that has been involved with VB.Net, you've got a lot to
offer!
Kind regards
Frederic Marč
"One Handed Man" <Bo****@Duck.net> wrote in message
news:bl**********@sparta.btinternet.com...
Rick,
I would suggest that reading all the newsgroups questions and
trying to answer them yourself without referring to the answers people have given is a great way to learn in association with reading through a book
real quick.

Ask yourself to explain in writing the basic building blocks of .NET and how the major components work together, that will highlight what areas you are
weak on the understanding of.

Ive only been involved with VB.NET for 6 months, but I have an awfull lot to learn yet.

HTH
Rick wrote:
Hi,

I'm currently preparing for an interview on VB.Net Development.. could
someone please give me an idea as to what type of questions can one
ask (it's a practical test) and what sort of things I should be
prepared for? It's going to be on VB.Net and connectivity with SQL
Server perhaps.. any help would be appreciated. Thank you
Rick


Nov 20 '05 #8
No worries Fred :) That helped as well! Though it would be swell if you
could share some practical interviewing experiences with me, I'd really
appreciate it. Thanks for your time!

Rick

fred wrote:
Doh - just reread, you are the candidate not the interviewer. Ignore my
previous post.

Good Luck.


Nov 20 '05 #9
"One Handed Man" <Bo****@Duck.net> scripsit:
I would suggest that reading all the newsgroups questions and
trying to answer them yourself without referring to the answers people have
given is a great way to learn in association with reading through a book
real quick.


Excellent answer!

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
<http://www.mvps.org/dotnet>
Nov 20 '05 #10
No experience to offer. But count yourself lucky that you're doing a
programming aptitude test, not one of those other 'bullshit' psychometric
tests created by 'experts'.

http://www.shlgroup.com
"Rick" <rrquick@nospam-com> wrote in message
news:3f********@clarion.carno.net.au...
No worries Fred :) That helped as well! Though it would be swell if you
could share some practical interviewing experiences with me, I'd really
appreciate it. Thanks for your time!

Rick

fred wrote:
Doh - just reread, you are the candidate not the interviewer. Ignore my
previous post.

Good Luck.

Nov 20 '05 #11
Thank you !

Herfried K. Wagner [MVP] wrote:
"One Handed Man" <Bo****@Duck.net> scripsit:
I would suggest that reading all the newsgroups questions and
trying to answer them yourself without referring to the answers
people have given is a great way to learn in association with
reading through a book real quick.


Excellent answer!

Nov 20 '05 #12
Thank you !

fred wrote:
Well for a guy that has been involved with VB.Net, you've got a lot to
offer!
Kind regards
Frederic Marč
"One Handed Man" <Bo****@Duck.net> wrote in message
news:bl**********@sparta.btinternet.com...
Rick,
I would suggest that reading all the newsgroups
questions and trying to answer them yourself without referring to
the answers people have given is a great way to learn in association
with reading through a book real quick.

Ask yourself to explain in writing the basic building blocks of .NET
and how the major components work together, that will highlight what
areas you are weak on the understanding of.

Ive only been involved with VB.NET for 6 months, but I have an
awfull lot to learn yet.

HTH
Rick wrote:
Hi,

I'm currently preparing for an interview on VB.Net Development..
could someone please give me an idea as to what type of questions
can one ask (it's a practical test) and what sort of things I
should be prepared for? It's going to be on VB.Net and connectivity
with SQL Server perhaps.. any help would be appreciated. Thank you
Rick

Nov 20 '05 #13


fred wrote:
No experience to offer.
I mean, could you share some questions that were asked from you? I
really have no idea and I'm a little tensed :(
But count yourself lucky that you're doing a
programming aptitude test, not one of those other 'bullshit' psychometric
tests created by 'experts'.


