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VB.Net is overtaking C#

P: n/a
vb
This newsgroup was much less active than the C# group a year or so
ago. But the last few months, its geting much more traffic. My
theory is that there were more C# folks at first, because:

1. Lots of Java guys were hungry for a way out
2. C++ programmers were more likely to be first-movers toward a new
technology (dot net) in general, thus C#
3. VB6 and classic ASP code just now starting to get ported, thus,
VB.Net just starting to build momentum.

Overall I predict VB.Net is much wider used. In our shop, I've
already seen C++ and Java guys convert to VB.Net because its more
productive.
Nov 20 '05 #1
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33 Replies


P: n/a
Agreed of course. It used to be that VB6 was a "toy" language, not worthy
to stand in a C++ programmers precesnse. Even though what would take them a
week we would do in an hour with our dandy VB6.

Now, VB6 did have its problems, but was easy to read and understand. And
now with a OO style its much more friendly to ol' c++ programmers.

Still documentation could be better on something. Also, I like in C# how
you "seem" to have more control over your events (add and remove for
example, I haven't figured out how to customize those in VB.NET yet). But
otherwise everything I've "wanted" to do in VB.NEt has been possible. And
its readable. =)

{ } get a little tough to read when there are 13 of them nested in a method.

-cJ
"vb" <vb@vb.Com> wrote in message
news:9l********************************@4ax.com...
This newsgroup was much less active than the C# group a year or so
ago. But the last few months, its geting much more traffic. My
theory is that there were more C# folks at first, because:

1. Lots of Java guys were hungry for a way out
2. C++ programmers were more likely to be first-movers toward a new
technology (dot net) in general, thus C#
3. VB6 and classic ASP code just now starting to get ported, thus,
VB.Net just starting to build momentum.

Overall I predict VB.Net is much wider used. In our shop, I've
already seen C++ and Java guys convert to VB.Net because its more
productive.

Nov 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
I think its horses for courses really.

I chose VB.NET because I didnt want to learn the intracies of C# as well as
the .NET framework.
just too much brain power needed in one go.

Once I get comfortable with the those two, I might try and learn C#

"CJ Taylor" <no****@blowgoats.com> wrote in message
news:%2****************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Agreed of course. It used to be that VB6 was a "toy" language, not worthy
to stand in a C++ programmers precesnse. Even though what would take them a week we would do in an hour with our dandy VB6.

Now, VB6 did have its problems, but was easy to read and understand. And
now with a OO style its much more friendly to ol' c++ programmers.

Still documentation could be better on something. Also, I like in C# how
you "seem" to have more control over your events (add and remove for
example, I haven't figured out how to customize those in VB.NET yet). But
otherwise everything I've "wanted" to do in VB.NEt has been possible. And
its readable. =)

{ } get a little tough to read when there are 13 of them nested in a method.
-cJ
"vb" <vb@vb.Com> wrote in message
news:9l********************************@4ax.com...
This newsgroup was much less active than the C# group a year or so
ago. But the last few months, its geting much more traffic. My
theory is that there were more C# folks at first, because:

1. Lots of Java guys were hungry for a way out
2. C++ programmers were more likely to be first-movers toward a new
technology (dot net) in general, thus C#
3. VB6 and classic ASP code just now starting to get ported, thus,
VB.Net just starting to build momentum.

Overall I predict VB.Net is much wider used. In our shop, I've
already seen C++ and Java guys convert to VB.Net because its more
productive.


Nov 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
>...Also, I like in C# how
you "seem" to have more control over your events (add and remove forexample, I haven't figured out how to customize those in

VB.NET yet).

Are you familiar with AddHandler and RemoveHandler?
Nov 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
Of course I am. =)

You don't want to know how familiar, but in C# its just a little easier to
handle some things..

The truth is, C# and VB are incredibly similar in the .NET framework. Sure
there are some differences but I've programmed in both and its mainly
structuring. It's not like C# is like C++ where you can really get into low
level functions (you can, but who really cares, the .NET framework provides
that complex stuff for us).

