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Is there any command in UDB/Linux to List all mount points for a given instance?

P: 25
Hi all,
Is there a command or a method of listing all mount points for a given DB2 instance? Any help will be much appreciated.

Thanks
Nov 8 '07 #1
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5 Replies

docdiesel
Expert 100+
P: 297
Hi,

what do you mean with "mount points"? In Linux jargon these are points in filesystems where you hook in some device (disk, cd, nfs) and add its branch to the filesystem tree. So this is a matter related to the operating system.

Are you talking about the list of open files or activated databases?

Regards, Bernd
Nov 9 '07 #2

P: 25
Hi and thanks for your response/question. Restating my question, I am interested in finding all mount points for my Linux environments including those in what I may term "sub-directories". Here's why. I issue a mount command and I get:
/dev/sda1 on /ald type ext3 (rw)
/dev/sdb1 on /ali type ext3 (rw)
/dev/sdc1 on /alt type ext3 (rw)
/dev/sdd1 on /bbd type ext3 (rw)
/dev/sde1 on /bbi type ext3 (rw)
/dev/sdf1 on /bbt type ext3 (rw)
/dev/sdg1 on /dmd type ext3 (rw)
/dev/sdh1 on /dmi type ext3 (rw)
/dev/sdi1 on /dmt type ext3 (rw)
/dev/sdj1 on /dwd type ext3 (rw)
/dev/sdk1 on /dwi type ext3 (rw)
/dev/sdl1 on /dwt type ext3 (rw)

I then entered cd /sbin and I am routed to /sbin. Now, looking at the output of mount command, I did not see /sbin listed as a mount point. Why is that?
This is why I am looking for command that will list all mount points regardless of the level in the directory path.

Thanks
Nov 9 '07 #3

docdiesel
Expert 100+
P: 297
Hi okonita,

first, this is clearly a Linux/Unix issue and is not related to DB2. Therefore I'll suggest this thread to be moved to another forum.

Nevertheless, I'll try to answer your question and make things clear.

The mount command doesn't show /sbin because it's no mount point. I'll show you an example (and try to be better at ascii art than Picasso):

Expand|Select|Wrap|Line Numbers
  1. list of mount points:
  2. /dev/sda1     /boot
  3. /dev/sda3     /
  4. /dev/sdb1     /home
  5.  
  6. /  (this is the <root> directory = /dev/sda3)
  7. + bin   (simple directory)
  8. + boot  (mountpoint of /dev/sda1)
  9. + home  (mountpoint of /dev/sdb1)
  10. |    + john
  11. |    + peter
  12. |    + mary
  13. + sbin  (simple directory)
  14.  
There could also be a directory /home/john/deep/down/the/filesystem which is the mountpoint for some remote nfs service.

Furthermore, your list of mountpoint is rather unusual - they don't seem to be system related but are all placed in the root (top) directory. More common is to gather them in a directory on second level.

Regards,

Bernd
Nov 9 '07 #4

Purple
Expert 100+
P: 404
I am going to move this post to the Linux forum

MODERATOR
Nov 16 '07 #5

numberwhun
Expert Mod 2.5K+
P: 3,503
Hi okonita,

first, this is clearly a Linux/Unix issue and is not related to DB2. Therefore I'll suggest this thread to be moved to another forum.

Nevertheless, I'll try to answer your question and make things clear.

The mount command doesn't show /sbin because it's no mount point. I'll show you an example (and try to be better at ascii art than Picasso):

Expand|Select|Wrap|Line Numbers
  1. list of mount points:
  2. /dev/sda1     /boot
  3. /dev/sda3     /
  4. /dev/sdb1     /home
  5.  
  6. /  (this is the <root> directory = /dev/sda3)
  7. + bin   (simple directory)
  8. + boot  (mountpoint of /dev/sda1)
  9. + home  (mountpoint of /dev/sdb1)
  10. |    + john
  11. |    + peter
  12. |    + mary
  13. + sbin  (simple directory)
  14.  
There could also be a directory /home/john/deep/down/the/filesystem which is the mountpoint for some remote nfs service.

Furthermore, your list of mountpoint is rather unusual - they don't seem to be system related but are all placed in the root (top) directory. More common is to gather them in a directory on second level.

Regards,

Bernd
Don't know if it would help, but you could do a "df -k" and it will show all the mounted points and also give sizes as well.

Regards,

Jeff
Nov 16 '07 #6

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