Thanks :)
Rick

Nov 20 '05 #14
To be honest I can't remember all. But (it was Java remember) I wasn't asked
anything web, or database, ... mostly it was real core material and the
basic I should have known.

a) One person asked me how I would write a class to record things during a
program execution, to be shared by all programs in the class. Basically she
wanted to know how I create a text file containing messages like "performing
such routine, X=9", which was just writing out to a file. But because it was
shared, he was really asking me how I would write a "singleton", which
fortunately I knew. But we talked about it for more than 20 minutes.
b) There were lots of questions for user-input validation, converting from
Strings to Integers, Floating points etc and trapping errors, or throwing
errors up the call-stack, loss of precision during conversions etc because
of the datatype. One of his questions was how to validate a string entered
by user and checking to see if it was either a number with no decimal
points, or decimal points of 1/2.
c) There were questions of string tokenization and manipulation - but all
that is easy as how much of every day is spent playing and manipulating
strings so I knew it?
d) there were questions on subclassing/inheritence - what methods were
inherited, which were accessible (protected vs. private) and things like
that.

I might think that one of the questions, and I havent been to .Net
interviews, in addition to this might be converting or using code from other
..NET languages - see how they differ or aware of these other languages (C#,
J#, and managed C++) and whether you have problem wth it. As One Handed Man
<Bo****@Duck.net> says, just read this group and find out all the problems
people are having - they fall into core set.

I hope you will post some of them when you come back from the interview if
allowed.
Frederic Marč

"fred" <fr**@anon.com> wrote in message
news:10****************@doris.uk.clara.net...
No experience to offer. But count yourself lucky that you're doing a
programming aptitude test, not one of those other 'bullshit' psychometric
tests created by 'experts'.

http://www.shlgroup.com
"Rick" <rrquick@nospam-com> wrote in message
news:3f********@clarion.carno.net.au...
No worries Fred :) That helped as well! Though it would be swell if you
could share some practical interviewing experiences with me, I'd really
appreciate it. Thanks for your time!

Rick

fred wrote:
Doh - just reread, you are the candidate not the interviewer. Ignore my previous post.

Good Luck.


Nov 20 '05 #15
> I hope you will post some of them when you come back from the interview if
allowed.
Frederic Marč


Thanks for the tips Fred :) Sure, I definitely will post them up ;)

Rick

Nov 20 '05 #16
This question is too fun to pass up.

If you were going to give a data access interview, my generalist questions
would be stuff like:

1) When should you use a DataAdapter and when should you use a datareader
2) Describe the relationship between Datasets, datatables, and datarows
4) What is a typed dataset. What are the pros and cons of using one.
5) What are the two built in namespaces for data access and how do they
differ
6) Describe how you would filter a datatable
7) What do each of the following do: ExecuteReader, ExecuteScalar,
ExecuteNonQuery
8) What is the minimum you must supply to SQLDB Parameters? To OLEDB
Parameters?
9) Describe some options for storing connection strings in windows and web
applications.

"Herfried K. Wagner [MVP]" <hi***************@gmx.at> wrote in message
news:u5**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
"One Handed Man" <Bo****@Duck.net> scripsit:
I would suggest that reading all the newsgroups questions and
trying to answer them yourself without referring to the answers people have given is a great way to learn in association with reading through a book
real quick.


Excellent answer!

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
<http://www.mvps.org/dotnet>

Nov 20 '05 #17
On Wed, 01 Oct 2003 17:38:04 +1000, Rick <rrquick@nospam-com> wrote:
I'm currently preparing for an interview on VB.Net Development.. could
someone please give me an idea as to what type of questions can one ask
(it's a practical test) and what sort of things I should be prepared
for? It's going to be on VB.Net and connectivity with SQL Server
perhaps.. any help would be appreciated. Thank you


Always try to get some detail in advance of the practical. For
example, you say SQL connectivity might be involved. That covers a
lot of area, and may involve ADO.NET or it may be SQL query language.
Though you're better knowing both of course, if you know the scope in
advance you can bone up on it. Some organizations may not tell you,
but most will give you a general list of topics.

Most programming practicals have the basics as part of them, such as
can you write a pre-test condition loop, or basic input/output
statements. They also will usually have simple array questions and a
function/sub creation portion. In VB.NET you may also get basic
controls or user interface type questions. All these are designed to
weed out the applicants who look good on paper but hav no real
programming abilities.