All I have noticed is just structuring and keywords. Not really much else.

For example, J#, .NET language, no actual Java functionality. =) At least
from what I've read, you can't complile to a Java class, which seems kinda
dumb. =) But I understand why. Structure.

"Lance" <zi***@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:12****************************@phx.gbl...
...Also, I like in C# how
you "seem" to have more control over your events (add

and remove for
example, I haven't figured out how to customize those in

VB.NET yet).

Are you familiar with AddHandler and RemoveHandler?

Nov 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
vb
On Fri, 19 Sep 2003 10:35:09 -0400, "William Ryan"
<do********@comcast.nospam.net> wrote:

I think the whole debate over the languages is rather insipid, but In my
experience, VB.NEt took off quicker but C# is probably going to be the more
adopted language.


The opposite appears to be true when I look at job openings on job ad
sites, and traffic in this NG.
Nov 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
You think people that are hiring for .NET programmers *actually* know what
they are looking for?

Most managers don't seem to know what .NET is except a new set of languages
(if that), something called a "framework" and is supposed to make something
easier. Welcome to the powers of marketing.

I've programmed .NET for awhile, and my job requested it when I started...
I'm still the only one that knows anything about .NET and what it "does."
here.

But, they think C# will get them better programmers, doesn't matter, enough
friggin converters out there it doesn't matter what language you program
in...

CJ

"vb" <vb@vb.Com> wrote in message
news:bj********************************@4ax.com...
On Fri, 19 Sep 2003 10:35:09 -0400, "William Ryan"
<do********@comcast.nospam.net> wrote:

I think the whole debate over the languages is rather insipid, but In my
experience, VB.NEt took off quicker but C# is probably going to be the moreadopted language.


The opposite appears to be true when I look at job openings on job ad
sites, and traffic in this NG.

Nov 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
>
I think the whole debate over the languages is rather insipid,
Agreed.
but In my
experience, VB.NEt took off quicker but C# is probably going to be the more adopted language.


Having worked with .net since the early betas, I have to disagree with that.
Almost all documentation written before the official launch was in C#. The
samples were also in C# for the mojor part. MS seemed to start pushing
VB.NET againg only late in 2001, updating documentation and samples.
But now I'm starting to see a lot of VB.NET code and jobs openings all over
the place and that makes me think that the exisiting VB6 developers are
showing their migration path.


--
TJoker, MCSD.NET
MVP: Paint, Notepad, Solitaire

****************************************

Nov 20 '05 #8

P: n/a
Yes, I -learned- C# only in the fact that I had to translate so many
examples from C# to VB - I have Visual Studio Standard (VB) and when I
bought it, it was only a month or two old and almost all examples in any
books I could find were in C#.

Now though I see many books with examples in both languages, this makes for
a bigger and more expensive books though, I could program in C#, but VB
seems easier to work with for me, and that is what it is all about, making
it easier on the developer to develop, in whatever language he/she is
comfortable with.

Severin


"TJoker .NET [MVP]" <no****@nonono.no> wrote in message
news:up**************@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...

I think the whole debate over the languages is rather insipid,
Agreed.
but In my
experience, VB.NEt took off quicker but C# is probably going to be the

more
adopted language.


Having worked with .net since the early betas, I have to disagree with

that. Almost all documentation written before the official launch was in C#. The
samples were also in C# for the mojor part. MS seemed to start pushing
VB.NET againg only late in 2001, updating documentation and samples.
But now I'm starting to see a lot of VB.NET code and jobs openings all over the place and that makes me think that the exisiting VB6 developers are
showing their migration path.


