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Use Interfaces to Hook up Event Handlers

I have a class, which implements an interface. Let's say, that the interface
looks something like

Public Interface IEventSinks
Sub ValueChanged(se nder As Object, e As ValueChangedEve ntArgs)
Sub StateUpdated(se nder As Object, e As StateUpdatedEve ntArgs)
End Interface

In practice, the interface contains many more event handlers like this, but
you get the picture.

I have another interface like this

Public Interface IEventSinks2
Sub SomethingElseHa ppened(sender As Object, e As
SomethingElseHa ppenedEventArgs )
...
End Interface

Then, I have my classes:

Public Class ClassA
Inherits ClassBase
Implements IEventSinks

...
End Class

Public Class ClassB
Inherits ClassBase
Implements IEventSinks2

...
End Class

Now, in my main code, I have

Dim obj1 As ClassBase = New ClassA
Dim obj2 As ClassBase = New ClassB

If TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks Then
AddHandler ValueChangedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.ValueChang ed
AddHandler StateUpdatedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.StateUpdat ed

ElseIf TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks2 Then
AddHandler SomethingElseHa ppenedEventSour ce, AddressOf
obj1.SomethingE lseHappened
Endif
As you can see, even for a couple of event handlers it starts to get a bit
messy, and hard to maintain. In reality, I have seven different object types
and eight different interfaces that may or may not be implemented. Depending
on the interfaces implemented, I need to notify my classes of different
events.

Is there a more convenient way to hook up handlers based on interfaces
implemented? For example, if my event source class and event handler class
both implement a particular interface, it would be great if I could just
write one line that says "ClassX handles all events raised by ClassY based
on a common interface".

As Cor has already observed, I try to simplify my examples initially and
build them up later, so if what I am trying to do looks odd it could be
because I am paraphrasing.

TIA

Charles
Nov 20 '05 #1
6 1783
Charles,
Have you considered simply using the Interfaces as the event handlers?

Which effectively is Java's "Event Listener" pattern?

Instead of using AddHandler to add each method of the interface to the
Event, save the Interface variable itself in a collection, when you go to
raise the Event, iterate this collection and call the respective method.

Hope this helps
Jay

"Charles Law" <bl***@nowhere. com> wrote in message
news:ey******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
I have a class, which implements an interface. Let's say, that the interface looks something like

Public Interface IEventSinks
Sub ValueChanged(se nder As Object, e As ValueChangedEve ntArgs)
Sub StateUpdated(se nder As Object, e As StateUpdatedEve ntArgs)
End Interface

In practice, the interface contains many more event handlers like this, but you get the picture.

I have another interface like this

Public Interface IEventSinks2
Sub SomethingElseHa ppened(sender As Object, e As
SomethingElseHa ppenedEventArgs )
...
End Interface

Then, I have my classes:

Public Class ClassA
Inherits ClassBase
Implements IEventSinks

...
End Class

Public Class ClassB
Inherits ClassBase
Implements IEventSinks2

...
End Class

Now, in my main code, I have

Dim obj1 As ClassBase = New ClassA
Dim obj2 As ClassBase = New ClassB

If TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks Then
AddHandler ValueChangedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.ValueChang ed
AddHandler StateUpdatedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.StateUpdat ed

ElseIf TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks2 Then
AddHandler SomethingElseHa ppenedEventSour ce, AddressOf
obj1.SomethingE lseHappened
Endif
As you can see, even for a couple of event handlers it starts to get a bit
messy, and hard to maintain. In reality, I have seven different object types and eight different interfaces that may or may not be implemented. Depending on the interfaces implemented, I need to notify my classes of different
events.

Is there a more convenient way to hook up handlers based on interfaces
implemented? For example, if my event source class and event handler class
both implement a particular interface, it would be great if I could just
write one line that says "ClassX handles all events raised by ClassY based
on a common interface".

As Cor has already observed, I try to simplify my examples initially and
build them up later, so if what I am trying to do looks odd it could be
because I am paraphrasing.

