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Add a second databse - benefits?

P: n/a


Hi, there is an existing application running on a SQL Server database.

Now I have to built a different app, which will have two common tables
with the existing database (Customers, sales)

Is there any benefit (performance mainly) creating the tables for the
new app in a new database? (On the same machine and the same instance)


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Jul 20 '05 #1
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chora (ch*****@hotmail.com) writes:
Hi, there is an existing application running on a SQL Server database.

Now I have to built a different app, which will have two common tables
with the existing database (Customers, sales)

Is there any benefit (performance mainly) creating the tables for the
new app in a new database? (On the same machine and the same instance)


There is too little information to say anything with certainty. If the
two apps not only share the table definitions, but also the data in
the table, putting everything in the same database.

As long as the applications are access their individual tables, there
is not much interferance between them. All I can think is that autogrow
caused by one app will affect the userss of the other app two, but
autogrows should not occur frequently.

Of course, in the common tables there may be blocking issues with
improper application design.
--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server SP3 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinf...2000/books.asp
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a


Erland ,

thanks for the reply.

The databases will share the data of the two tables. The new database
will have 'read only' access to these tables.

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Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
Hi

If these tables are large, then you may want to make them federated and
create a partitioned view for them. This may give you a performance
improvement e.g http://vyaskn.tripod.com/federated.htm

There may also be other reasons to use a separate database such as ownership
(e.g if a third party package it may invalidate the waranty to stick extra
tables in there), security and maintainance.

John

"chora" <ch*****@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:40**********************@news.newsgroups.ws.. .


Hi, there is an existing application running on a SQL Server database.

Now I have to built a different app, which will have two common tables
with the existing database (Customers, sales)

Is there any benefit (performance mainly) creating the tables for the
new app in a new database? (On the same machine and the same instance)


*** Sent via Devdex http://www.devdex.com ***
Don't just participate in USENET...get rewarded for it!

Jul 20 '05 #4

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