--
TJoker, MCSD.NET
MVP: Paint, Notepad, Solitaire

****************************************

Nov 20 '05 #9

P: n/a
Traffic in NG's can be attributed to many things. There are a whole lot of
other sites with Forums in them dedicated to C#. From this ng, I see 22800
vs. 22047 VB.NET vs. C#.I don't have them on me right now, but it was Visual
Studio Mag I think, I'll find out for sure where the whole contention was
the opposite, not to mention that C# programmers made notably more money.
Also, I haven't seen the same thing you report in the online job sites, but
if you compare the salaries of jobs, I don't think it's even close. You
can't really compare 35k Job with a 70K vb Job and say that it's the
language that's the difference. There aren't many low level C# jobs so the
fact that there be more jobs overall doesn't mean one is overtaking the
other. Moreover, the price C# programmers command can also explain why
their may be more jobs in VB.NET but I haven't even seen that to be the
case.

As far as MS's preferred language...If you get a book on .NET and not one
particular language, I can name quite a few, they are either exclusively C#
or heavily weighted to C#.

Once again, I think the whole distinction between the two is trivial b/c
what counts is Programmers that Know .NET conceptually, syntax programmers
are now, and always will be second rate at best. Technologies like the
Compact Framework, ADO.NET, ASP.NET, are totally agnostic to the
language...so if you need a top notch ADO.NET programmer, only a fool would
want a person with proficiency in one language but a lack in the given
technology (ado.net in this case).

Who knows in the end, but from my experience, C# and VB.NET are both poised
to be successful and live together happily.
"vb" <vb@vb.Com> wrote in message
news:bj********************************@4ax.com...
On Fri, 19 Sep 2003 10:35:09 -0400, "William Ryan"
<do********@comcast.nospam.net> wrote:

I think the whole debate over the languages is rather insipid, but In my
experience, VB.NEt took off quicker but C# is probably going to be the moreadopted language.


The opposite appears to be true when I look at job openings on job ad
sites, and traffic in this NG.

Nov 20 '05 #10

P: n/a
Herfried:

You are much closer than I am to the inside so I stand corrected on the C#
being the preferred langauge... but I still think that it is. To be
honest, I truly hope that you're correct, I hope MS supports and pushes both
of the equally, now and in the future. I'm not a C# or VB.NET partisan btw,
there's a lot to love about both languages.
I can post plenty of links to support this, but this whole issue gets wayyyy
too emotional When Charles Petzold writes his book in VB.NET, Jeffrey
Richter rewrites Applied Microsoft .NET Framework in VB.NET,John Robbins
Adds more than on page of VB.NET code in his Debugging book and VB.NET
includes support for Unsafe code, then I'll officially change my mind <Just
kidding everyone>
"Herfried K. Wagner [MVP]" <hi*******@m.activevb.de> wrote in message
news:On**************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Hello,

"William Ryan" <do********@comcast.nospam.net> schrieb:
As far as MS's preferred language...If you get a book on
.NET and not one particular language, I can name quite a
few, they are either exclusively C# or heavily weighted to C#.


According to Microsoft, VB.NET is "The most productive tool for building
.NET-connected applications".

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
http://www.mvps.org/dotnet

Nov 20 '05 #11

P: n/a
Start changing:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...064005073/sr=8
-2/ref=sr_8_2/104-9244424-4228753?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

:))
Petzold's book sucks, so leave it alone ;)

--
TJoker, MCSD.NET
MVP: Paint, Notepad, Solitaire

****************************************

When Charles Petzold writes his book in VB.NET, Jeffrey
Richter rewrites Applied Microsoft .NET Framework in VB.NET,John Robbins
Adds more than on page of VB.NET code in his Debugging book and VB.NET
includes support for Unsafe code, then I'll officially change my mind <Just kidding everyone>


Nov 20 '05 #12

P: n/a
Yeah, but Francesco did all of the coding.

Petzold's book does not suck! The words Petzold and suck shouldn't even be
allowed to be used in a sentence..not even like I just did ;-).