TIA

Charles

Nov 20 '05 #2
Hi Jay

I think I understand what you mean, in principle, but could you maybe give a
simple example, perhaps based on my sample below? One of the things I have
also to take into account, is that a class may implement multiple
interfaces, so I would need to be able to cater for that as well.

Thanks.

Charles
"Jay B. Harlow [MVP - Outlook]" <Ja************ @msn.com> wrote in message
news:OK******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
Charles,
Have you considered simply using the Interfaces as the event handlers?

Which effectively is Java's "Event Listener" pattern?

Instead of using AddHandler to add each method of the interface to the
Event, save the Interface variable itself in a collection, when you go to
raise the Event, iterate this collection and call the respective method.

Hope this helps
Jay

"Charles Law" <bl***@nowhere. com> wrote in message
news:ey******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
I have a class, which implements an interface. Let's say, that the

interface
looks something like

Public Interface IEventSinks
Sub ValueChanged(se nder As Object, e As ValueChangedEve ntArgs)
Sub StateUpdated(se nder As Object, e As StateUpdatedEve ntArgs)
End Interface

In practice, the interface contains many more event handlers like this,

but
you get the picture.

I have another interface like this

Public Interface IEventSinks2
Sub SomethingElseHa ppened(sender As Object, e As
SomethingElseHa ppenedEventArgs )
...
End Interface

Then, I have my classes:

Public Class ClassA
Inherits ClassBase
Implements IEventSinks

...
End Class

Public Class ClassB
Inherits ClassBase
Implements IEventSinks2

...
End Class

Now, in my main code, I have

Dim obj1 As ClassBase = New ClassA
Dim obj2 As ClassBase = New ClassB

If TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks Then
AddHandler ValueChangedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.ValueChang ed
AddHandler StateUpdatedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.StateUpdat ed

ElseIf TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks2 Then
AddHandler SomethingElseHa ppenedEventSour ce, AddressOf
obj1.SomethingE lseHappened
Endif
As you can see, even for a couple of event handlers it starts to get a bit messy, and hard to maintain. In reality, I have seven different object

types
and eight different interfaces that may or may not be implemented.

Depending
on the interfaces implemented, I need to notify my classes of different
events.

Is there a more convenient way to hook up handlers based on interfaces
implemented? For example, if my event source class and event handler class both implement a particular interface, it would be great if I could just
write one line that says "ClassX handles all events raised by ClassY based on a common interface".

As Cor has already observed, I try to simplify my examples initially and
build them up later, so if what I am trying to do looks odd it could be
because I am paraphrasing.

TIA

Charles


Nov 20 '05 #3
Charles,
You can implement the IEventSinks collection something like:

Public Class EventSinkCollec tion
Inherits CollectionBase

Public Sub Add(ByVal eventSink As IEventSinks)
Me.InnerList.Ad d(eventSink)
End Sub

Public Sub Remove(ByVal eventSink As IEventSinks)
Me.InnerList.Re move(eventSink)
End Sub

Public Sub RaiseValueChang ed(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As
ValueChangedEve ntArgs)
For Each sink As IEventSinks In Me.InnerList
sink.ValueChang ed(sender, e)
Next
End Sub

Public Sub RaiseStateUpdat ed(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As
StateUpdatedEve ntArgs)
For Each sink As IEventSinks In Me.InnerList
sink.StateUpdat ed(sender, e)
Next
End Sub

End Class

Then when ever you wanted to raise the ValueChanged event you would call
EventSinkCollec tion.RaiseValue Changed.

The IEventSinks2 collection would be implemented in a similar manner.

Every object that raised the IEventSinks' events would need to have an
instance of the EventSinkCollec tion object & delegate methods to it.

Hope this helps
Jay

"Charles Law" <bl***@nowhere. com> wrote in message
news:ON******** *****@tk2msftng p13.phx.gbl...
Hi Jay

I think I understand what you mean, in principle, but could you maybe give a simple example, perhaps based on my sample below? One of the things I have
also to take into account, is that a class may implement multiple
interfaces, so I would need to be able to cater for that as well.

