473,854 Members | 1,428 Online
Bytes | Software Development & Data Engineering Community
+ Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

DCOM, COM+, COM, MTS; what are they?

I don't know where is the right place to ask this so I will start here.

Can someone explain to me what these represent? I think they all have to do
with the middleware level, but I really don't understand what a DCOM Server
is or a Microsoft Transaction Server, etc. I have no idea....
Kyle
Nov 21 '05 #1
13 5466
Go to http://www.microsoft.com/ and search for COM, DCOM, MTS ...

Happy reading.
Willy.
"Kyle Adams" <kyle.adams@boi ntonyel_spammer sbeware_.info> wrote in message
news:41******** *************** @news.twtelecom .net...
I don't know where is the right place to ask this so I will start here.

Can someone explain to me what these represent? I think they all have to
do
with the middleware level, but I really don't understand what a DCOM
Server
is or a Microsoft Transaction Server, etc. I have no idea....
Kyle

Nov 21 '05 #2
Kyle,

It's a lot of acronyms to get right. Here is a breakdown of what they
are:

COM - Short for Component Object Model. It is an interface-based component
model which allowed different languages to produce code that would be able
to interact easily with other languages. It also was a first attempt at
component-based design (because of the emphasis on interfaces).

MTS - Short for Microsoft Transaction Server. This was introduced in Option
Pack 4 for NT and used the fact that COM is an interface-based model to
provide aspects to code (such as transactioning) . MTS was the transaction
coordinator.

DCOM - Short for Distributed COM. It used the fact that everything was
interface based to provide proxies which would allow for communication
between threading apartments.

COM+ - Well, COM+. It took things like DCOM, MTS, and all of the other
aspects provided by the OS to COM components, and wrapped them up into this
package. Things such as queued components, transactions, object pooling,
JITA, etc, etc are all exposed through this. All of these services are
exposed through the ServicedCompone nt class in .NET

Hope this helps.
--
- Nicholas Paldino [.NET/C# MVP]
- mv*@spam.guard. caspershouse.co m

"Kyle Adams" <kyle.adams@boi ntonyel_spammer sbeware_.info> wrote in message
news:41******** *************** @news.twtelecom .net...
I don't know where is the right place to ask this so I will start here.

Can someone explain to me what these represent? I think they all have to do with the middleware level, but I really don't understand what a DCOM Server is or a Microsoft Transaction Server, etc. I have no idea....
Kyle

Nov 21 '05 #3

COM
An acronym for Component Object Model, the name of Microsoft's design
strategy to implement OLE 2+ and ActiveX. Distributed COM (DCOM) allows
networked and cross-platform implementation of ActiveX and OLE 2+ operations
and Automation.

DCOM
An acronym for Distributed Common Object Model that allows communication and
manipulation of objects over a network connection. Windows NT 4.0 was the
first Microsoft operating system to support DCOM (formerly called
NetworkOLE).

COM+
COM+ isan extension to Microsoft's Component Object Model (COM). COM+ builds
on COM's integrated services and features, making it easier for developers
to create and use software components in any language, using any tool.
Delivered on the Microsoft Windows platform, COM+ is designed to preserve
and extend current investments in COM. Applications currently using COM
technology will work in the COM+ environment.

MTS
Microsoft Transaction Server. A part of Windows NT server providing
transaction support for COM components over a distributed network.

--

OHM ( Terry Burns )
. . . One-Handed-Man . . .

Time flies when you don't know what you're doing

"Kyle Adams" <kyle.adams@boi ntonyel_spammer sbeware_.info> wrote in message
news:41******** *************** @news.twtelecom .net...
I don't know where is the right place to ask this so I will start here.

Can someone explain to me what these represent? I think they all have to do with the middleware level, but I really don't understand what a DCOM Server is or a Microsoft Transaction Server, etc. I have no idea....
Kyle

Nov 21 '05 #4
Thanks folks. I should have added MSMQ because I think it is related.

