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where is the Key in TreeView.NET?


hi
i working with TreeView in VB6, and have good Properity Named (Key)
with the Key i can goto Any Node i know hes Key.

but in VB.NET i can find the Key :(
please tell me where i can find the key in TreeView.Net...
-----------------------------------------------
Best Regards From Tark
Nov 21 '05
77 14473
"smith" <rc********@smi thvoiceTAKEOUT. com> wrote in message
news:qo******** ********@newsre ad1.news.pas.ea rthlink.net...
Oh, obfuscation. Another huge, huge worry when you start out. But for
*most* VB developers who do corporate work it's not really a deal-breaker,
right?

However, if you aren't a corporate dev then just don't use the free
version of Dotfusctor that comes with VS.


My point exactly.... Something that no one ever had to worry about is now a
huge worry and will cost developers dearly (so much for about 60% of the
shareware market). No thanks. I like compiled code. Gave up P-Code quite a
few years ago.

--
Ken Halter - MS-MVP-VB - http://www.vbsight.com
Please keep all discussions in the groups..
Nov 21 '05 #21
:)

C++ makes the second-fastest code out there and MASM makes the fastest ever,
right?

Well, I can make VC++ on an HT box go slower than VB for DOS on a 286
because I don't have a lot of daily experience with VC++. :)

You're an MVP Ken, you know that a dev's experience with a specific task at
hand is usually what makes the biggest difference. And because of your
certified qualifications and experience I'm sure that you'll agree that a
VB5 person was faster up to speed with VB6 than a person whose very first
look at code was the VB6 IDE, and extrapolating on that I think you'll give
the nod to the idea that getting some *real* experience now with VB7 is a
great way to be floored by running the same code in just a few months using
the release version of VB8. I can't make blanket statements, but I can give
this example:
"When I ran this code in my environment with ADO.NET 1.1 and Visual Studio
2003, the execution time was about 30 minutes. With ADO.NET 2.0 and Visual
Studio 2005, I had an execution time of approximately 40-50 seconds!"
http://msdn.microsoft.com/data/defau...setenhance.asp
I wish it weren't true but I really have to get to work :). It's been a
great discussion and I thank you very much. (and thanks for taking a look at
my humble vb site, ther are a lot of "VBClassic" things there that I am
quite proud of)

Robert

"Ken Halter" <Ken_Halter@Use _Sparingly_Hotm ail.com> wrote in message
news:e$******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP09.phx.gbl...
"smith" <rc********@smi thvoiceTAKEOUT. com> wrote in message
news:6W******** *******@newsrea d1.news.pas.ear thlink.net...
Instant and complete porting of old code is a valid point ... as was
instant porting from QBasic to VB and VB3 to VB5/6.

I guess it's perception, as most things really are, Ken. And calling it
B# kinda implies that you've pretty much got your mind firmly set to a
position. I too had that position and I might even have had you beat in
my initial hatred of VB7 (http://www.smithvoice.com/adorumination.htm )


Well.. you've done a fairly good job of "prodding" VB6'ers over to B# but,
imo, that still doesn't mean B# is VB. Regardless. imo, B# is currently
about as useful as VB2 was (I'd say VB1 but there's already been a couple
of B# releases). As long as the framework is still running on top of the
OS (as Win3.1 still ran on top of DOS), it'll be dog slow and buggy. I
prefer to leave it to others to work with until it's mature. Let everyone
else deal with the "when I did this, the IDE crashed... but that was
expected" type problems. I have too much work (in VB6) to do. The company
I currently work for has zero interest in re-writting 20+ years worth of
code just so they can say that it't ".Net compatible". They just want
something that works. It doesn't matter one little bit if there's a ".Net"
in the name. We don't do database/web or any of the other types of apps
that .Net was designed for.

fwiw, I plan on using B# to learn my way around the framework. There's
very little evidence that anything "profession al" will ever be written in
B#. I can point you to dozens of component vendors that claim that their
components are "100% C# authored". Not one that I've found claims to be
"100% B# authored". B# is still as much of a "toy language" as VB was/is
as far as MS and everyone else is concerned.

btw... my reference to "B#" vs the various nicknames for "the flavor of
the month.Net" is not a put down to the language. There absolutely needs
to be a way to tell them apart. VB.Net, as people refer to it in some
groups, is already dead. There is no ".Net" in the name anymore. VB <> B#,
which means we need a way to tell them apart. VB2005 will soon be
released. It's just a matter of time before people start calling that VB5.
Just try searching for VB5 samples and you'll see a problem. Try entering
".Net" in any search engine. The results are worthless due to the .Net
domain names. B# syntax is closer to C# than it is to VB so B# is a great
name and one that we've suggested many times.

As long as people are complaining about B# benchmark results when compared
to VB6, and I have an OS that supports VB6, I'll be using VB6.

--
Ken Halter - MS-MVP-VB - http://www.vbsight.com
Please keep all discussions in the groups..

