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device CALs

P: n/a
Hi,

I am slightly confused about the meaning of a 'device cal'
(specifically for sql server but I guess the same applies to other ms
licences)

In the examples about device cals, there is a picture of a number of
windows desktops connected to a database server. each desktop can
potentially be used by a number of users and requires one device cal.
All well and good.

Now, say I have a web application hosted hosted on a different machine
and connecting to SQL server. the SQL server licencing FAQ says

"A device CAL covers multiple users' access to server software from a
single, shared device."

is my web server a shared device? so does the web server require a
single device CAL no matter how many users use it?

Andy
Jul 20 '05 #1
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9 Replies


P: n/a
For a database that is accessible via a Web application you must use a
Processor Licence. Device CALs then aren't required.

--
David Portas
SQL Server MVP
--
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a

"David Portas" <RE****************************@acm.org> wrote in message
news:RM********************@giganews.com...
For a database that is accessible via a Web application you must use a
Processor Licence. Device CALs then aren't required.
I'm going to jump in here and say, "I'm not sure that's quite 100% true."
If it's publically accessed or access is not controlled in some assured
method (i.e. login, etc.) I believe it's true. Last time I checked, I think
if you had say an in-house application (say an accounting package) and each
desktop had a CAL covering it, you'd be covered.

Has this changed?


--
David Portas
SQL Server MVP
--

Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
Hi David

Regarding your answer, do they really expect someone to buy a processor
license for 3,185.00 / US$ 5800 ?? That's not feasable for small sites..

The MSDE 2000A EULA says:
4. NO RENTAL/COMMERCIAL HOSTING. You may not rent, lease, lend or provide
commercial hosting services with the Software.

Does that mean I cannot have a web application using MSDE as a backend
database?
If not, MSDE would be a good solution, given someone can live with the
limitations.

Also, do you know, that's more of a Windos Server 2003 Web Edition question
but goes in the same direction:
Microsoft says it's prohibited to install any applications on the Web
Edition. Does this include MSDE 2000A?

Thanks for your thoughts!

Martin

"David Portas" <RE****************************@acm.org> wrote in message
news:RM********************@giganews.com...
For a database that is accessible via a Web application you must use a
Processor Licence. Device CALs then aren't required.

--
David Portas
SQL Server MVP
--

Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
"Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)" <mo****************@greenms.com> wrote in message news:<FH*******************@twister.nyroc.rr.com>. ..
"David Portas" <RE****************************@acm.org> wrote in message
news:RM********************@giganews.com...
For a database that is accessible via a Web application you must use a
Processor Licence. Device CALs then aren't required.
I'm going to jump in here and say, "I'm not sure that's quite 100% true."
If it's publically accessed or access is not controlled in some assured
method (i.e. login, etc.) I believe it's true. Last time I checked, I think
if you had say an in-house application (say an accounting package) and each
desktop had a CAL covering it, you'd be covered.


what I'm not sure is what is the definition of a device? why should
each desktop require a CAL when the only "device" (i.e. computer?)
accessing SQL is the web server machine?

--
David Portas
SQL Server MVP
--

Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
As the responses have shown, licensing questions are a minefield of "What
If?s". If in doubt, consult your vendor or a Microsoft representative.

I believe Greg may be correct that if you have something like a VPN, where
the total number of users in the system is restricted then Server/CAL
licensing may be used.
what I'm not sure is what is the definition of a device? why should
each desktop require a CAL when the only "device" (i.e. computer?)
accessing SQL is the web server machine?


Why? Because that's the licensing model that Microsoft sells.

http://www.microsoft.com/sql/howtobuy/

"Regardless of how many tiers of hardware or software exist between the SQL
Server and the client devices that ultimately use its data, services, or
functionality, a CAL is required for each distinct input to the
multiplexing, pooling, or related software or the hardware front end.
Processor licensing will likely be the appropriate licensing option in these
situations, due to its simplicity and affordability."

--
David Portas
SQL Server MVP
--
Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
> Does that mean I cannot have a web application using MSDE as a backend
database?
If not, MSDE would be a good solution, given someone can live with the
limitations.
"MSDE is an ideal solution for basic Web applications with up to 25
concurrent users."
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/msde/howtobuy/msdeuse.asp

Also, do you know, that's more of a Windos Server 2003 Web Edition question but goes in the same direction:
Microsoft says it's prohibited to install any applications on the Web
Edition. Does this include MSDE 2000A?


I'm not familiar with 2003 Web Ed.

--
David Portas
SQL Server MVP
--
Jul 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
Thanks David!

"David Portas" <RE****************************@acm.org> wrote in message
news:MY********************@giganews.com...
Does that mean I cannot have a web application using MSDE as a backend
database?
If not, MSDE would be a good solution, given someone can live with the
limitations.


"MSDE is an ideal solution for basic Web applications with up to 25
concurrent users."
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/msde/howtobuy/msdeuse.asp

Also, do you know, that's more of a Windos Server 2003 Web Edition

question
but goes in the same direction:
Microsoft says it's prohibited to install any applications on the Web
Edition. Does this include MSDE 2000A?


I'm not familiar with 2003 Web Ed.

--
David Portas
SQL Server MVP
--

Jul 20 '05 #8

P: n/a
Martin Feuersteiner (th************@hotmail.com) writes:
Also, do you know, that's more of a Windos Server 2003 Web Edition
question but goes in the same direction: Microsoft says it's prohibited
to install any applications on the Web Edition. Does this include MSDE
2000A?


You may install MSDE on Windows 2003 Web Edition. That is also the only
edition of SQL Server that you can install on Web Edition.

Since you say that it is not permitted to install applications on Web
Edition, I would guess that it is not permitted to install MSDE on your
Web Edition machine for any other purpose than to be the backend to
your web server.

But for a decisive answer on all licensing questions, it is best to ask
a Microsoft representative.
--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server SP3 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinf...2000/books.asp
Jul 20 '05 #9

P: n/a
"David Portas" <RE****************************@acm.org> wrote in message news:<aI********************@giganews.com>...
As the responses have shown, licensing questions are a minefield of "What
If?s". If in doubt, consult your vendor or a Microsoft representative.

I believe Greg may be correct that if you have something like a VPN, where
the total number of users in the system is restricted then Server/CAL
licensing may be used.
what I'm not sure is what is the definition of a device? why should
each desktop require a CAL when the only "device" (i.e. computer?)
accessing SQL is the web server machine?


Why? Because that's the licensing model that Microsoft sells.

http://www.microsoft.com/sql/howtobuy/

"Regardless of how many tiers of hardware or software exist between the SQL
Server and the client devices that ultimately use its data, services, or
functionality, a CAL is required for each distinct input to the
multiplexing, pooling, or related software or the hardware front end.
Processor licensing will likely be the appropriate licensing option in these
situations, due to its simplicity and affordability."

Thanks, that's just the bit I was looking for (I wasn't arguing with
the licencing model, just looking for a deifinitive statement)
Jul 20 '05 #10

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