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UPDATE query in SQL Server

P: n/a
In VBA, I constructed the following to update all records in
tblmyTable with each records in tblmyTableTEMP having the same
UniqueID:

UPDATE
tblMyTable RIGHT JOIN tblMyTableTEMP ON tblMyTable.UniqueID =
tblMyTableTEMP.UniqueID
SET
tblMyTable.myField = tblMyTableTEMP.myField,
tblMyTable.myField2 = tblMyTableTEMP.myField2,
tblMyTable.myField3 = tblMyTableTEMP.myField3

How is this done in a SQL Server Stored Procedure?
Any help is appreciated.
lq
Jul 20 '05 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
Lauren,
That's an interesting update. I've never done an update with a JOIN in
it before and, out of curiosity, I tried to make it work, but was
unsuccessful.
The way I would normally do this in an SP would be like this:

create procedure update_mytable as
begin
UPDATE tblMyTable
set myField = (select t.myField from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID),
myField2 = (select t.myField2 from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID),
myField3 = (select t.myField3 from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID)
end

Since my solution requires 3 trips to tblMyTableTemp, if anyone knows how to
do this update in a similar fashion to the way Lauren did it below, pls
advise. I'd love to add that to my "bag o' tricks".

Thanks and Hope that helps.
Chuck Conover
www.TechnicalVideos.net


"Lauren Quantrell" <la*************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:47**************************@posting.google.c om...
In VBA, I constructed the following to update all records in
tblmyTable with each records in tblmyTableTEMP having the same
UniqueID:

UPDATE
tblMyTable RIGHT JOIN tblMyTableTEMP ON tblMyTable.UniqueID =
tblMyTableTEMP.UniqueID
SET
tblMyTable.myField = tblMyTableTEMP.myField,
tblMyTable.myField2 = tblMyTableTEMP.myField2,
tblMyTable.myField3 = tblMyTableTEMP.myField3

How is this done in a SQL Server Stored Procedure?
Any help is appreciated.
lq

Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
Lauren Quantrell (la*************@hotmail.com) writes:
In VBA, I constructed the following to update all records in
tblmyTable with each records in tblmyTableTEMP having the same
UniqueID:

UPDATE
tblMyTable RIGHT JOIN tblMyTableTEMP ON tblMyTable.UniqueID =
tblMyTableTEMP.UniqueID
SET
tblMyTable.myField = tblMyTableTEMP.myField,
tblMyTable.myField2 = tblMyTableTEMP.myField2,
tblMyTable.myField3 = tblMyTableTEMP.myField3

How is this done in a SQL Server Stored Procedure?
Any help is appreciated.


UPDATE tblMyTable
SET myField = b.myField,
myField2 = b.myField2,
myField3 = b.myField3
FROM tblmyTable a
RIGHT JOIN tblMyTableTEMP b ON a.UniqueID = b.UniqueID

Here I'm using aliases, but this is not necessary. But I prefer using
aliases, as this reduces the amount of noice in the query coming from
the repeated table names.

But this query looks a bit funny. A LEFT JOIN would make sense. The
you would set the columns to NULL, if there is no match in
tblMyTableTEMP. But a RIGHT JOIN? I cannot see that you get the same
result from an inner join.

--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, so****@algonet.se

Books Online for SQL Server SP3 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinf...2000/books.asp
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
>> In VBA, I constructed the following to update all records in
MyTable with each records [sic] in MyTableTemp HAVING the same
uniqueid: <<

Read ISO-11179 so you'll stop putting "tbl-" in front of data element
names; yes, I know this sample code, but it really looks awful. Also,
I hope you know that a row is NOT a record, a column is NOT a field
and a table is NOT a file.