Thanks.

Charles
"Jay B. Harlow [MVP - Outlook]" <Ja************ @msn.com> wrote in message
news:OK******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
Charles,
Have you considered simply using the Interfaces as the event handlers?

Which effectively is Java's "Event Listener" pattern?

Instead of using AddHandler to add each method of the interface to the
Event, save the Interface variable itself in a collection, when you go to
raise the Event, iterate this collection and call the respective method.

Hope this helps
Jay

"Charles Law" <bl***@nowhere. com> wrote in message
news:ey******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
I have a class, which implements an interface. Let's say, that the

interface
looks something like

Public Interface IEventSinks
Sub ValueChanged(se nder As Object, e As ValueChangedEve ntArgs)
Sub StateUpdated(se nder As Object, e As StateUpdatedEve ntArgs)
End Interface

In practice, the interface contains many more event handlers like this,
but
you get the picture.

I have another interface like this

Public Interface IEventSinks2
Sub SomethingElseHa ppened(sender As Object, e As
SomethingElseHa ppenedEventArgs )
...
End Interface

Then, I have my classes:

Public Class ClassA
Inherits ClassBase
Implements IEventSinks

...
End Class

Public Class ClassB
Inherits ClassBase
Implements IEventSinks2

...
End Class

Now, in my main code, I have

Dim obj1 As ClassBase = New ClassA
Dim obj2 As ClassBase = New ClassB

If TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks Then
AddHandler ValueChangedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.ValueChang ed
AddHandler StateUpdatedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.StateUpdat ed

ElseIf TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks2 Then
AddHandler SomethingElseHa ppenedEventSour ce, AddressOf
obj1.SomethingE lseHappened
Endif
As you can see, even for a couple of event handlers it starts to get a

bit messy, and hard to maintain. In reality, I have seven different object

types
and eight different interfaces that may or may not be implemented.

Depending
on the interfaces implemented, I need to notify my classes of
different events.

Is there a more convenient way to hook up handlers based on interfaces
implemented? For example, if my event source class and event handler

class both implement a particular interface, it would be great if I could just write one line that says "ClassX handles all events raised by ClassY based on a common interface".

As Cor has already observed, I try to simplify my examples initially and build them up later, so if what I am trying to do looks odd it could be because I am paraphrasing.

TIA

Charles



Nov 20 '05 #4
Charles,
You can implement the IEventSinks collection something like:

Public Class EventSinkCollec tion
Inherits CollectionBase

Public Sub Add(ByVal eventSink As IEventSinks)
Me.InnerList.Ad d(eventSink)
End Sub

Public Sub Remove(ByVal eventSink As IEventSinks)
Me.InnerList.Re move(eventSink)
End Sub

Public Sub RaiseValueChang ed(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As
ValueChangedEve ntArgs)
For Each sink As IEventSinks In Me.InnerList
sink.ValueChang ed(sender, e)
Next
End Sub

Public Sub RaiseStateUpdat ed(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As
StateUpdatedEve ntArgs)
For Each sink As IEventSinks In Me.InnerList
sink.StateUpdat ed(sender, e)
Next
End Sub

End Class

Then when ever you wanted to raise the ValueChanged event you would call
EventSinkCollec tion.RaiseValue Changed.

The IEventSinks2 collection would be implemented in a similar manner.

Every object that raised the IEventSinks' events would need to have an
instance of the EventSinkCollec tion object & delegate methods to it.

Hope this helps
Jay

"Charles Law" <bl***@nowhere. com> wrote in message
news:ON******** *****@tk2msftng p13.phx.gbl...
Hi Jay

I think I understand what you mean, in principle, but could you maybe give a simple example, perhaps based on my sample below? One of the things I have
also to take into account, is that a class may implement multiple
interfaces, so I would need to be able to cater for that as well.

Thanks.