But here's the next question (at least about COM/DCOM/COM+). If I write
objects in the dot net framework language of my choice, what then? Let's
say I make a dll that handles invoicing on our accounting system. The smart
approach in a big environment is to put that in the middle layer, right? So
my backend is SQL S, front end is web or windows forms, and middle layer is
what? What do I choose? Do I use one of these 3?

Is that how you implement (D)COM(+)? Do you make DLLS and put them on a
middle-ware server or am I totally missing it? That is, is the middle layer
COM/DCOM/COM+ just a memory and processing space where compiled dlls live?

And how does web services come into play here? Is web services an attempt
to kill the middle layer or is it the next step in the progression?

thanks for the great responses


One Handed Man ( OHM - Terry Burns ) wrote:
COM
An acronym for Component Object Model, the name of Microsoft's design
strategy to implement OLE 2+ and ActiveX. Distributed COM (DCOM)
allows networked and cross-platform implementation of ActiveX and OLE
2+ operations and Automation.

DCOM
An acronym for Distributed Common Object Model that allows
communication and manipulation of objects over a network connection.
Windows NT 4.0 was the first Microsoft operating system to support
DCOM (formerly called NetworkOLE).

COM+
COM+ isan extension to Microsoft's Component Object Model (COM). COM+
builds on COM's integrated services and features, making it easier
for developers to create and use software components in any language,
using any tool. Delivered on the Microsoft Windows platform, COM+ is
designed to preserve and extend current investments in COM.
Applications currently using COM technology will work in the COM+
environment.

MTS
Microsoft Transaction Server. A part of Windows NT server providing
transaction support for COM components over a distributed network.
"Kyle Adams" <kyle.adams@boi ntonyel_spammer sbeware_.info> wrote in
message news:41******** *************** @news.twtelecom .net...
I don't know where is the right place to ask this so I will start
here.

Can someone explain to me what these represent? I think they all
have to do with the middleware level, but I really don't understand
what a DCOM Server is or a Microsoft Transaction Server, etc. I
have no idea....
Kyle

Nov 21 '05 #5
With all due respect, much of this is just plain wrong.

See inline:
2) COM, DCOM, MTS etc... are quite passe {that's a good thing because I
don't care what anybody on the newsgroup says DCOM security was a flippin
nightmare!!!}. Anyway, ".NET Remoting" is the replacement for DCOM and it's very nice :).
.NET remoting is NOT the replacement for COM+ or DCOM. Remoting is
missing authentication, authorization, and all of the other aspects that
COM+ provides. Also, MS has publically stated that remoting is not going to
be improved upon anymore, rather, Indigo will be pushed as the new
communication/aspect providing mechanism.

Furthermore, MS has publically stated that currently, Enterprise
Services (ES, or COM+ in .NET) is the recommended technology of choice today
to provide the easiest migration experience to Indigo.
Also as other posters have pointed out the cool features of
COM+ are mostly built in to classes in the .NET framework so no need to pull your hair out trying to learn how to build & deploy MTS packages or any of
that older stuff; learn the framework - be the framework...
The idea of COM+ is that you don't have to manage these things
programatticall y. COM+ allows for easy changes of the aspects it provides
through configuration, not through recompiles of code.
Oh yeah, one other teeny tiny little thing:

3) Depending on how close you live to Redmond WA the incredibly loud noise
you hear is a HUGE train coming down the tracks at you. The train's name is "SOA": Service Oriented Architecture. XML Web Services and SOA; live them, learn them, love them...
Remoting provides nothing in terms of migration towards a SOA. Indigo
is meant to be the technology of choice for SOA. As stated before, ES is
the preferred technology of choice when it comes to easy migration to
Indigo.

Don Box even said as much. Check out Tim Sneath's weblog (he works for
MS):

http://blogs.msdn.com/tims/archive/2.../24/79054.aspx

In the third paragraph he states:

Don Box even recommended (in his PDC WSV201 talk) combining ASP.NET Web
Services with Enterprise Services today for the easiest migration, which is
interesting.

So basically, use ES, and if you have to expose for SOA, layer your WS
(use WS extensions) on top of ES.