Alright, I give, MS loves VB More
"TJoker .NET [MVP]" <no****@nonono.no> wrote in message
news:u5**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Start changing:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg...064005073/sr=8 -2/ref=sr_8_2/104-9244424-4228753?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

:))
Petzold's book sucks, so leave it alone ;)

--
TJoker, MCSD.NET
MVP: Paint, Notepad, Solitaire

****************************************

When Charles Petzold writes his book in VB.NET, Jeffrey
Richter rewrites Applied Microsoft .NET Framework in VB.NET,John Robbins
Adds more than on page of VB.NET code in his Debugging book and VB.NET
includes support for Unsafe code, then I'll officially change my mind

<Just
kidding everyone>


Nov 20 '05 #13

P: n/a
Ok, Ok Ok already...I retract my previous statements. I officially have no
position on the subject except that J# definitely isn't taking off.

And I thought the C# guys were rough on me every time I defend VB.NET <g>
"vb" <vb@vb.Com> wrote in message
news:9l********************************@4ax.com...
This newsgroup was much less active than the C# group a year or so
ago. But the last few months, its geting much more traffic. My
theory is that there were more C# folks at first, because:

1. Lots of Java guys were hungry for a way out
2. C++ programmers were more likely to be first-movers toward a new
technology (dot net) in general, thus C#
3. VB6 and classic ASP code just now starting to get ported, thus,
VB.Net just starting to build momentum.

Overall I predict VB.Net is much wider used. In our shop, I've
already seen C++ and Java guys convert to VB.Net because its more
productive.

Nov 20 '05 #14

P: n/a

"William Ryan" <do********@comcast.nospam.net> wrote in message
news:uz**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
Ok, Ok Ok already...I retract my previous statements. I officially have no position on the subject except that J# definitely isn't taking off.
You expected it to???

This definatly looked like an intern summer project. I'm not saying the
"general concept" isn't good, you know, an easy conversion for Java
developers, but offer something differently.

I think it would be a lot more powerful if it could compile Javabyte code
which was platform indpendent. Basically, a .NET version of Java (combine
both Java libraries and .NET).

Which I know this isn't possible right now because .NET only runs on Windows
machines, but hell, the Mono project is coming along pretty well, or
gnunetgtk or whatever its called have finished like 40% of the framework so
far. I mean, they have the C# and VB compilers done for Unix so why not
integrate this with the Java libraries...

Now that would be a solution... But it will never happen. Because flamers
come in here talking of how mom and pop shops think Scott McNealy is god
(I'm not saying he's bad) will say its either Java or .NET, and heaven
forbid we find a happy medium and just get down to building some quality
friggin software instead of fighting over which language is best.

it's like a Jihad I swear... I can just picture the movie now. Gates and
Balmer doing ancient Chinese Meditation with Buddha, McNealy will be
practicing RPC exploits while praying to Mohommad, and the Lou Gershner will
just be watching wihle saying "We won't move *just* yet........ let them
fight it out a little first..."

Word...



And I thought the C# guys were rough on me every time I defend VB.NET <g>
"vb" <vb@vb.Com> wrote in message
news:9l********************************@4ax.com...
This newsgroup was much less active than the C# group a year or so
ago. But the last few months, its geting much more traffic. My
theory is that there were more C# folks at first, because:

1. Lots of Java guys were hungry for a way out
2. C++ programmers were more likely to be first-movers toward a new
technology (dot net) in general, thus C#
3. VB6 and classic ASP code just now starting to get ported, thus,
VB.Net just starting to build momentum.

Overall I predict VB.Net is much wider used. In our shop, I've
already seen C++ and Java guys convert to VB.Net because its more
productive.


Nov 20 '05 #15

P: n/a
Cor
CJ
You can picture a movie without woman in it, you where kidding?
:-))
Cor
Nov 20 '05 #16

P: n/a
No, the whole thought of angry slobbering ms hating Java programmers (I'm
referring to a specific subset, not say all Java programmers are like this)
coming on over to .NET always made me chuckle. I raised enough of a
stir..so I was just trying to be flippant with something everyone could
agree on ;-). You have some excellent poitns though.
"CJ Taylor" <no****@blowgoats.com> wrote in message
news:uf*************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...

"William Ryan" <do********@comcast.nospam.net> wrote in message
news:uz**************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
Ok, Ok Ok already...I retract my previous statements. I officially have no
position on the subject except that J# definitely isn't taking off.