Nov 21 '05 #22
smith wrote:
Oh, obfuscation. Another huge, huge worry when you start out. But for
*most* VB developers who do corporate work it's not really a deal-breaker,
right?

Amazing how easily the faulty assumptions creep in...

I'd estimate more than half the people who read that will think
that you are asserting that "most VB developers" do/did "corporate work"
And many of those readers will just accept it without evidence.

Eventually it becomes "everybody knows that..."


Bob
--
Nov 21 '05 #23
smith wrote:
Oh, obfuscation. Another huge, huge worry when you start out. But for
*most* VB developers who do corporate work it's not really a deal-breaker,
right?

Amazing how easily the faulty assumptions creep in...

I'd estimate more than half the people who read that will think
that you are asserting that "most VB developers" do/did "corporate work"
And many of those readers will just accept it without evidence.

Eventually it becomes "everybody knows that..."


Bob
--
Nov 21 '05 #24
Show me the numbers, Bob. ;-)

"Bob O`Bob" <fi*******@yaho ogroups.com> wrote in message
news:ez******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP09.phx.gbl...
smith wrote:
Oh, obfuscation. Another huge, huge worry when you start out. But for
*most* VB developers who do corporate work it's not really a
deal-breaker, right?

Amazing how easily the faulty assumptions creep in...

I'd estimate more than half the people who read that will think
that you are asserting that "most VB developers" do/did "corporate work"
And many of those readers will just accept it without evidence.

Eventually it becomes "everybody knows that..."


Bob
--

Nov 21 '05 #25
Show me the numbers, Bob. ;-)

"Bob O`Bob" <fi*******@yaho ogroups.com> wrote in message
news:ez******** ******@TK2MSFTN GP09.phx.gbl...
smith wrote:
Oh, obfuscation. Another huge, huge worry when you start out. But for
*most* VB developers who do corporate work it's not really a
deal-breaker, right?

Amazing how easily the faulty assumptions creep in...

I'd estimate more than half the people who read that will think
that you are asserting that "most VB developers" do/did "corporate work"
And many of those readers will just accept it without evidence.

Eventually it becomes "everybody knows that..."


Bob
--

Nov 21 '05 #26
You're the one that made the assertion. Back it up, bub! ;-)

Bryan
_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________
New Vision Software "When the going gets weird,"
Bryan Stafford "the weird turn pro."
al************* *****@mvps.org Hunter S. Thompson -
Microsoft MVP-Visual Basic Fear and Loathing in LasVegas
On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 20:18:15 GMT, "smith"
<rc********@smi thvoiceTAKEOUT. com> wrote:
Show me the numbers, Bob. ;-)

"Bob O`Bob" <fi*******@yaho ogroups.com> wrote in message
news:ez******* *******@TK2MSFT NGP09.phx.gbl.. .
smith wrote:
Oh, obfuscation. Another huge, huge worry when you start out. But for
*most* VB developers who do corporate work it's not really a
deal-breaker, right?

Amazing how easily the faulty assumptions creep in...

I'd estimate more than half the people who read that will think
that you are asserting that "most VB developers" do/did "corporate work"
And many of those readers will just accept it without evidence.

Eventually it becomes "everybody knows that..."


Bob
--


Nov 21 '05 #27
You're the one that made the assertion. Back it up, bub! ;-)

Bryan
_______________ _______________ _______________ _______________
New Vision Software "When the going gets weird,"
Bryan Stafford "the weird turn pro."
al************* *****@mvps.org Hunter S. Thompson -
Microsoft MVP-Visual Basic Fear and Loathing in LasVegas
On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 20:18:15 GMT, "smith"
<rc********@smi thvoiceTAKEOUT. com> wrote:
Show me the numbers, Bob. ;-)

"Bob O`Bob" <fi*******@yaho ogroups.com> wrote in message
news:ez******* *******@TK2MSFT NGP09.phx.gbl.. .
smith wrote:
Oh, obfuscation. Another huge, huge worry when you start out. But for
*most* VB developers who do corporate work it's not really a
deal-breaker, right?

Amazing how easily the faulty assumptions creep in...

I'd estimate more than half the people who read that will think
that you are asserting that "most VB developers" do/did "corporate work"
And many of those readers will just accept it without evidence.

Eventually it becomes "everybody knows that..."


Bob
--


Nov 21 '05 #28
As a long time (I got VB 1 at MS show in Long Beach) VB developer I have to
say that the transition is mostly painless. I got a good book and installed
VS 2003. Within a day I was up and running. Some of the VB6 projects would
not fully upgrade to VB.NET but the info in the upgrade output gave me most
of what was required.

Things that I had trouble with :
New methods for layout. Adding new controls after a form was "complete"
was often an exercise in futility. Getting things to look right took a
procedure (manual) to get things right. Once you get the dock and anchor
then you loose much of that wonderful code used for form resize. There are
new controls for this in VB.Net 2005 so it is easier.

