469,568 Members | 1,501 Online
Bytes | Developer Community
New Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Post your question to a community of 469,568 developers. It's quick & easy.

SQL-2000 GUI

Good morning:

At least it's morning where I am. :)

I have a rather newbie question I'm afraid. I have VisualStudio.NET, and
have installed it along with SQL server. However I can't seem to find an
administration front-end to SQL, other than the VisualStudio, which is
ok for creating databases and adding tables/columns. However when I go
to generate create script, I'm told that I need client tools.

I've installed everything from the cd's - am I missing something very
obvious, and/or how does one import scripts?

Thanks for reading.

--
Regards
================================================== =========================
Try to get all of your posthumous medals in advance.
Jul 20 '05 #1
10 6402
Hi.. We can generate scripts of objects in SQL server using Enterprise
Manager.

For more info refer the following link

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de.../en-us/entrmgr
/agent_067n.asp

Thanx
Srinivas Sampangi

*** Sent via Developersdex http://www.developersdex.com ***
Don't just participate in USENET...get rewarded for it!
Jul 20 '05 #2
Dagwood ("Dagwood Bumstead"@antionline.com) writes:
Good morning:

At least it's morning where I am. :)
Good Evening to you! :-)
I have a rather newbie question I'm afraid. I have VisualStudio.NET, and
have installed it along with SQL server. However I can't seem to find an
administration front-end to SQL, other than the VisualStudio, which is
ok for creating databases and adding tables/columns. However when I go
to generate create script, I'm told that I need client tools.

I've installed everything from the cd's - am I missing something very
obvious, and/or how does one import scripts?


With VS.Net you get MSDE, and MSDE does not come with any other
administration tools than OSQL which is a command-line tool. To get
the fancy stuff, you need to buy an SQL Server license.

But don't despair. MS has announced that from Aug 1st the price for
Developer Edition will be slashed to 49 USD. (The current price is
about 10 as high.) In the mean while, you can download the Evaluation
Edition of SQL Server from www.microsoft.com/sql. It is good for 120
days.

--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, so****@algonet.se

Books Online for SQL Server SP3 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinf...2000/books.asp
Jul 20 '05 #3
In comp.databases.ms-sqlserver, Srinivas Sampangi wrote:
Hi.. We can generate scripts of objects in SQL server using Enterprise
Manager. For more info refer the following link http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de.../en-us/entrmgr
/agent_067n.asp

Hi Srinivas:

Thanks for the link (I've bookmarked it) - however, my main issue is
that I can't find Enterprise Manager -- I have VisualStudio.NET 5 cd's
in total. (SQL 2000 comes with it) I installed *everything*, but I can't
find Enterprise Manager. I even went back to the cd's, to see if I could
update the install, there isn't anything to update.

So, after creating my db/tables in VisualStudio, I now wish to run these
scripts to populate the tables, as it's too much data to enter by hand.

Suggestions?

--
Regards
================================================== =========================
You should emulate your heros, but don't carry it too far. Especially
if they are dead.
Jul 20 '05 #4
In comp.databases.ms-sqlserver, Erland Sommarskog wrote:
Dagwood ("Dagwood Bumstead"@antionline.com) writes:
Good morning: At least it's morning where I am. :)
Good Evening to you! :-)
Evening.
I have a rather newbie question I'm afraid. I have VisualStudio.NET, and
have installed it along with SQL server. However I can't seem to find an
administration front-end to SQL, other than the VisualStudio, which is
ok for creating databases and adding tables/columns. However when I go
to generate create script, I'm told that I need client tools. I've installed everything from the cd's - am I missing something very
obvious, and/or how does one import scripts?

With VS.Net you get MSDE, and MSDE does not come with any other
administration tools than OSQL which is a command-line tool. To get
the fancy stuff, you need to buy an SQL Server license.
Hmm, well I have an SQL server with SQL service manager, is this MSDE?
What does the acronymn MSDE stand for?

I don't mind using a term and CLI, but I can use VStudio can I not for
this, in terms of importing data? I've already created the database and
tables...
But don't despair. MS has announced that from Aug 1st the price for
Developer Edition will be slashed to 49 USD. (The current price is
about 10 as high.) In the mean while, you can download the Evaluation
Edition of SQL Server from www.microsoft.com/sql. It is good for 120
days.


Amazing that one would need to pay for the developer edition -- don't
developers encourage the use of products by third parties? ;)

Thanks for responding.

--
Regards
================================================== =========================
Be careful of reading health books, you might die of a misprint.
-- Mark Twain
Jul 20 '05 #5
Dagwood ("Dagwood Bumstead"@antionline.com) writes:
Hmm, well I have an SQL server with SQL service manager, is this MSDE?
What does the acronymn MSDE stand for?
MSDE is the desktop edition of MS SQL Server. It comes with a bunch of
products, VS and Office Developer are two examples. You can also build
an application that uses MSDE and redistribute freely.
I don't mind using a term and CLI, but I can use VStudio can I not for
this, in terms of importing data? I've already created the database and
tables...