You expected it to???

This definatly looked like an intern summer project. I'm not saying the
"general concept" isn't good, you know, an easy conversion for Java
developers, but offer something differently.

I think it would be a lot more powerful if it could compile Javabyte code
which was platform indpendent. Basically, a .NET version of Java (combine
both Java libraries and .NET).

Which I know this isn't possible right now because .NET only runs on

Windows machines, but hell, the Mono project is coming along pretty well, or
gnunetgtk or whatever its called have finished like 40% of the framework so far. I mean, they have the C# and VB compilers done for Unix so why not
integrate this with the Java libraries...

Now that would be a solution... But it will never happen. Because flamers
come in here talking of how mom and pop shops think Scott McNealy is god
(I'm not saying he's bad) will say its either Java or .NET, and heaven
forbid we find a happy medium and just get down to building some quality
friggin software instead of fighting over which language is best.

it's like a Jihad I swear... I can just picture the movie now. Gates and
Balmer doing ancient Chinese Meditation with Buddha, McNealy will be
practicing RPC exploits while praying to Mohommad, and the Lou Gershner will just be watching wihle saying "We won't move *just* yet........ let them
fight it out a little first..."

Word...



And I thought the C# guys were rough on me every time I defend VB.NET <g> "vb" <vb@vb.Com> wrote in message
news:9l********************************@4ax.com...
This newsgroup was much less active than the C# group a year or so
ago. But the last few months, its geting much more traffic. My
theory is that there were more C# folks at first, because:

1. Lots of Java guys were hungry for a way out
2. C++ programmers were more likely to be first-movers toward a new
technology (dot net) in general, thus C#
3. VB6 and classic ASP code just now starting to get ported, thus,
VB.Net just starting to build momentum.

Overall I predict VB.Net is much wider used. In our shop, I've
already seen C++ and Java guys convert to VB.Net because its more
productive.



Nov 20 '05 #17

P: n/a
Hello,

"William Ryan" <do********@comcast.nospam.net> schrieb:
You are much closer than I am to the inside so I stand
corrected on the C# being the preferred langauge...


I think Microsoft doesn't prefer any of the .NET languages, but it's true
that until now more programmers used C# than those who used VB.NET.
Nevertheless, at the beginning it seemed that C# was Microsoft's preferred
language, but IMO Microsoft more and more sees that VB.NET is the better
language.

You can see this in the text I posted in my previous post and the changes
that will be done in Whidbey, the next release of VS.NET. Operator
overloading will be added to VB.NET, generics will be added to both, C# and
VB.NET. Edit and Continue will be added to VB.NET (I am not sure if it will
be added to C#, but I don't think so). Now, VB.NET has a background
compiler, C# doesn't have one.

Microsoft was only strong with BASIC languages. Visual Basic Classic was a
flagship in the Microsoft product line of developer tools. And, last but
not least, Microsoft is the only company what develops good BASIC-style
programming languages.

An interesting detail is that although Microsoft was very successful with VB
Classic, I don't know any application developed by Microsoft using Visual
Basic. I think most Microsoft programmers use C++ and they may consider VB
Classic a toy language. VB.NET can be considered a toy language too in
matters of syntax, but it's now as powerful as all other .NET languages and
it will hopefully be more powerful than the other programming languages for
..NET.

SCNR

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
http://www.mvps.org/dotnet
Nov 20 '05 #18

P: n/a
Hello,

"William Ryan" <do********@comcast.nospam.net> schrieb:
Yeah, but Francesco did all of the coding.

Petzold's book does not suck! The words Petzold and suck
shouldn't even be allowed to be used in a sentence..not
even like I just did ;-).


If the book is not written in VB.NET, it _sucks_.

SCNR

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
http://www.mvps.org/dotnet
Nov 20 '05 #19

P: n/a
Hello,

"William Ryan" <do********@comcast.nospam.net> schrieb:
Ok, Ok Ok already...I retract my previous statements. I
officially have no position on the subject except that J#
definitely isn't taking off.