You also may get a couple mini-programming tasks which start as a
vague request, the kind a user might have. You might have one like
"The accounting department needs a way to query monthly telephone
usage from our internal SQL contact database and extrapolate that for
client billing." You need to ask questions of the interviewer about
how the data is to be displayed or manipulated, how thw billing is to
be accomplished and so on. They'll give you the table structure for
the SQL database, and an hour to write the application. Usually what
they're looking for is how you approach the task, how you write code,
what logic you may have involved and so on. These tests are more
common when you're not going to be part of a project team, but they
are good for determining a candidate's thought processes.

The hard ones are often the more obscure questions, dealing with
debugging existing code for example. You need to have a solid grasp
of the syntax as well as the programming design and concept process to
get through these with flying colors. The only way you make it
through these is by knowing the langauge cold and having a working
experience in programming. For an entry level position the score may
not matter on these, or it may be all the interview team looks at.

We usually do a strengths/weaknesses chart of applicants, and compare
them. We never have the perfect candidate, and we purposely use some
interview questions and even testing questions that have no legitimate
answer. These are to see how the applicant reacts, which is often the
deciding factor in hiring. An applicant that approaches the problem,
figures out they don't know how to handle it or that there may not be
a correct answer and admits it is more valuable than one who tries to
fake his way through.

Since we always hire a candidate who doesn't have every single skill
we need, we hire the one who best compliments our existing staff and
who has the ability to learn the missing skills. So don't be
discouraged if you don't get the job even if you seemed like a great
candidate, sometimes the decision isn't based on your ability but
rather the abilities misisng at the hiring organization.

Good luck.

Jeff
Nov 20 '05 #18

PS: They are good ADO questions though, I would add the following.

1.) You have two datagrids on one windows form, you have a dataset with two
related tables in a one to many relationship. How can you synchronise them
without adding hardly any extra code ?

2.) Explain the Binding Manager classes and how the can relate to DataView,
DataGrid.

3.) You have a DataGrid, you need to ensure that your records primary keys
dont conflict with the SQL database when doing an Update(). How can you
acheive this.

4.) Write and update.command string, NOW RIGHT NOW, for an imaginary 15
Field DataTable

;-D
Justin Weinberg wrote:
This question is too fun to pass up.

If you were going to give a data access interview, my generalist
questions would be stuff like:

1) When should you use a DataAdapter and when should you use a
datareader 2) Describe the relationship between Datasets,
datatables, and datarows 4) What is a typed dataset. What are the
pros and cons of using one. 5) What are the two built in namespaces
for data access and how do they differ
6) Describe how you would filter a datatable
7) What do each of the following do: ExecuteReader, ExecuteScalar,
ExecuteNonQuery
8) What is the minimum you must supply to SQLDB Parameters? To
OLEDB Parameters?
9) Describe some options for storing connection strings in windows
and web applications.

"Herfried K. Wagner [MVP]" <hi***************@gmx.at> wrote in message
news:u5**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
"One Handed Man" <Bo****@Duck.net> scripsit:
I would suggest that reading all the newsgroups questions and
trying to answer them yourself without referring to the answers
people have given is a great way to learn in association with
reading through a book real quick.


Excellent answer!

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
<http://www.mvps.org/dotnet>

Nov 20 '05 #19
Very true.

OHM

Jeff Cochran wrote:
On Wed, 01 Oct 2003 17:38:04 +1000, Rick <rrquick@nospam-com> wrote:
I'm currently preparing for an interview on VB.Net Development..
could someone please give me an idea as to what type of questions
can one ask (it's a practical test) and what sort of things I should
be prepared for? It's going to be on VB.Net and connectivity with
SQL Server perhaps.. any help would be appreciated. Thank you


Always try to get some detail in advance of the practical. For
example, you say SQL connectivity might be involved. That covers a
lot of area, and may involve ADO.NET or it may be SQL query language.
Though you're better knowing both of course, if you know the scope in
advance you can bone up on it. Some organizations may not tell you,
but most will give you a general list of topics.