--
- Nicholas Paldino [.NET/C# MVP]
- mv*@spam.guard. caspershouse.co m

--Richard
"Kyle Adams" wrote:
Thanks folks. I should have added MSMQ because I think it is related.

But here's the next question (at least about COM/DCOM/COM+). If I write
objects in the dot net framework language of my choice, what then? Let's say I make a dll that handles invoicing on our accounting system. The smart approach in a big environment is to put that in the middle layer, right? So my backend is SQL S, front end is web or windows forms, and middle layer is what? What do I choose? Do I use one of these 3?

Is that how you implement (D)COM(+)? Do you make DLLS and put them on a middle-ware server or am I totally missing it? That is, is the middle layer COM/DCOM/COM+ just a memory and processing space where compiled dlls live?
And how does web services come into play here? Is web services an attempt to kill the middle layer or is it the next step in the progression?

thanks for the great responses


One Handed Man ( OHM - Terry Burns ) wrote:
COM
An acronym for Component Object Model, the name of Microsoft's design
strategy to implement OLE 2+ and ActiveX. Distributed COM (DCOM)
allows networked and cross-platform implementation of ActiveX and OLE
2+ operations and Automation.

DCOM
An acronym for Distributed Common Object Model that allows
communication and manipulation of objects over a network connection.
Windows NT 4.0 was the first Microsoft operating system to support
DCOM (formerly called NetworkOLE).

COM+
COM+ isan extension to Microsoft's Component Object Model (COM). COM+
builds on COM's integrated services and features, making it easier
for developers to create and use software components in any language,
using any tool. Delivered on the Microsoft Windows platform, COM+ is
designed to preserve and extend current investments in COM.
Applications currently using COM technology will work in the COM+
environment.

MTS
Microsoft Transaction Server. A part of Windows NT server providing
transaction support for COM components over a distributed network.
"Kyle Adams" <kyle.adams@boi ntonyel_spammer sbeware_.info> wrote in
message news:41******** *************** @news.twtelecom .net...
> I don't know where is the right place to ask this so I will start
> here.
>
> Can someone explain to me what these represent? I think they all
> have to do with the middleware level, but I really don't understand
> what a DCOM Server is or a Microsoft Transaction Server, etc. I
> have no idea....
>
>
> Kyle


Nov 21 '05 #6
As Nicolas stated in his reply, some of your reflections are plain wrong, I
would add the following:
1. MS never stated that C# is the 'now language'.
2. DCOM and COM aren't quite passé, f.i DCOM will be one of the possible
wire level protocols available with Indigo.
COM (and DCOM) has become part of all currently available Windows OS (and
the upcoming Longhorn), and it's the only viable technology available
for native clients to use .NET components/services. So we can safely say
that COM's (and COM based technologies) life cycle is tied to Windows OS
(or better Win32/Win64) life cycle.
3. DCOM and COM are the base components used by COM+, and COM+ is the
core of .NET's EnterpriseServi ces
The "cool features are" COM+ features (native code services) the FCL ES
classes are simple wrappers around COM+, using COM and DCOM to cross the
native/managed border.
4. SOA is not a component technology, it's a service technology. The
services offered can use any component technology based on the end-point OS
available platform services (Java, Corba, .NET, COM+ ....).

Willy.
"Richard" <Ri*****@discus sions.microsoft .com> wrote in message
news:B3******** *************** ***********@mic rosoft.com...

1) Microsoft has clearly stated that C# is the 'now language'. I'd
recommend learning C# if that's what you're asking in your "language of my
choice - what then" question...

2) COM, DCOM, MTS etc... are quite passe {that's a good thing because I
don't care what anybody on the newsgroup says DCOM security was a flippin
nightmare!!!}. Anyway, ".NET Remoting" is the replacement for DCOM and
it's
very nice :). Also as other posters have pointed out the cool features of
COM+ are mostly built in to classes in the .NET framework so no need to
pull
your hair out trying to learn how to build & deploy MTS packages or any of
that older stuff; learn the framework - be the framework...