Is anybody here who knows someone using J#?!

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
http://www.mvps.org/dotnet
Nov 20 '05 #20

P: n/a
Hello,

"CJ Taylor" <no****@blowgoats.com> schrieb:
[J#]
I think it would be a lot more powerful if it could
compile Javabyte code which was platform indpendent.
Basically, a .NET version of Java (combine both Java libraries
and .NET).
Who needs Java byte code? Who needs Java?
Which I know this isn't possible right now because .NET only
runs on Windows machines, but hell, the Mono project is
coming along pretty well, or gnunetgtk or whatever its called have
finished like 40% of the framework so far. I mean, they have the
C# and VB compilers done for Unix so why not integrate this with
the Java libraries...


AFAIK Remotesoft (http://www.remotesoft.com/) develops a tool for bringing
..NET and Java together.

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
http://www.mvps.org/dotnet
Nov 20 '05 #21

P: n/a
Cor
Hi,

I found it strange but I don't read it anywhere. It seems if everybody
forget that there are millions of ASP web programmers who use vb.script to
make server side webpages. Now they have the change to make better and real
good solid OO serverside web programs, what is possible with the VB.net
language. (Also with C# that has a simple entree for the client side
programmer of the web (javascript) but I think that the serverside
programmers uses more VB.script).

Cor

Nov 20 '05 #22

P: n/a
Herfried:

I hope you are kidding. If not, I respectfully disagree. You can't
possibly say that anything Petzold has written 'sucks'. At worst someone
can say they didn't like it, but he's the man, been the man, continues to be
the man. What about Jeffrey Richter's solo .NET book? You can't say that
sucks too? What about John Robbins Debugging Book? What about Mueller's
Book? He couldn't write half of that deals with unsafe code.
I may have given the impression that I think C# is better, nothing could be
further from the truth. But each language has its advantages, and I think
partisans of either side have a little too much time on their hands.

However, something tells me you were just goofing on me and I just made a
jacka33 out of myself.

Either way..I already cried uncle, I was wrong.

:-) ''''And for penance, I will never, ever, ever get into a discussion
that includes C# and VB.NET in the same paragraph.
"Herfried K. Wagner [MVP]" <hi*******@m.activevb.de> wrote in message
news:#U**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Hello,

"William Ryan" <do********@comcast.nospam.net> schrieb:
Yeah, but Francesco did all of the coding.

Petzold's book does not suck! The words Petzold and suck
shouldn't even be allowed to be used in a sentence..not
even like I just did ;-).


If the book is not written in VB.NET, it _sucks_.

SCNR

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
http://www.mvps.org/dotnet

Nov 20 '05 #23

P: n/a
I will agree with one cavaet. Option Strict should be on by default. I
have been in x hundred numbers of arguments with VB6 programmers who won't
type their code and Pound their Spoons of their baby seats about the loss of
Variant. I could get my puppy to eat broccoli easier than convincing them
of not using Variant.

IMHO, VB got the whole unfair reputation b/c it let developers write stuff
(ie be productive) at the expense of writing code. Most professional
programmers didn't opt for this route but Many, too many did. There are
still too many of these folks. As far as MS goes..they are't embracing
VB.NET (their developers) b/c of 1) most of their developers are used to
C++/C and 2) A lot of code would need to be unsafe 3) They don't like cats
who espouse variant data type virtues calling them their peers <just kidding
on #3>

I have noticed though, that when I read MSDN, I don't see any advertisements
bragging about either 100% Visual Basic .NET or 100% .NET..it's always 100%
Managed Code in C#.

I think in the end, I think the nuances balance out. But when it's all said
and done, VB.NET isn't going to erase C# or Vice Versa. They are both here
to stay.

Cheers,

Bill
"Herfried K. Wagner [MVP]" <hi*******@m.activevb.de> wrote in message
news:#0*************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Hello,

"William Ryan" <do********@comcast.nospam.net> schrieb:
You are much closer than I am to the inside so I stand
corrected on the C# being the preferred langauge...
I think Microsoft doesn't prefer any of the .NET languages, but it's true
that until now more programmers used C# than those who used VB.NET.
Nevertheless, at the beginning it seemed that C# was Microsoft's preferred
language, but IMO Microsoft more and more sees that VB.NET is the better
language.