Most programming practicals have the basics as part of them, such as
can you write a pre-test condition loop, or basic input/output
statements. They also will usually have simple array questions and a
function/sub creation portion. In VB.NET you may also get basic
controls or user interface type questions. All these are designed to
weed out the applicants who look good on paper but hav no real
programming abilities.

You also may get a couple mini-programming tasks which start as a
vague request, the kind a user might have. You might have one like
"The accounting department needs a way to query monthly telephone
usage from our internal SQL contact database and extrapolate that for
client billing." You need to ask questions of the interviewer about
how the data is to be displayed or manipulated, how thw billing is to
be accomplished and so on. They'll give you the table structure for
the SQL database, and an hour to write the application. Usually what
they're looking for is how you approach the task, how you write code,
what logic you may have involved and so on. These tests are more
common when you're not going to be part of a project team, but they
are good for determining a candidate's thought processes.

The hard ones are often the more obscure questions, dealing with
debugging existing code for example. You need to have a solid grasp
of the syntax as well as the programming design and concept process to
get through these with flying colors. The only way you make it
through these is by knowing the langauge cold and having a working
experience in programming. For an entry level position the score may
not matter on these, or it may be all the interview team looks at.

We usually do a strengths/weaknesses chart of applicants, and compare
them. We never have the perfect candidate, and we purposely use some
interview questions and even testing questions that have no legitimate
answer. These are to see how the applicant reacts, which is often the
deciding factor in hiring. An applicant that approaches the problem,
figures out they don't know how to handle it or that there may not be
a correct answer and admits it is more valuable than one who tries to
fake his way through.

Since we always hire a candidate who doesn't have every single skill
we need, we hire the one who best compliments our existing staff and
who has the ability to learn the missing skills. So don't be
discouraged if you don't get the job even if you seemed like a great
candidate, sometimes the decision isn't based on your ability but
rather the abilities misisng at the hiring organization.

Good luck.

Jeff

Nov 20 '05 #20
That was a great run down! Thanks Jeff, I really appreciate it. I'll
give it my best shot and see what happens :)
Rick

Nov 20 '05 #21
hi sir
I HAVE NOT DON VB6.0 AND HAVE DON VB.NET FIND IT DIFICULT WHT WOULD I
DO OI DONT NO PLZ TELL ME .I WANNA BCOME A SUCESS FULL PROGRAMMER IN
VB.NET.PLZ HELP ME.

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Don't just participate in USENET...get rewarded for it!
Nov 21 '05 #22
Tell me, can you tie your own shoelaces, or do you want us to help you with
that as well ?

--

OHM ( Terry Burns )
. . . One-Handed-Man . . .
If U Need My Email ,Ask Me

Time flies when you don't know what you're doing

"maruf khan" <ma********@rediffmail.com> wrote in message
news:e9**************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
hi sir
I HAVE NOT DON VB6.0 AND HAVE DON VB.NET FIND IT DIFICULT WHT WOULD I
DO OI DONT NO PLZ TELL ME .I WANNA BCOME A SUCESS FULL PROGRAMMER IN
VB.NET.PLZ HELP ME.

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Don't just participate in USENET...get rewarded for it!

Nov 21 '05 #23
go to library and get the book for vb.net
regards,

maruf khan wrote:
hi sir
I HAVE NOT DON VB6.0 AND HAVE DON VB.NET FIND IT DIFICULT WHT WOULD I
DO OI DONT NO PLZ TELL ME .I WANNA BCOME A SUCESS FULL PROGRAMMER IN
VB.NET.PLZ HELP ME.

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Don't just participate in USENET...get rewarded for it!


Nov 21 '05 #24

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.

Similar topics

reply views Thread by softwareengineer2006 | last post: by
reply views Thread by connectrajesh | last post: by
reply views Thread by ramu | last post: by
1 post views Thread by gcdp | last post: by
By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.