In VS2003 you don't have edit and continue. You can set the IDE to
allow edits but they don't take effect until you rebuild. This is another
thing fixed (at least in VB Express).

Not really trouble but exactly what the poster is talking about. We had
lots of code for filling treeviews with nodes with a key. This allow the
easy code navigation in the treeview. That and control arrays which after
using VB.NET for a year are totally out of my way of thinking right now.

Now as a big plus the DOT.NET framework provides many classes which we had
to create ourselves in VB6. This provides a cleaner interface to windows
thru managed code so less runtime errors.

And speaking of errors, as a C++ programmer as well it is good to see VB.NET
take the "try ... catch ..." error approach. This is much easier to deal
with than what was in VB6.

Just a few thoughts. I have not yet seen any reason to stay with VB6 or non
managed code. Everything including data access is faster. And I even
created an ASP.NET ecommerce site. This would have been way out of my
league using the tolls available prior to DOT.NET.

Lloyd Sheen


"smith" <rc********@smi thvoiceTAKEOUT. com> wrote in message
news:qo******** ********@newsre ad1.news.pas.ea rthlink.net...
Oh, obfuscation. Another huge, huge worry when you start out. But for
*most* VB developers who do corporate work it's not really a deal-breaker,
right?

However, if you aren't a corporate dev then just don't use the free
version of Dotfusctor that comes with VS.

If you truly need obfuscation ... truly, as in you are a for-retail dev,
then go to the Standard Edition (I use that version myself when my
projects go outside a corporate environment) or to the Professional
Edition. Or use any of the other obfuscators that are out there, or even
go to Thinstall (that is a cool tool: www.thinstall.com )

Yes, they cost money but if you make money from your work then you can
claim the investment in your taxes and having the proper tools is the cost
of doing business in any business.

Look to the "real" vendors to see how they obfuscate (such as ComponentOne
of Infragistics or even the good little guy Rebex www.rebex.net. Just get
one of their controls and run it through Reflector from
http://www.aisto.com/roeder/dotnet/ and see how much code a bad person can
really steal from these reputable companies )

All the best, again :)

Robert Smith
Kirkland, WA
www.smithvoice.com

Nov 21 '05 #29
As a long time (I got VB 1 at MS show in Long Beach) VB developer I have to
say that the transition is mostly painless. I got a good book and installed
VS 2003. Within a day I was up and running. Some of the VB6 projects would
not fully upgrade to VB.NET but the info in the upgrade output gave me most
of what was required.

Things that I had trouble with :
New methods for layout. Adding new controls after a form was "complete"
was often an exercise in futility. Getting things to look right took a
procedure (manual) to get things right. Once you get the dock and anchor
then you loose much of that wonderful code used for form resize. There are
new controls for this in VB.Net 2005 so it is easier.

In VS2003 you don't have edit and continue. You can set the IDE to
allow edits but they don't take effect until you rebuild. This is another
thing fixed (at least in VB Express).

Not really trouble but exactly what the poster is talking about. We had
lots of code for filling treeviews with nodes with a key. This allow the
easy code navigation in the treeview. That and control arrays which after
using VB.NET for a year are totally out of my way of thinking right now.

Now as a big plus the DOT.NET framework provides many classes which we had
to create ourselves in VB6. This provides a cleaner interface to windows
thru managed code so less runtime errors.

And speaking of errors, as a C++ programmer as well it is good to see VB.NET
take the "try ... catch ..." error approach. This is much easier to deal
with than what was in VB6.

Just a few thoughts. I have not yet seen any reason to stay with VB6 or non
managed code. Everything including data access is faster. And I even
created an ASP.NET ecommerce site. This would have been way out of my
league using the tolls available prior to DOT.NET.

Lloyd Sheen


"smith" <rc********@smi thvoiceTAKEOUT. com> wrote in message
news:qo******** ********@newsre ad1.news.pas.ea rthlink.net...
Oh, obfuscation. Another huge, huge worry when you start out. But for
*most* VB developers who do corporate work it's not really a deal-breaker,
right?

However, if you aren't a corporate dev then just don't use the free
version of Dotfusctor that comes with VS.

If you truly need obfuscation ... truly, as in you are a for-retail dev,
then go to the Standard Edition (I use that version myself when my
projects go outside a corporate environment) or to the Professional
Edition. Or use any of the other obfuscators that are out there, or even
go to Thinstall (that is a cool tool: www.thinstall.com )

Yes, they cost money but if you make money from your work then you can
claim the investment in your taxes and having the proper tools is the cost
of doing business in any business.

Look to the "real" vendors to see how they obfuscate (such as ComponentOne
of Infragistics or even the good little guy Rebex www.rebex.net. Just get
one of their controls and run it through Reflector from
http://www.aisto.com/roeder/dotnet/ and see how much code a bad person can
really steal from these reputable companies )

All the best, again :)

Robert Smith
Kirkland, WA
www.smithvoice.com

Nov 21 '05 #30

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