If the command-lines are there, you should have BCP as well. That's
good for import. If you have MSDN Library, you should have all SQL
documentation there. Else, check my signature.

--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, so****@algonet.se

Books Online for SQL Server SP3 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinf...2000/books.asp
Jul 20 '05 #6
In comp.databases.ms-sqlserver, Erland Sommarskog wrote:
Dagwood ("Dagwood Bumstead"@antionline.com) writes:
Hmm, well I have an SQL server with SQL service manager, is this MSDE?
What does the acronymn MSDE stand for?
MSDE is the desktop edition of MS SQL Server. It comes with a bunch of
products, VS and Office Developer are two examples. You can also build
an application that uses MSDE and redistribute freely. I don't mind using a term and CLI, but I can use VStudio can I not for
this, in terms of importing data? I've already created the database and
tables...

If the command-lines are there, you should have BCP as well. That's
good for import. If you have MSDN Library, you should have all SQL
documentation there. Else, check my signature.


Ok thanks, (I apologize in advance for being thick headed), but you
haven't really answered my question. First, what I've got is NOT called
MSDE, I don't have anything on my install disk or on my hard drive
called that. It says SQL server, explicitly. You're saying that MSDE is
NOT referred to as SQL server or is? Why would it be called SQL server,
if in fact it isn't MS-SQL? Second, if one can create tables in
VisualStudio, surely one can import data -- is this too far fetched, or
am I totally off base here, without using a terminal? I use a terminal,
but I'm trying to figure out why I need VisualStudio.NET, as I have
independent apps that I use in WebDevelopment, I'm not an application
developer, I simply create dynamic websites.

I guess I should go back to PostreSQL, at least I have the whole
application.

--
Regards
================================================== =========================
You have been selected for a secret mission.
Jul 20 '05 #7
I'm don't know what version/edition of VS.NET you have but it may come
with Server Explorer. This IDE tool provides much of the functionality
as the SQL Server GUI tools but with a developer focus. If installed,
you can launch it from within your IDE via the View menu.

SQL Server 2000 comes in 5 editions, including SQL Server 2000 Desktop
Engine. MSDE was renamed the SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine. You can
peruse the white paper at
<http://www.microsoft.com/sql/techinfo/planning/SQLResKChooseEd.asp> to
see the differences. A couple of relevant excerpts:

<Excerpt>
The SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine does not include graphical management
tools; the application distributing the engine is usually coded to
perform any needed database administration. You can manage instances of
the Desktop Engine from the SQL Server 2000 graphical tools if installed
with another edition of SQL Server.
</ Excerpt>

<Excerpt>
SQL Server 2000 Developer Edition
This edition allows developers to build any type of application on top
of SQL Server. It includes all of the functionality of Enterprise
Edition but with a special development and test end-user license
agreement (EULA) that prohibits production deployment (for complete
details, see the SQL Server 2000 Developer Edition EULA at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql.
</ Excerpt>

I believe the SQL Server 2000 Developer Edition (which includes GUI
tools) is included with MSDN Enterprise and Universal subscriptions. If
you VS.NET installation is part of those MSDN subscriptions, you are
licensed to use the SQL Developer edition from your MSDN media. SQL
Server 2000 Developer edition can also be purchased separately.

--
Hope this helps.

Dan Guzman
SQL Server MVP

-----------------------
SQL FAQ links (courtesy Neil Pike):

http://www.ntfaq.com/Articles/Index....partmentID=800
http://www.sqlserverfaq.com
http://www.mssqlserver.com/faq
-----------------------

"Dagwood" <"Dagwood Bumstead"@antionline.com> wrote in message
news:sl****************************@3D.AliasWavefr ont.ca...
In comp.databases.ms-sqlserver, Erland Sommarskog wrote:
Dagwood ("Dagwood Bumstead"@antionline.com) writes:
Hmm, well I have an SQL server with SQL service manager, is this MSDE? What does the acronymn MSDE stand for?
MSDE is the desktop edition of MS SQL Server. It comes with a bunch of products, VS and Office Developer are two examples. You can also build an application that uses MSDE and redistribute freely. I don't mind using a term and CLI, but I can use VStudio can I not for this, in terms of importing data? I've already created the database and tables...

If the command-lines are there, you should have BCP as well. That's
good for import. If you have MSDN Library, you should have all SQL
documentation there. Else, check my signature.