Charles
"Jay B. Harlow [MVP - Outlook]" <Ja************ @msn.com> wrote in message
news:OK******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
Charles,
Have you considered simply using the Interfaces as the event handlers?

Which effectively is Java's "Event Listener" pattern?

Instead of using AddHandler to add each method of the interface to the
Event, save the Interface variable itself in a collection, when you go to
raise the Event, iterate this collection and call the respective method.

Hope this helps
Jay

"Charles Law" <bl***@nowhere. com> wrote in message
news:ey******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
I have a class, which implements an interface. Let's say, that the

interface
looks something like

Public Interface IEventSinks
Sub ValueChanged(se nder As Object, e As ValueChangedEve ntArgs)
Sub StateUpdated(se nder As Object, e As StateUpdatedEve ntArgs)
End Interface

In practice, the interface contains many more event handlers like this,
but
you get the picture.

I have another interface like this

Public Interface IEventSinks2
Sub SomethingElseHa ppened(sender As Object, e As
SomethingElseHa ppenedEventArgs )
...
End Interface

Then, I have my classes:

Public Class ClassA
Inherits ClassBase
Implements IEventSinks

...
End Class

Public Class ClassB
Inherits ClassBase
Implements IEventSinks2

...
End Class

Now, in my main code, I have

Dim obj1 As ClassBase = New ClassA
Dim obj2 As ClassBase = New ClassB

If TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks Then
AddHandler ValueChangedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.ValueChang ed
AddHandler StateUpdatedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.StateUpdat ed

ElseIf TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks2 Then
AddHandler SomethingElseHa ppenedEventSour ce, AddressOf
obj1.SomethingE lseHappened
Endif
As you can see, even for a couple of event handlers it starts to get a

bit messy, and hard to maintain. In reality, I have seven different object

types
and eight different interfaces that may or may not be implemented.

Depending
on the interfaces implemented, I need to notify my classes of
different events.

Is there a more convenient way to hook up handlers based on interfaces
implemented? For example, if my event source class and event handler

class both implement a particular interface, it would be great if I could just write one line that says "ClassX handles all events raised by ClassY based on a common interface".

As Cor has already observed, I try to simplify my examples initially and build them up later, so if what I am trying to do looks odd it could be because I am paraphrasing.

TIA

Charles



Nov 20 '05 #5
Thanks Jay, I get it now.

Charles
"Jay B. Harlow [MVP - Outlook]" <Ja************ @msn.com> wrote in message
news:%2******** **********@TK2M SFTNGP12.phx.gb l...
Charles,
You can implement the IEventSinks collection something like:

Public Class EventSinkCollec tion
Inherits CollectionBase

Public Sub Add(ByVal eventSink As IEventSinks)
Me.InnerList.Ad d(eventSink)
End Sub

Public Sub Remove(ByVal eventSink As IEventSinks)
Me.InnerList.Re move(eventSink)
End Sub

Public Sub RaiseValueChang ed(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As
ValueChangedEve ntArgs)
For Each sink As IEventSinks In Me.InnerList
sink.ValueChang ed(sender, e)
Next
End Sub

Public Sub RaiseStateUpdat ed(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As
StateUpdatedEve ntArgs)
For Each sink As IEventSinks In Me.InnerList
sink.StateUpdat ed(sender, e)
Next
End Sub

End Class

Then when ever you wanted to raise the ValueChanged event you would call
EventSinkCollec tion.RaiseValue Changed.

The IEventSinks2 collection would be implemented in a similar manner.

Every object that raised the IEventSinks' events would need to have an
instance of the EventSinkCollec tion object & delegate methods to it.

Hope this helps
Jay

"Charles Law" <bl***@nowhere. com> wrote in message
news:ON******** *****@tk2msftng p13.phx.gbl...
Hi Jay

I think I understand what you mean, in principle, but could you maybe give
a
simple example, perhaps based on my sample below? One of the things I have also to take into account, is that a class may implement multiple
interfaces, so I would need to be able to cater for that as well.

Thanks.