UPDATE
MyTable
RIGHT OUTER JOIN
MyTableTemp
ON MyTable.uniqueid = MyTableTemp.uniqueid
SET MyTable.myfield = MyTableTemp.myfield,
MyTable.myfield2 = MyTableTemp.myfield2,
MyTable.myfield3 = MyTableTemp.myfield3;

This makes no sense in Standard SQL and does not port to other
platforms. There is no FROM clause in a Standard SQL UPDATE
statement; it would make no sense. Other products (SQL Server, Sybase
and Ingres) also use the "UPDATE .. FROM" syntax, but with different
semantics. So it does not port, or even worse, when you do move it,
it trashes your database. Other programmers cannot read it and
maintaining it is harder. And when Microsoft decides to change it,
you will have to do a re-write. Remember the deprecated "*=" versus
"LEFT OUTER JOIN" conversions? The ALL predicate? CURRENT_TIMESTAMP?
Etc.?

The correct syntax for a searched update statement is

<update statement> ::=
UPDATE <table name>
SET <set clause list>
[WHERE <search condition>]

<set clause list> ::=
<set clause> [{ , <set clause> }...]

<set clause> ::= <object column> = <update source>

<update source> ::= <value expression> | NULL | DEFAULT

<object column> ::= <column name>

The UPDATE clause simply gives the name of the base table or updatable
view to be changed.

Notice that no correlation name or table expression is allowed in the
UPDATE clause; this is to avoid some self-referencing problems that
could occur. But it also follows the data model in Standard SQL. When
you give a table expression a correlation name, it is to act as if a
materialized table has been created in the database. That table then
is dropped at the end of the statement. If you allowed correlation
names or table expression in the UPDATE clause, you would be updating
the materialized table, which would then disappear and leave the base
table untouched.

The SET clause is a list of columns to be changed or made; the WHERE
clause tells the statement which rows to use. For this discussion, we
will assume the user doing the update has applicable UPDATE privileges
for each <object column>.

* The WHERE Clause

As mentioned, the most important thing to remember about the WHERE
clause is that it is optional. If there is no WHERE clause, all rows
in the table are changed. This is a common error; if you make it,
immediately execute a ROLLBACK statement.

All rows that test TRUE for the <search condition> are marked as a
subset and not as individual rows. It is also possible that this
subset will be empty. This subset is used to construct a new set of
rows that will be inserted into the table when the subset is deleted
from the table. Note that the empty subset is a valid update that
will fire declarative referential actions and triggers.

* The SET Clause

Each assignment in the <set clause list> is executed in parallel and
each SET clause changes all the qualified rows at once. Or at least
that is the theoretical model. In practice, implementations will
first mark all of the qualified rows in the table in one pass, using
the WHERE clause. If there were no problems, then the SQL engine
makes a copy of each marked row in working storage. Each SET clause
is executed based on the old row image and the results are put in the
new row image. Finally, the old rows are deleted and the new rows are
inserted. If an error occurs during all of this, then system does a
ROLLBACK, the table is left unchanged and the errors are reported.
This parallelism is not like what you find in a traditional
third-generation programming language, so it may be hard to learn.
This feature lets you write a statement that will swap the values in
two columns, thus:

UPDATE MyTable
SET a = b, b = a;

This is not the same thing as

BEGIN ATOMIC
UPDATE MyTable
SET a = b;
UPDATE MyTable
SET b = a;
END;

In the first UPDATE, columns a and b will swap values in each row. In
the second pair of UPDATEs, column a will get all of the values of
column b in each row. In the second UPDATE of the pair, a, which now
has the same value as the original value of b, will be written back
into column b -- no change at all. There are some limits as to what
the value expression can be. The same column cannot appear more than
once in a <set clause list> -- which makes sense, given the parallel
nature of the statement. Since both go into effect at the same time,
you would not know which SET clause to use.

If a subquery expression is used in a <set clause>, and it returns a
single value, the result set is cast to a scalar; if it returns an
empty, the result set is cast to a NULL; if it returns multiple rows,
a cardinality violation is raised.