You can see this in the text I posted in my previous post and the changes
that will be done in Whidbey, the next release of VS.NET. Operator
overloading will be added to VB.NET, generics will be added to both, C#

and VB.NET. Edit and Continue will be added to VB.NET (I am not sure if it will be added to C#, but I don't think so). Now, VB.NET has a background
compiler, C# doesn't have one.

Microsoft was only strong with BASIC languages. Visual Basic Classic was a flagship in the Microsoft product line of developer tools. And, last but
not least, Microsoft is the only company what develops good BASIC-style
programming languages.

An interesting detail is that although Microsoft was very successful with VB Classic, I don't know any application developed by Microsoft using Visual
Basic. I think most Microsoft programmers use C++ and they may consider VB Classic a toy language. VB.NET can be considered a toy language too in
matters of syntax, but it's now as powerful as all other .NET languages and it will hopefully be more powerful than the other programming languages for .NET.

SCNR

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
http://www.mvps.org/dotnet

Nov 20 '05 #24

P: n/a
Hello,

"Cor" <no*@non.com> schrieb:
I found it strange but I don't read it anywhere. It seems if
everybody forget that there are millions of ASP web
programmers who use vb.script to make server side webpages.


Programmers <> Web Programmers

;-)

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
http://www.mvps.org/dotnet
Nov 20 '05 #25

P: n/a
But the last few months, its geting much more traffic.


While that might be true, I also feel that the signal-to-noise ratio
has dropped here lately.

Mattias

--
Mattias Sjögren [MVP] mattias @ mvps.org
http://www.msjogren.net/dotnet/
Please reply only to the newsgroup.
Nov 20 '05 #26

P: n/a
vb
On Sat, 20 Sep 2003 01:18:23 +0200, "Cor" <no*@non.com> wrote:
Hi,

I found it strange but I don't read it anywhere. It seems if everybody
forget that there are millions of ASP web programmers who use vb.script to
make server side webpages. Now they have the change to make better and real
good solid OO serverside web programs, what is possible with the VB.net
language. (Also with C# that has a simple entree for the client side
programmer of the web (javascript) but I think that the serverside
programmers uses more VB.script).

Cor


Someone hit the nail on the head! A lot of web developers only have
experience with ASP, VBScript, Javascript, etc. Which of the two
languages do you think they will prefer? I have already seen former
C++ guys that have been doing web development for the last 5 years
gravitate with a heavy bias toward VB.Net.

Just think of all the people that have done VBScript or VBA over the
last 5-6 years... They are going to be like ducks in water with
VB.Net.
Nov 20 '05 #27

P: n/a

"Herfried K. Wagner [MVP]" <hi*******@m.activevb.de> wrote in message
news:On**************@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
Hello,

"William Ryan" <do********@comcast.nospam.net> schrieb:
As far as MS's preferred language...If you get a book on
.NET and not one particular language, I can name quite a
few, they are either exclusively C# or heavily weighted to C#.


According to Microsoft, VB.NET is "The most productive tool for building
.NET-connected applications".


The roadmap is fairly clear; VB.NET will be "dumbed down" with more
automation to reduce the amount of time it takes to complete common
programming tasks and C# will evolve to include more advanced language
features.

Also, the fact that the VB.NET newsgroup is getting full doesn't necessarily
mean that it is overtaking C#, mearly that people are having more problems
with it! ;-)
Nov 20 '05 #28

P: n/a
Hello,

"Ed Crowley" <cu******@pacbell.net> schrieb:
The roadmap is fairly clear; VB.NET will be "dumbed down"
with more automation to reduce the amount of time it takes
to complete common programming tasks and C# will evolve
to include more advanced language features.


I don't think so. Advanced language features will, according to the
roadmap, included in VB.NET too.