Charles
"Jay B. Harlow [MVP - Outlook]" <Ja************ @msn.com> wrote in message news:OK******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
Charles,
Have you considered simply using the Interfaces as the event handlers?

Which effectively is Java's "Event Listener" pattern?

Instead of using AddHandler to add each method of the interface to the
Event, save the Interface variable itself in a collection, when you go to raise the Event, iterate this collection and call the respective method.
Hope this helps
Jay

"Charles Law" <bl***@nowhere. com> wrote in message
news:ey******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
> I have a class, which implements an interface. Let's say, that the
interface
> looks something like
>
> Public Interface IEventSinks
> Sub ValueChanged(se nder As Object, e As ValueChangedEve ntArgs)
> Sub StateUpdated(se nder As Object, e As StateUpdatedEve ntArgs)
> End Interface
>
> In practice, the interface contains many more event handlers like this, but
> you get the picture.
>
> I have another interface like this
>
> Public Interface IEventSinks2
> Sub SomethingElseHa ppened(sender As Object, e As
> SomethingElseHa ppenedEventArgs )
> ...
> End Interface
>
> Then, I have my classes:
>
> Public Class ClassA
> Inherits ClassBase
> Implements IEventSinks
>
> ...
> End Class
>
> Public Class ClassB
> Inherits ClassBase
> Implements IEventSinks2
>
> ...
> End Class
>
> Now, in my main code, I have
>
> Dim obj1 As ClassBase = New ClassA
> Dim obj2 As ClassBase = New ClassB
>
> If TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks Then
> AddHandler ValueChangedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.ValueChang ed
> AddHandler StateUpdatedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.StateUpdat ed
>
> ElseIf TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks2 Then
> AddHandler SomethingElseHa ppenedEventSour ce, AddressOf
> obj1.SomethingE lseHappened
> Endif
>
>
> As you can see, even for a couple of event handlers it starts to get a bit
> messy, and hard to maintain. In reality, I have seven different
object types
> and eight different interfaces that may or may not be implemented.
Depending
> on the interfaces implemented, I need to notify my classes of

different > events.
>
> Is there a more convenient way to hook up handlers based on interfaces > implemented? For example, if my event source class and event handler

class
> both implement a particular interface, it would be great if I could just > write one line that says "ClassX handles all events raised by ClassY

based
> on a common interface".
>
> As Cor has already observed, I try to simplify my examples initially and > build them up later, so if what I am trying to do looks odd it could be > because I am paraphrasing.
>
> TIA
>
> Charles
>
>



Nov 20 '05 #6
Thanks Jay, I get it now.

Charles
"Jay B. Harlow [MVP - Outlook]" <Ja************ @msn.com> wrote in message
news:%2******** **********@TK2M SFTNGP12.phx.gb l...
Charles,
You can implement the IEventSinks collection something like:

Public Class EventSinkCollec tion
Inherits CollectionBase

Public Sub Add(ByVal eventSink As IEventSinks)
Me.InnerList.Ad d(eventSink)
End Sub

Public Sub Remove(ByVal eventSink As IEventSinks)
Me.InnerList.Re move(eventSink)
End Sub

Public Sub RaiseValueChang ed(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As
ValueChangedEve ntArgs)
For Each sink As IEventSinks In Me.InnerList
sink.ValueChang ed(sender, e)
Next
End Sub

Public Sub RaiseStateUpdat ed(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As
StateUpdatedEve ntArgs)
For Each sink As IEventSinks In Me.InnerList
sink.StateUpdat ed(sender, e)
Next
End Sub

End Class

Then when ever you wanted to raise the ValueChanged event you would call
EventSinkCollec tion.RaiseValue Changed.

The IEventSinks2 collection would be implemented in a similar manner.

Every object that raised the IEventSinks' events would need to have an
instance of the EventSinkCollec tion object & delegate methods to it.

