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How to safely remove my USB drive from inside linux?

AmberJain
Expert 100+
P: 884
Hello,

After a successful installation of Xubuntu, I am posting this question.

In Windows XP we select option "Safely remove hardware" before we remove a USB drive (or Pen drive) from a computer. What is Linux equivalent of "Safely Remove USB drive" of windows.

I think if we unmount a USB drive then this is equivalent to "Safely remove USB drive" of XP. But I'm not sure and therefore I am psoting this here.


Thanks in advance............
AmbrNewlearner
Sep 28 '08 #1
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4 Replies

Nepomuk
Expert 2.5K+
P: 3,112
Basically, you're right. Unmounting is even more than "safely remove hardware", as in some cases Linux doesn't write the data to the drive before you unmount it.

Greetings,
Nepomuk
Sep 28 '08 #2

AmberJain
Expert 100+
P: 884
Thanks nepoumk ;)..........

Cheers,
AmbrNewlearner
Sep 29 '08 #3

AmberJain
Expert 100+
P: 884
Hello,

Basically, you're right. Unmounting is even more than "safely remove hardware", as in some cases Linux doesn't write the data to the drive before you unmount it.
I'm little confused.
As you say that (in some cases) Linux doesnot writes data to the drive before user unmount it. But if this is true then there must be some temporary location where the files are stored until they are actually written to drive when it is unmounted. Can you please post that temporary location?

Also, Is your quote above true only for removable devices or can that be applied to non removable devices too?


Thanks.........
AmbrNewlearner
Oct 1 '08 #4

P: 1
As you say that (in some cases) Linux doesnot writes data to the drive before user unmount it. But if this is true then there must be some temporary location where the files are stored until they are actually written to drive when it is unmounted.
True indeed. It's the file system cache (a memory area in kernel space). Almost any Linux file system uses it for performance reasons.

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Oct 3 '08 #5

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