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SQL 2000 Q: duplicate database

Hi folks

I know just enough about MS-SQL to be dangerous, so feel free to warn
me off this it's too much for a non-expert.

We are using SQL 2000 as the back-end for website. We would like to
create a duplicate of the database (on the same server). Then we'd use
them like this:

Database A: read-write DB accessed by web administrator
Database B: read-only 'live' DB accessed by the web server

The smarts: setting up a way to maintain Database A, have it be
accessible internally (maybe different IP, maybe different port) and
when a change is approved, have that change replicate to Database B to
be visible on the website.

I'm wondering if it's something I can do myself with the right
reading, or I'm going to have to hire some SQL know-how to help me
out.
Dave
Jul 20 '05 #1
1 2610

"Dave" <do*****@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:81**************************@posting.google.c om...
Hi folks

I know just enough about MS-SQL to be dangerous, so feel free to warn
me off this it's too much for a non-expert.

We are using SQL 2000 as the back-end for website. We would like to
create a duplicate of the database (on the same server). Then we'd use
them like this:

Database A: read-write DB accessed by web administrator
Database B: read-only 'live' DB accessed by the web server
We do something similar to this with two servers. (That way if one crashes,
we have more options).

Believe it or not, one option I'd consider is replication. Yes, it's
unusual to have the publisher, distributer and subscriber on the same
machine, but nothing rules it out.

Another way is to do log-shipping.

The smarts: setting up a way to maintain Database A, have it be
accessible internally (maybe different IP, maybe different port) and
when a change is approved, have that change replicate to Database B to
be visible on the website.
You could do multiple instances of SQL Server, but then I'm pretty sure you
need Enterprise license which greatly drives up your cost.


I'm wondering if it's something I can do myself with the right
reading, or I'm going to have to hire some SQL know-how to help me
out.
Dave

Jul 20 '05 #2

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