Oh yeah, one other teeny tiny little thing:

3) Depending on how close you live to Redmond WA the incredibly loud noise
you hear is a HUGE train coming down the tracks at you. The train's name
is
"SOA": Service Oriented Architecture. XML Web Services and SOA; live
them,
learn them, love them...

--Richard
"Kyle Adams" wrote:
Thanks folks. I should have added MSMQ because I think it is related.

But here's the next question (at least about COM/DCOM/COM+). If I write
objects in the dot net framework language of my choice, what then? Let's
say I make a dll that handles invoicing on our accounting system. The
smart
approach in a big environment is to put that in the middle layer, right?
So
my backend is SQL S, front end is web or windows forms, and middle layer
is
what? What do I choose? Do I use one of these 3?

Is that how you implement (D)COM(+)? Do you make DLLS and put them on a
middle-ware server or am I totally missing it? That is, is the middle
layer
COM/DCOM/COM+ just a memory and processing space where compiled dlls
live?

And how does web services come into play here? Is web services an
attempt
to kill the middle layer or is it the next step in the progression?

thanks for the great responses


One Handed Man ( OHM - Terry Burns ) wrote:
> COM
> An acronym for Component Object Model, the name of Microsoft's design
> strategy to implement OLE 2+ and ActiveX. Distributed COM (DCOM)
> allows networked and cross-platform implementation of ActiveX and OLE
> 2+ operations and Automation.
>
> DCOM
> An acronym for Distributed Common Object Model that allows
> communication and manipulation of objects over a network connection.
> Windows NT 4.0 was the first Microsoft operating system to support
> DCOM (formerly called NetworkOLE).
>
> COM+
> COM+ isan extension to Microsoft's Component Object Model (COM). COM+
> builds on COM's integrated services and features, making it easier
> for developers to create and use software components in any language,
> using any tool. Delivered on the Microsoft Windows platform, COM+ is
> designed to preserve and extend current investments in COM.
> Applications currently using COM technology will work in the COM+
> environment.
>
> MTS
> Microsoft Transaction Server. A part of Windows NT server providing
> transaction support for COM components over a distributed network.
>
>
> "Kyle Adams" <kyle.adams@boi ntonyel_spammer sbeware_.info> wrote in
> message news:41******** *************** @news.twtelecom .net...
>> I don't know where is the right place to ask this so I will start
>> here.
>>
>> Can someone explain to me what these represent? I think they all
>> have to do with the middleware level, but I really don't understand
>> what a DCOM Server is or a Microsoft Transaction Server, etc. I
>> have no idea....
>>
>>
>> Kyle


Nov 21 '05 #7
Well Said.

"Nicholas Paldino [.NET/C# MVP]" wrote:
With all due respect, much of this is just plain wrong.

See inline:
2) COM, DCOM, MTS etc... are quite passe {that's a good thing because I
don't care what anybody on the newsgroup says DCOM security was a flippin
nightmare!!!}. Anyway, ".NET Remoting" is the replacement for DCOM and

it's
very nice :).


.NET remoting is NOT the replacement for COM+ or DCOM. Remoting is
missing authentication, authorization, and all of the other aspects that
COM+ provides. Also, MS has publically stated that remoting is not going to
be improved upon anymore, rather, Indigo will be pushed as the new
communication/aspect providing mechanism.

Furthermore, MS has publically stated that currently, Enterprise
Services (ES, or COM+ in .NET) is the recommended technology of choice today
to provide the easiest migration experience to Indigo.
Also as other posters have pointed out the cool features of
COM+ are mostly built in to classes in the .NET framework so no need to

pull
your hair out trying to learn how to build & deploy MTS packages or any of
that older stuff; learn the framework - be the framework...


The idea of COM+ is that you don't have to manage these things
programatticall y. COM+ allows for easy changes of the aspects it provides
through configuration, not through recompiles of code.
Oh yeah, one other teeny tiny little thing:

3) Depending on how close you live to Redmond WA the incredibly loud noise
you hear is a HUGE train coming down the tracks at you. The train's name

is
"SOA": Service Oriented Architecture. XML Web Services and SOA; live

them,
learn them, love them...


