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Large table/slow query/ can performance be improved?

P: n/a
I am having performance issues on a SQL query in Access. My query is
accessing and joining several tables (one very large one). The tables are
linked ODBC. The client submits the query to the server, separated by
several states. It appears the query is retrieving gigs of data from the
table and processing the joins on the client. Is there away to perform more
of the work on the server there by minimizing the amount of extraneous table
data moving across the network and improving performance (woefully slow
about 6 hours)?
Jul 20 '05 #1
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"Robert" <st*******@whitehouse.gov> wrote in message
news:HL********@news.boeing.com...
I am having performance issues on a SQL query in Access. My query is
accessing and joining several tables (one very large one). The tables are
linked ODBC. The client submits the query to the server, separated by
several states. It appears the query is retrieving gigs of data from the
table and processing the joins on the client. Is there away to perform more of the work on the server there by minimizing the amount of extraneous table data moving across the network and improving performance (woefully slow
about 6 hours)?
Hmm, I haven't touched Access in years, but I recall it supporting what I
think it called Pass Thru Queries?

Or another option (perhaps ultimately your best one) is rewrite it as a
stored proc on the server.

If it's taking 6 hours, unless you're joining multigig table and doing
something like outer joins, I've got to imagine you're right, it's Access
trying to process things locally.


Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hi,

These are some tips from my side.

1. Put indexes on column that is frequently used in query. This will
help database engine to search data quickly.
2. If the Recordset has less than 500 records, then the snapshot
Recordset will be faster than the dynaset Recordset.
3. Make query selection/criteria so as resultset will be small.
Finally, can you elaborate/post what exactly u r trying to do and
achive.

Amit


"Robert" <st*******@whitehouse.gov> wrote in message news:<HL********@news.boeing.com>...
I am having performance issues on a SQL query in Access. My query is
accessing and joining several tables (one very large one). The tables are
linked ODBC. The client submits the query to the server, separated by
several states. It appears the query is retrieving gigs of data from the
table and processing the joins on the client. Is there away to perform more
of the work on the server there by minimizing the amount of extraneous table
data moving across the network and improving performance (woefully slow
about 6 hours)?

Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
As long as you're not using any client-side functions (Access or user-defined),
you should be able to make this into a Pass-Through query.

1) Copy the SQL Statement to the clipboard (or better yet, to Notepad)

2) In Access, make a new query, but don't choose any tables.

3) Choose Query/SQL Specific>Pass-Through

4) Paste the SQL Statement in there

5) Choose View/Properties

6) Set the Connect string (and ODBC Timeout!) appropriately

Run the query.

I have never seen an Access query take 6 hours to run...and I have an Access
database linked to over 68 MILLION records. Admittedly, I would never even WAIT
that long to find out if it could ever complete!

The slowest Access queries I've seen are the ones that I call "Query of a query
of a query...etc." with all records included the whole time, and a criteria at
the end; especially if Access or user-defined (VBA) function are invovled!

You really should learn the advantages of SQL Server's "SQL langauange" vs
Access. My favorite example is the FULL OUTER JOIN...with one statement in SQL
Server you get both sets of records from the eaither side of join whether or
not they match...can't do that in Access without making three queries! (OUTER,
Non-Match OUTER, then UNION)

Althogh the IIF in Access is convenient, it insists on evaluating both
outcomes...SQL Server's "CASE" construct makes much more sense.

If your query DOES use Access and/or user-defined VBA Functions, then you
should have the whole process converted to a stored procedure, and the use a
Pass-Through query to call the Stored Procedure. In all seriousness, EVERY
query you need should be converted to paramaterized Stored Procedures, and
called via Pass-Through....this is the best way to optimize performance.

CAVEAT: Pass-Through queries cannot be used as record sources for
linkchild/master situations (That's a JET-only feature), but you can always
program the same functionality yourself!

I'd be interested in seeing the SQL Statement of the 6-hr query.
Jul 20 '05 #4

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