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Howto work and manage Backup Logfiles?

P: n/a
Hello,

I have run into some problems with logfiles and backup logfiles (MS
SQL server). I have read much about them but uptil now I dont seem to
grasp how it works. Specially the part of working with backup log
files.

Can someone please help me with this?

What I want todo is to create backup log files, so I can restore the
database to any point in time before a failure occured. But using this
method create's a problem with the backup log files. They get very
big.

So how can I use backup log files without getting to large backup log
files?

How can I shrink on a regular basis the backup log files and still be
able to restore the database?

Please help.

Best regards,

Marc Janssen,
ma***@no-spam-please.netlane.com
:)
Jul 20 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a

"deprins" <ma***@netlane.com> wrote in message
news:59*************************@posting.google.co m...
Hello,

I have run into some problems with logfiles and backup logfiles (MS
SQL server). I have read much about them but uptil now I dont seem to
grasp how it works. Specially the part of working with backup log
files.

Can someone please help me with this?

What I want todo is to create backup log files, so I can restore the
database to any point in time before a failure occured. But using this
method create's a problem with the backup log files. They get very
big.

So how can I use backup log files without getting to large backup log
files?

How can I shrink on a regular basis the backup log files and still be
able to restore the database?

Please help.

Best regards,

Marc Janssen,
ma***@no-spam-please.netlane.com
:)


Are you saying that your log backups (.BAK) are large, or that the log file
itself (.LDF) is too large? Assuming it's the backup files, then there
probably isn't much you can do - if the backups are large, that means a lot
of transactions are happening, so a lot of space is required to log them.
You could compress the backups on disk with a compression tool to save disk
space, but that would complicate a recovery. Depending on how long you need
to store the backups for, you might be able to use differential backups, and
then delete old log backups.

If you mean the log file itself is too large, then see here:

http://support.microsoft.com/default...&Product=sql2k

If this doesn't help, perhaps you can provide some more information - which
version of MSSQL, which recovery model are you using, what is your current
backup schedule, how big is the database and the backup files, etc.

Simon
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a

"deprins" <ma***@netlane.com> wrote in message
news:59*************************@posting.google.co m...
Hello,

I have run into some problems with logfiles and backup logfiles (MS
SQL server). I have read much about them but uptil now I dont seem to
grasp how it works. Specially the part of working with backup log
files.

Can someone please help me with this?

What I want todo is to create backup log files, so I can restore the
database to any point in time before a failure occured. But using this
method create's a problem with the backup log files. They get very
big.

So how can I use backup log files without getting to large backup log
files?

How can I shrink on a regular basis the backup log files and still be
able to restore the database?

Please help.

Best regards,

Marc Janssen,
ma***@no-spam-please.netlane.com
:)


Are you saying that your log backups (.BAK) are large, or that the log file
itself (.LDF) is too large? Assuming it's the backup files, then there
probably isn't much you can do - if the backups are large, that means a lot
of transactions are happening, so a lot of space is required to log them.
You could compress the backups on disk with a compression tool to save disk
space, but that would complicate a recovery. Depending on how long you need
to store the backups for, you might be able to use differential backups, and
then delete old log backups.

If you mean the log file itself is too large, then see here:

http://support.microsoft.com/default...&Product=sql2k

If this doesn't help, perhaps you can provide some more information - which
version of MSSQL, which recovery model are you using, what is your current
backup schedule, how big is the database and the backup files, etc.

Simon
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Simon Hayes" <sq*@hayes.ch> wrote in message news:<40**********@news.bluewin.ch>...
"deprins" <ma***@netlane.com> wrote in message
news:59*************************@posting.google.co m...
Hello,

I have run into some problems with logfiles and backup logfiles (MS
SQL server). I have read much about them but uptil now I dont seem to
grasp how it works. Specially the part of working with backup log
files.

Can someone please help me with this?

What I want todo is to create backup log files, so I can restore the
database to any point in time before a failure occured. But using this
method create's a problem with the backup log files. They get very
big.

So how can I use backup log files without getting to large backup log
files?

How can I shrink on a regular basis the backup log files and still be
able to restore the database?

Please help.

Best regards,

Marc Janssen,
ma***@no-spam-please.netlane.com
:)


Are you saying that your log backups (.BAK) are large, or that the log file
itself (.LDF) is too large? Assuming it's the backup files, then there
probably isn't much you can do - if the backups are large, that means a lot
of transactions are happening, so a lot of space is required to log them.
You could compress the backups on disk with a compression tool to save disk
space, but that would complicate a recovery. Depending on how long you need
to store the backups for, you might be able to use differential backups, and
then delete old log backups.

If you mean the log file itself is too large, then see here:

http://support.microsoft.com/default...&Product=sql2k

If this doesn't help, perhaps you can provide some more information - which
version of MSSQL, which recovery model are you using, what is your current
backup schedule, how big is the database and the backup files, etc.

Simon

Hi Simon,

Thanks for your reply.

What I ment was that the backup log file get's very big and when I
throw it away and created a new one, the backup sequence is then
broken.

But after reading your reply I figured out that I had to created
several backup log files at different points in time. That way, after
making a backup of the database, I can throw away 'old' backup log
files.

I hope understand it correct now? And I gone test this.

Best regards,
Marc,
:)
Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
"Simon Hayes" <sq*@hayes.ch> wrote in message news:<40**********@news.bluewin.ch>...
"deprins" <ma***@netlane.com> wrote in message
news:59*************************@posting.google.co m...
Hello,

I have run into some problems with logfiles and backup logfiles (MS
SQL server). I have read much about them but uptil now I dont seem to
grasp how it works. Specially the part of working with backup log
files.

Can someone please help me with this?

What I want todo is to create backup log files, so I can restore the
database to any point in time before a failure occured. But using this
method create's a problem with the backup log files. They get very
big.

So how can I use backup log files without getting to large backup log
files?

How can I shrink on a regular basis the backup log files and still be
able to restore the database?

Please help.

Best regards,

Marc Janssen,
ma***@no-spam-please.netlane.com
:)


Are you saying that your log backups (.BAK) are large, or that the log file
itself (.LDF) is too large? Assuming it's the backup files, then there
probably isn't much you can do - if the backups are large, that means a lot
of transactions are happening, so a lot of space is required to log them.
You could compress the backups on disk with a compression tool to save disk
space, but that would complicate a recovery. Depending on how long you need
to store the backups for, you might be able to use differential backups, and
then delete old log backups.

If you mean the log file itself is too large, then see here:

http://support.microsoft.com/default...&Product=sql2k

If this doesn't help, perhaps you can provide some more information - which
version of MSSQL, which recovery model are you using, what is your current
backup schedule, how big is the database and the backup files, etc.

Simon

Hi Simon,

Thanks for your reply.

What I ment was that the backup log file get's very big and when I
throw it away and created a new one, the backup sequence is then
broken.

But after reading your reply I figured out that I had to created
several backup log files at different points in time. That way, after
making a backup of the database, I can throw away 'old' backup log
files.

I hope understand it correct now? And I gone test this.

Best regards,
Marc,
:)
Jul 20 '05 #5

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