Remoting provides nothing in terms of migration towards a SOA. Indigo
is meant to be the technology of choice for SOA. As stated before, ES is
the preferred technology of choice when it comes to easy migration to
Indigo.

Don Box even said as much. Check out Tim Sneath's weblog (he works for
MS):

http://blogs.msdn.com/tims/archive/2.../24/79054.aspx

In the third paragraph he states:

Don Box even recommended (in his PDC WSV201 talk) combining ASP.NET Web
Services with Enterprise Services today for the easiest migration, which is
interesting.

So basically, use ES, and if you have to expose for SOA, layer your WS
(use WS extensions) on top of ES.

--
- Nicholas Paldino [.NET/C# MVP]
- mv*@spam.guard. caspershouse.co m

--Richard
"Kyle Adams" wrote:
Thanks folks. I should have added MSMQ because I think it is related.

But here's the next question (at least about COM/DCOM/COM+). If I write
objects in the dot net framework language of my choice, what then? Let's say I make a dll that handles invoicing on our accounting system. The smart approach in a big environment is to put that in the middle layer, right? So my backend is SQL S, front end is web or windows forms, and middle layer is what? What do I choose? Do I use one of these 3?

Is that how you implement (D)COM(+)? Do you make DLLS and put them on a middle-ware server or am I totally missing it? That is, is the middle layer COM/DCOM/COM+ just a memory and processing space where compiled dlls live?
And how does web services come into play here? Is web services an attempt to kill the middle layer or is it the next step in the progression?

thanks for the great responses


One Handed Man ( OHM - Terry Burns ) wrote:
> COM
> An acronym for Component Object Model, the name of Microsoft's design
> strategy to implement OLE 2+ and ActiveX. Distributed COM (DCOM)
> allows networked and cross-platform implementation of ActiveX and OLE
> 2+ operations and Automation.
>
> DCOM
> An acronym for Distributed Common Object Model that allows
> communication and manipulation of objects over a network connection.
> Windows NT 4.0 was the first Microsoft operating system to support
> DCOM (formerly called NetworkOLE).
>
> COM+
> COM+ isan extension to Microsoft's Component Object Model (COM). COM+
> builds on COM's integrated services and features, making it easier
> for developers to create and use software components in any language,
> using any tool. Delivered on the Microsoft Windows platform, COM+ is
> designed to preserve and extend current investments in COM.
> Applications currently using COM technology will work in the COM+
> environment.
>
> MTS
> Microsoft Transaction Server. A part of Windows NT server providing
> transaction support for COM components over a distributed network.
>
>
> "Kyle Adams" <kyle.adams@boi ntonyel_spammer sbeware_.info> wrote in
> message news:41******** *************** @news.twtelecom .net...
>> I don't know where is the right place to ask this so I will start
>> here.
>>
>> Can someone explain to me what these represent? I think they all
>> have to do with the middleware level, but I really don't understand
>> what a DCOM Server is or a Microsoft Transaction Server, etc. I
>> have no idea....
>>
>>
>> Kyle


Nov 21 '05 #8
Well said.

"Willy Denoyette [MVP]" wrote:
As Nicolas stated in his reply, some of your reflections are plain wrong, I
would add the following:
1. MS never stated that C# is the 'now language'.
2. DCOM and COM aren't quite passé, f.i DCOM will be one of the possible
wire level protocols available with Indigo.
COM (and DCOM) has become part of all currently available Windows OS (and
the upcoming Longhorn), and it's the only viable technology available
for native clients to use .NET components/services. So we can safely say
that COM's (and COM based technologies) life cycle is tied to Windows OS
(or better Win32/Win64) life cycle.
3. DCOM and COM are the base components used by COM+, and COM+ is the
core of .NET's EnterpriseServi ces
The "cool features are" COM+ features (native code services) the FCL ES
classes are simple wrappers around COM+, using COM and DCOM to cross the
native/managed border.
4. SOA is not a component technology, it's a service technology. The
services offered can use any component technology based on the end-point OS
available platform services (Java, Corba, .NET, COM+ ....).