In SQL-92, you could use a row constructor:

UPDATE MyTable
SET ROW (myfield, myfield2, myfield3)
= (SELECT myfield, myfield2, myfield3
FROM MyTableTemp
WHERE MyTable.uniqueid = MyTableTemp.uniqueid);

But in SQL Server, you have to use

UPDATE MyTable
SET myfield
= (SELECT myfield, myfield2, myfield3
FROM MyTableTemp
WHERE MyTable.uniqueid = MyTableTemp.uniqueid),
myfield2
= (SELECT myfield2
FROM MyTableTemp
WHERE MyTable.uniqueid = MyTableTemp.uniqueid),
myfield3
= (SELECT myfield3
FROM MyTableTemp
WHERE MyTable.uniqueid = MyTableTemp.uniqueid);

Watch out for the fact that an empty scalar query will become a NULL.
Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
Chuck,
I did find a solution for your bag of tricks:

Alter Procedure "mySPName"
As
set nocount on
UPDATE
tblName
SET
tblName.FieldOne = tblNameTEMP.FieldOne,
tblName.FieldTwo = tblNameTEMP.FieldTwo,
tblName.FieldThree = tblNameTEMP.FieldThree,
FROM
tblNameTEMP
WHERE
tblName.UniqueID = tblNameTEMP.UniqueID
lq


"Chuck Conover" <cc******@commspeed.net> wrote in message news:<10***************@news.commspeed.net>...
Lauren,
That's an interesting update. I've never done an update with a JOIN in
it before and, out of curiosity, I tried to make it work, but was
unsuccessful.
The way I would normally do this in an SP would be like this:

create procedure update_mytable as
begin
UPDATE tblMyTable
set myField = (select t.myField from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID),
myField2 = (select t.myField2 from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID),
myField3 = (select t.myField3 from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID)
end

Since my solution requires 3 trips to tblMyTableTemp, if anyone knows how to
do this update in a similar fashion to the way Lauren did it below, pls
advise. I'd love to add that to my "bag o' tricks".

Thanks and Hope that helps.
Chuck Conover
www.TechnicalVideos.net


"Lauren Quantrell" <la*************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:47**************************@posting.google.c om...
In VBA, I constructed the following to update all records in
tblmyTable with each records in tblmyTableTEMP having the same
UniqueID:

UPDATE
tblMyTable RIGHT JOIN tblMyTableTEMP ON tblMyTable.UniqueID =
tblMyTableTEMP.UniqueID
SET
tblMyTable.myField = tblMyTableTEMP.myField,
tblMyTable.myField2 = tblMyTableTEMP.myField2,
tblMyTable.myField3 = tblMyTableTEMP.myField3

How is this done in a SQL Server Stored Procedure?
Any help is appreciated.
lq

Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
Erland,
This is what I ended up with:

Alter Procedure "mySPName"
As
set nocount on
UPDATE
tblName
SET
tblName.FieldOne = tblNameTEMP.FieldOne,
tblName.FieldTwo = tblNameTEMP.FieldTwo,
tblName.FieldThree = tblNameTEMP.FieldThree,
FROM
tblNameTEMP
WHERE
tblName.UniqueID = tblNameTEMP.UniqueID

lq
Erland Sommarskog <so****@algonet.se> wrote in message news:<Xn********************@127.0.0.1>...
Lauren Quantrell (la*************@hotmail.com) writes:
In VBA, I constructed the following to update all records in
tblmyTable with each records in tblmyTableTEMP having the same
UniqueID:

UPDATE
tblMyTable RIGHT JOIN tblMyTableTEMP ON tblMyTable.UniqueID =
tblMyTableTEMP.UniqueID
SET
tblMyTable.myField = tblMyTableTEMP.myField,
tblMyTable.myField2 = tblMyTableTEMP.myField2,
tblMyTable.myField3 = tblMyTableTEMP.myField3

How is this done in a SQL Server Stored Procedure?
Any help is appreciated.


UPDATE tblMyTable
SET myField = b.myField,
myField2 = b.myField2,
myField3 = b.myField3
FROM tblmyTable a
RIGHT JOIN tblMyTableTEMP b ON a.UniqueID = b.UniqueID

Here I'm using aliases, but this is not necessary. But I prefer using
aliases, as this reduces the amount of noice in the query coming from
the repeated table names.