Hope this helps
Jay

"Charles Law" <bl***@nowhere. com> wrote in message
news:ON******** *****@tk2msftng p13.phx.gbl...
Hi Jay

I think I understand what you mean, in principle, but could you maybe give
a
simple example, perhaps based on my sample below? One of the things I have also to take into account, is that a class may implement multiple
interfaces, so I would need to be able to cater for that as well.

Thanks.

Charles
"Jay B. Harlow [MVP - Outlook]" <Ja************ @msn.com> wrote in message news:OK******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
Charles,
Have you considered simply using the Interfaces as the event handlers?

Which effectively is Java's "Event Listener" pattern?

Instead of using AddHandler to add each method of the interface to the
Event, save the Interface variable itself in a collection, when you go to raise the Event, iterate this collection and call the respective method.
Hope this helps
Jay

"Charles Law" <bl***@nowhere. com> wrote in message
news:ey******** ******@tk2msftn gp13.phx.gbl...
> I have a class, which implements an interface. Let's say, that the
interface
> looks something like
>
> Public Interface IEventSinks
> Sub ValueChanged(se nder As Object, e As ValueChangedEve ntArgs)
> Sub StateUpdated(se nder As Object, e As StateUpdatedEve ntArgs)
> End Interface
>
> In practice, the interface contains many more event handlers like this, but
> you get the picture.
>
> I have another interface like this
>
> Public Interface IEventSinks2
> Sub SomethingElseHa ppened(sender As Object, e As
> SomethingElseHa ppenedEventArgs )
> ...
> End Interface
>
> Then, I have my classes:
>
> Public Class ClassA
> Inherits ClassBase
> Implements IEventSinks
>
> ...
> End Class
>
> Public Class ClassB
> Inherits ClassBase
> Implements IEventSinks2
>
> ...
> End Class
>
> Now, in my main code, I have
>
> Dim obj1 As ClassBase = New ClassA
> Dim obj2 As ClassBase = New ClassB
>
> If TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks Then
> AddHandler ValueChangedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.ValueChang ed
> AddHandler StateUpdatedEve ntSource, AddressOf obj1.StateUpdat ed
>
> ElseIf TypeOf obj1 Is IEventSinks2 Then
> AddHandler SomethingElseHa ppenedEventSour ce, AddressOf
> obj1.SomethingE lseHappened
> Endif
>
>
> As you can see, even for a couple of event handlers it starts to get a bit
> messy, and hard to maintain. In reality, I have seven different
object types
> and eight different interfaces that may or may not be implemented.
Depending
> on the interfaces implemented, I need to notify my classes of

different > events.
>
> Is there a more convenient way to hook up handlers based on interfaces > implemented? For example, if my event source class and event handler

class
> both implement a particular interface, it would be great if I could just > write one line that says "ClassX handles all events raised by ClassY

based
> on a common interface".
>
> As Cor has already observed, I try to simplify my examples initially and > build them up later, so if what I am trying to do looks odd it could be > because I am paraphrasing.
>
> TIA
>
> Charles
>
>



Nov 20 '05 #7

This thread has been closed and replies have been disabled. Please start a new discussion.

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Hello I'm a network technician in training and I need your help. I am currently learning how to create and manage the different types of VPNs and I have a question about LAN-to-LAN VPNs. The last exercise I practiced was to create a LAN-to-LAN VPN between two Pfsense firewalls, by using IPSEC protocols. I succeeded, with both firewalls in the same network. But I'm wondering if it's possible to do the same thing, with 2 Pfsense firewalls...
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4550
by: adsilva | last post by:
A Windows Forms form does not have the event Unload, like VB6. What one acts like?
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muto222
by: muto222 | last post by:
How can i add a mobile payment intergratation into php mysql website.
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bsmnconsultancy
by: bsmnconsultancy | last post by:
In today's digital era, a well-designed website is crucial for businesses looking to succeed. Whether you're a small business owner or a large corporation in Toronto, having a strong online presence can significantly impact your brand's success. BSMN Consultancy, a leader in Website Development in Toronto offers valuable insights into creating effective websites that not only look great but also perform exceptionally well. In this comprehensive...

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