Willy.
"Richard" <Ri*****@discus sions.microsoft .com> wrote in message
news:B3******** *************** ***********@mic rosoft.com...

1) Microsoft has clearly stated that C# is the 'now language'. I'd
recommend learning C# if that's what you're asking in your "language of my
choice - what then" question...

2) COM, DCOM, MTS etc... are quite passe {that's a good thing because I
don't care what anybody on the newsgroup says DCOM security was a flippin
nightmare!!!}. Anyway, ".NET Remoting" is the replacement for DCOM and
it's
very nice :). Also as other posters have pointed out the cool features of
COM+ are mostly built in to classes in the .NET framework so no need to
pull
your hair out trying to learn how to build & deploy MTS packages or any of
that older stuff; learn the framework - be the framework...

Oh yeah, one other teeny tiny little thing:

3) Depending on how close you live to Redmond WA the incredibly loud noise
you hear is a HUGE train coming down the tracks at you. The train's name
is
"SOA": Service Oriented Architecture. XML Web Services and SOA; live
them,
learn them, love them...

--Richard
"Kyle Adams" wrote:
Thanks folks. I should have added MSMQ because I think it is related.

But here's the next question (at least about COM/DCOM/COM+). If I write
objects in the dot net framework language of my choice, what then? Let's
say I make a dll that handles invoicing on our accounting system. The
smart
approach in a big environment is to put that in the middle layer, right?
So
my backend is SQL S, front end is web or windows forms, and middle layer
is
what? What do I choose? Do I use one of these 3?

Is that how you implement (D)COM(+)? Do you make DLLS and put them on a
middle-ware server or am I totally missing it? That is, is the middle
layer
COM/DCOM/COM+ just a memory and processing space where compiled dlls
live?

And how does web services come into play here? Is web services an
attempt
to kill the middle layer or is it the next step in the progression?

thanks for the great responses


One Handed Man ( OHM - Terry Burns ) wrote:
> COM
> An acronym for Component Object Model, the name of Microsoft's design
> strategy to implement OLE 2+ and ActiveX. Distributed COM (DCOM)
> allows networked and cross-platform implementation of ActiveX and OLE
> 2+ operations and Automation.
>
> DCOM
> An acronym for Distributed Common Object Model that allows
> communication and manipulation of objects over a network connection.
> Windows NT 4.0 was the first Microsoft operating system to support
> DCOM (formerly called NetworkOLE).
>
> COM+
> COM+ isan extension to Microsoft's Component Object Model (COM). COM+
> builds on COM's integrated services and features, making it easier
> for developers to create and use software components in any language,
> using any tool. Delivered on the Microsoft Windows platform, COM+ is
> designed to preserve and extend current investments in COM.
> Applications currently using COM technology will work in the COM+
> environment.
>
> MTS
> Microsoft Transaction Server. A part of Windows NT server providing
> transaction support for COM components over a distributed network.
>
>
> "Kyle Adams" <kyle.adams@boi ntonyel_spammer sbeware_.info> wrote in
> message news:41******** *************** @news.twtelecom .net...
>> I don't know where is the right place to ask this so I will start
>> here.
>>
>> Can someone explain to me what these represent? I think they all
>> have to do with the middleware level, but I really don't understand
>> what a DCOM Server is or a Microsoft Transaction Server, etc. I
>> have no idea....
>>
>>
>> Kyle


Nov 21 '05 #9
.NET remoting is NOT the replacement for COM+ or DCOM. Remoting is
missing authentication, authorization, and all of the other aspects that
COM+ provides.
Remoting also doesn't give you remote activation... On the other hand
Remoting is not RPC based and you don't need IIS running to use it...

But you are very correct on my bad choice of the word "replacemen t" - I went
back and re-read my post and I even disagree with it the way I wrote it...
COM+ & DCOM aren't going anywhere for very long time but they aren't the
"state of the art" anymore - I think that was more what I was trying to say.

When I read the original poster's question I interpreted it as someone
asking about doing new development today -- and with the new stuff in .NET
why on earth would you bother with something like DCOM?