But this query looks a bit funny. A LEFT JOIN would make sense. The
you would set the columns to NULL, if there is no match in
tblMyTableTEMP. But a RIGHT JOIN? I cannot see that you get the same
result from an inner join.

Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
> UPDATE tblMyTable
set myField = (select t.myField from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID),
myField2 = (select t.myField2 from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID),
myField3 = (select t.myField3 from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID) Since my solution requires 3 trips to tblMyTableTemp


Doesn't SQL Server support...

UPDATE tblMyTable
set (myField, myField2, myFeld3) = (select t.myField, t.myField2, t.myField3
from tblMyTableTemp t
where t.UniqueID = tblMyTable.UniqueID)
where exists (select *
from tblMyTableTemp t1
where t1.UniqueID = tblMyTable.UniqueID);
Christian.
Jul 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
Christian,
No, that one doesn't work.
Regards,
Chuck Conover
www.TechnicalVideos.net

"Christian Maslen" <ch**************@techie.com> wrote in message
news:b9**************************@posting.google.c om...
UPDATE tblMyTable
set myField = (select t.myField from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID = tblMyTable.UniqueID),
myField2 = (select t.myField2 from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID),
myField3 = (select t.myField3 from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID)
Since my solution requires 3 trips to tblMyTableTemp


Doesn't SQL Server support...

UPDATE tblMyTable
set (myField, myField2, myFeld3) = (select t.myField, t.myField2,

t.myField3 from tblMyTableTemp t
where t.UniqueID = tblMyTable.UniqueID) where exists (select *
from tblMyTableTemp t1
where t1.UniqueID = tblMyTable.UniqueID);
Christian.

Jul 20 '05 #8

P: n/a
Lauren,
Thanks. I tried that and it works great. It also only accesses each
table once, so it's a good solution.
Thanks and Best Regards,
Chuck Conover
www.TechnicalVideos.net

"Lauren Quantrell" <la*************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:47**************************@posting.google.c om...
Chuck,
I did find a solution for your bag of tricks:

Alter Procedure "mySPName"
As
set nocount on
UPDATE
tblName
SET
tblName.FieldOne = tblNameTEMP.FieldOne,
tblName.FieldTwo = tblNameTEMP.FieldTwo,
tblName.FieldThree = tblNameTEMP.FieldThree,
FROM
tblNameTEMP
WHERE
tblName.UniqueID = tblNameTEMP.UniqueID
lq


"Chuck Conover" <cc******@commspeed.net> wrote in message

news:<10***************@news.commspeed.net>...
Lauren,
That's an interesting update. I've never done an update with a JOIN in it before and, out of curiosity, I tried to make it work, but was
unsuccessful.
The way I would normally do this in an SP would be like this:

create procedure update_mytable as
begin
UPDATE tblMyTable
set myField = (select t.myField from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID = tblMyTable.UniqueID),
myField2 = (select t.myField2 from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID),
myField3 = (select t.myField3 from tblMyTableTemp t where t.UniqueID =
tblMyTable.UniqueID)
end

Since my solution requires 3 trips to tblMyTableTemp, if anyone knows how to do this update in a similar fashion to the way Lauren did it below, pls
advise. I'd love to add that to my "bag o' tricks".

Thanks and Hope that helps.
Chuck Conover
www.TechnicalVideos.net


"Lauren Quantrell" <la*************@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:47**************************@posting.google.c om...
In VBA, I constructed the following to update all records in
tblmyTable with each records in tblmyTableTEMP having the same
UniqueID:

UPDATE
tblMyTable RIGHT JOIN tblMyTableTEMP ON tblMyTable.UniqueID =
tblMyTableTEMP.UniqueID
SET
tblMyTable.myField = tblMyTableTEMP.myField,
tblMyTable.myField2 = tblMyTableTEMP.myField2,
tblMyTable.myField3 = tblMyTableTEMP.myField3

How is this done in a SQL Server Stored Procedure?
Any help is appreciated.
lq

Jul 20 '05 #9

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