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
http://www.mvps.org/dotnet
Nov 20 '05 #29

P: n/a

"Herfried K. Wagner [MVP]" <hi*******@m.activevb.de> wrote in message
news:uk**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Hello,

"Ed Crowley" <cu******@pacbell.net> schrieb:
The roadmap is fairly clear; VB.NET will be "dumbed down"
with more automation to reduce the amount of time it takes
to complete common programming tasks and C# will evolve
to include more advanced language features.


I don't think so. Advanced language features will, according to the
roadmap, included in VB.NET too.


Yes, but not as advanced as those being introduced to C#. I believe it is
Microsoft's intention to keep C# at the "bleeding edge" of the .NET
languages.
Nov 20 '05 #30

P: n/a
Hello,

"Ed Crowley" <cu******@pacbell.net> schrieb:
The roadmap is fairly clear; VB.NET will be "dumbed down"
with more automation to reduce the amount of time it takes
to complete common programming tasks and C# will evolve
to include more advanced language features.


I don't think so. Advanced language features will, according to the
roadmap, included in VB.NET too.


Yes, but not as advanced as those being introduced to C#. I
believe it is Microsoft's intention to keep C# at the "bleeding
edge" of the .NET languages.


;-)

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
http://www.mvps.org/dotnet
Nov 20 '05 #31

P: n/a
We all know that VB.NET is the best language ever.

--
HTH,
-- Tom Spink, Über Geek

Please respond to the newsgroup,
so all can benefit

"Chaos, Panic, Disorder, my work here is done"
"William Ryan" <do********@nospam.comcast.net> wrote in message
news:en*************@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
: Herfried:
:
: I hope you are kidding. If not, I respectfully disagree. You can't
: possibly say that anything Petzold has written 'sucks'. At worst someone
: can say they didn't like it, but he's the man, been the man, continues to
be
: the man. What about Jeffrey Richter's solo .NET book? You can't say that
: sucks too? What about John Robbins Debugging Book? What about Mueller's
: Book? He couldn't write half of that deals with unsafe code.
:
:
: I may have given the impression that I think C# is better, nothing could
be
: further from the truth. But each language has its advantages, and I think
: partisans of either side have a little too much time on their hands.
:
: However, something tells me you were just goofing on me and I just made a
: jacka33 out of myself.
:
: Either way..I already cried uncle, I was wrong.
:
: :-) ''''And for penance, I will never, ever, ever get into a discussion
: that includes C# and VB.NET in the same paragraph.
: "Herfried K. Wagner [MVP]" <hi*******@m.activevb.de> wrote in message
: news:#U**************@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
: > Hello,
: >
: > "William Ryan" <do********@comcast.nospam.net> schrieb:
: > > Yeah, but Francesco did all of the coding.
: > >
: > > Petzold's book does not suck! The words Petzold and suck
: > > shouldn't even be allowed to be used in a sentence..not
: > > even like I just did ;-).
: >
: > If the book is not written in VB.NET, it _sucks_.
: >
: > SCNR
: >
: > --
: > Herfried K. Wagner
: > MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
: > http://www.mvps.org/dotnet
: >
: >
:
:
Nov 20 '05 #32

P: n/a
Hello,

"Tom Spink" <th**********@ntlworld.com> schrieb:
We all know that VB.NET is the best language ever.


I am not always sure if everybody here knows that.

;-)

--
Herfried K. Wagner
MVP · VB Classic, VB.NET
http://www.mvps.org/dotnet
Nov 20 '05 #33

P: n/a
On Sat, 20 Sep 2003 02:28:25 +0200, Mattias Sjögren <ma********************@mvps.org> wrote:

¤
¤ >But the last few months, its geting much more traffic.
¤
¤ While that might be true, I also feel that the signal-to-noise ratio
¤ has dropped here lately.
¤

Time for a Discussions group?
Paul ~~~ pc******@ameritech.net
Microsoft MVP (Visual Basic)
Nov 20 '05 #34

This discussion thread is closed

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