Where I work now everything is COM+ and it works fine - we're not going to
get rid of it - but all of our new development efforts are moving in the
SOA/ES/Indigo direction; not COM+, MTS, and DCOM...
Also, MS has publically stated that remoting is not going to
be improved upon anymore, rather, Indigo will be pushed as the new
communication/aspect providing mechanism.

You are HUGELY correct that Indigo is going to take over. But as far as not
improving Remoting, let's face it, it's hard to "improve" on a config file
entry and 3 lines of code that gives you distributed objects... :)
Furthermore, MS has publically stated that currently, Enterprise
Services (ES, or COM+ in .NET) is the recommended technology of choice today
to provide the easiest migration experience to Indigo.

Yes, but the COM+ statements apply more for existing code - yes? You can
still build an MFC application if you want to, would you?
Remoting provides nothing in terms of migration towards a SOA. Indigo
is meant to be the technology of choice for SOA. As stated before, ES is
the preferred technology of choice when it comes to easy migration to
Indigo.

I hope I didn't suggest that Remoting had anything to do with migrating to
SOA. Remoting & SOA solve different problems...
So basically, use ES, and if you have to expose for SOA, layer your WS
(use WS extensions) on top of ES.


EXACTLY --> Use ES & SOA; not MTS and DCOM...
Nov 21 '05 #10

This thread has been closed and replies have been disabled. Please start a new discussion.

Similar topics

1
15292
by: Prashanth Uppunda | last post by:
Hello, Does anybody have an idea on how to instantiate a DCOM server residing in another machine using C#? Thanks Prashanth
4
11593
by: Gerhard Pretorius | last post by:
ON Win 2003 IIS6, Since yesterday, (12 Aug 2003) for some strange reason, (after installing WindowsServer2003-KB823980-x86-ENU.exe) I cannot pass the Request object to to VB COM DLL. I have a funciton inVB DLL Function BuildSqlWhereFromHTML(ByRef AspReq As ASPTypeLibrary.Request, _ ByRef AspSes As ASPTypeLibrary.Session) As String
8
2316
by: Paul van't Klooster | last post by:
Hi, I have a situation where I need to register a COM/COM+ object that I have written in C# as DCOM. I have no problems creating COM or COM+ classes using C#, but I have not been successful in trying to create a class that is accessible through DCOM. Is anyone able to help me with this one.
3
2043
by: Alex | last post by:
I'm having a problem porting an ASP solution to ASPX. In the ASP solution I'm accessing a DCOM server, create sub DCOM objects and call functions from VB script on the ASP pages. The DCOM object handles are stored in session variables. This works fine without a problem. Ported it to ASPX, accessing the same DCOM server from code behind pages. Still, usually no problems. However sometimes I'm seeing an error stating that the DCOM handle...
2
2323
by: c.verma | last post by:
I have a web based (forms based authentication) asp.net application that uses .NET remoting. It has web.config.remoting with all the required settings in it. As soon as it tries to access the website, it threw an error: Access denied attempting to launch a DCOM Server. The server is: {000C101C-0000-0000-C000-00000­0000046} The user is ASPNET/ServerName, SID=S-1-5-21-1606980848-602162­358-1801674531-1007.
1
3212
by: Stuart Dee | last post by:
Hi, How do i create a dcom or com+ component with visual basic dot net. Ive actually created it but the article tells me to register tlb and insert into gac How do I put it into MTS as a dcom component Any good articles Tia
5
1532
by: Dav | last post by:
>From what I know you can use com+ in asp.net via interop. If I convert these com+ objects to .NET (VB.NET) do I still need MTS or does the ..NET framework handle the object pooling and other features of MTS? So, instead of a bunch of COM+ objects on MTS that my asp.net can reference, can I convert them to .NET DLLs and just keep them in the bin folder? Basically, if I convert my COM+ objects to .NET do I need MTS for a high traffic...
2
3237
by: g | last post by:
we are evaluating CRM packages and are looking for information on the differences/simliarities, pros and cons of these architectures used by various CRM Vendors. We have been searching for more information online and have not really found any comparisons. Client Server ..NET ASP
2
3443
by: =?Utf-8?B?Q2hyaXN0aWFuIEhhdmVs?= | last post by:
Hi, in a existing application (DCOM server and client, both in VC++) we have very often problems with the DCOM-configuration. Is the requiered configuration (open ports) in applications using .NET remoting much more easier than in DCOM applications? What is with the performance, if the DCOM server has a .NET remoting object client and the DCOM client (VC++) uses the .NET remoting object as the server?
0
11024
Oralloy
by: Oralloy | last post by:
Hello folks, I am unable to find appropriate documentation on the type promotion of bit-fields when using the generalised comparison operator "<=>". The problem is that using the GNU compilers, it seems that the internal comparison operator "<=>" tries to promote arguments from unsigned to signed. This is as boiled down as I can make it. Here is my compilation command: g++-12 -std=c++20 -Wnarrowing bit_field.cpp Here is the code in...
0
10679
jinu1996
by: jinu1996 | last post by:
In today's digital age, having a compelling online presence is paramount for businesses aiming to thrive in a competitive landscape. At the heart of this digital strategy lies an intricately woven tapestry of website design and digital marketing. It's not merely about having a website; it's about crafting an immersive digital experience that captivates audiences and drives business growth. The Art of Business Website Design Your website is...
1
10756
by: Hystou | last post by:
Overview: Windows 11 and 10 have less user interface control over operating system update behaviour than previous versions of Windows. In Windows 11 and 10, there is no way to turn off the Windows Update option using the Control Panel or Settings app; it automatically checks for updates and installs any it finds, whether you like it or not. For most users, this new feature is actually very convenient. If you want to control the update process,...
0
10371
tracyyun
by: tracyyun | last post by:
Dear forum friends, With the development of smart home technology, a variety of wireless communication protocols have appeared on the market, such as Zigbee, Z-Wave, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, etc. Each protocol has its own unique characteristics and advantages, but as a user who is planning to build a smart home system, I am a bit confused by the choice of these technologies. I'm particularly interested in Zigbee because I've heard it does some...
0
9513
agi2029
by: agi2029 | last post by:
Let's talk about the concept of autonomous AI software engineers and no-code agents. These AIs are designed to manage the entire lifecycle of a software development project—planning, coding, testing, and deployment—without human intervention. Imagine an AI that can take a project description, break it down, write the code, debug it, and then launch it, all on its own.... Now, this would greatly impact the work of software developers. The idea...
1
7914
isladogs
by: isladogs | last post by:
The next Access Europe User Group meeting will be on Wednesday 1 May 2024 starting at 18:00 UK time (6PM UTC+1) and finishing by 19:30 (7.30PM). In this session, we are pleased to welcome a new presenter, Adolph Dupré who will be discussing some powerful techniques for using class modules. He will explain when you may want to use classes instead of User Defined Types (UDT). For example, to manage the data in unbound forms. Adolph will...
0
5741
by: TSSRALBI | last post by:
Hello I'm a network technician in training and I need your help. I am currently learning how to create and manage the different types of VPNs and I have a question about LAN-to-LAN VPNs. The last exercise I practiced was to create a LAN-to-LAN VPN between two Pfsense firewalls, by using IPSEC protocols. I succeeded, with both firewalls in the same network. But I'm wondering if it's possible to do the same thing, with 2 Pfsense firewalls...
0
5941
by: adsilva | last post by:
A Windows Forms form does not have the event Unload, like VB6. What one acts like?
3
3186
bsmnconsultancy
by: bsmnconsultancy | last post by:
In today's digital era, a well-designed website is crucial for businesses looking to succeed. Whether you're a small business owner or a large corporation in Toronto, having a strong online presence can significantly impact your brand's success. BSMN Consultancy, a leader in Website Development in Toronto offers valuable insights into creating effective websites that not only look great but also perform exceptionally well. In this comprehensive...

By using Bytes.com and it's services, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

To disable or enable advertisements and analytics tracking please visit the manage ads & tracking page.