Ok thanks, (I apologize in advance for being thick headed), but you
haven't really answered my question. First, what I've got is NOT

called MSDE, I don't have anything on my install disk or on my hard drive
called that. It says SQL server, explicitly. You're saying that MSDE is NOT referred to as SQL server or is? Why would it be called SQL server, if in fact it isn't MS-SQL? Second, if one can create tables in
VisualStudio, surely one can import data -- is this too far fetched, or am I totally off base here, without using a terminal? I use a terminal, but I'm trying to figure out why I need VisualStudio.NET, as I have
independent apps that I use in WebDevelopment, I'm not an application
developer, I simply create dynamic websites.

I guess I should go back to PostreSQL, at least I have the whole
application.

--
Regards
================================================== ======================
=== You have been selected for a secret mission.

Jul 20 '05 #8
Which version of VS did you get? Vs Enterprise and above should contain a
copy of SQL Server developer edition. This should have installed a separate
program group which contains EM and other tools.

Search your machine for isqlw.exe, this is one of the graphical tools. If
its not there then go back to the SQL Server CD thats part of the VS install
and re-run the installer, making sure you select client components.

"Dagwood" <"Dagwood Bumstead"@antionline.com> wrote in message
news:sl****************************@3D.AliasWavefr ont.ca...
In comp.databases.ms-sqlserver, Erland Sommarskog wrote:
Dagwood ("Dagwood Bumstead"@antionline.com) writes:
Hmm, well I have an SQL server with SQL service manager, is this MSDE?
What does the acronymn MSDE stand for?
MSDE is the desktop edition of MS SQL Server. It comes with a bunch of
products, VS and Office Developer are two examples. You can also build
an application that uses MSDE and redistribute freely. I don't mind using a term and CLI, but I can use VStudio can I not for
this, in terms of importing data? I've already created the database and
tables...

If the command-lines are there, you should have BCP as well. That's
good for import. If you have MSDN Library, you should have all SQL
documentation there. Else, check my signature.


Ok thanks, (I apologize in advance for being thick headed), but you
haven't really answered my question. First, what I've got is NOT called
MSDE, I don't have anything on my install disk or on my hard drive
called that. It says SQL server, explicitly. You're saying that MSDE is
NOT referred to as SQL server or is? Why would it be called SQL server,
if in fact it isn't MS-SQL? Second, if one can create tables in
VisualStudio, surely one can import data -- is this too far fetched, or
am I totally off base here, without using a terminal? I use a terminal,
but I'm trying to figure out why I need VisualStudio.NET, as I have
independent apps that I use in WebDevelopment, I'm not an application
developer, I simply create dynamic websites.

I guess I should go back to PostreSQL, at least I have the whole
application.

--
Regards

================================================== ========================= You have been selected for a secret mission.

Jul 20 '05 #9
In comp.databases.ms-sqlserver, Daniel Bush wrote:
On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 11:06:20 -0400, Dagwood <"Dagwood
Bumstead"@antionline.com> wrote:
[snip]
I guess I should go back to PostreSQL, at least I have the whole
application.

What MSDE is is a sort of SQL Server Light - it has nearly all of the
functionality of SQL Server (with a limited number of allowable
concurrent connections) but none of the fancy GUI tools. It is
intended to be a redistributable version of SQL Server: Microsoft
allows it to be distributed free with applications. So, as a
developer, you can actually distribute applications with their own
little SQL Server engine. To protect their marketability of the full
version of SQL Server, they don't give you all the tools or the GUI.
However, with the command line interface, you can replicate a
surprising percentage of the full version. Personally, I think it was
a pretty cool thing that Microsoft did - it is a more robust solution
for single user database apps than using Access mdb's, anyway. You
*do* have the whole version of MSDE - it is just a "light" version of
SQL Server, though I would agree it is not nearly as convenient to
use.


Great, thanks a lot Dan, appreciate the info, and thanks to everyone
else as well.

[snip]

--
Regards
================================================== =========================
Q: What's buried in Grant's tomb?
A: A corpse.
Jul 20 '05 #10
In comp.databases.ms-sqlserver, Carlos Fandango wrote:
Which version of VS did you get? Vs Enterprise and above should contain a
copy of SQL Server developer edition. This should have installed a separate
program group which contains EM and other tools. Search your machine for isqlw.exe, this is one of the graphical tools. If
its not there then go back to the SQL Server CD thats part of the VS install
and re-run the installer, making sure you select client components.


Great info -- no I don't have it, neither is there 'client tools' on the
disks. So, it appears I have MSDE. Now, I'm confident that I don't,
prior, I wasn't 100% sure.

Thanks!

--
Regards
================================================== =========================
Don't Worry, Be Happy.
-- Meher Baba
Jul 20 '05 #11

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.

Similar topics

2 posts views Thread by Peter | last post: by
9 posts views Thread by Grim Reaper | last post: by
6 posts views Thread by Fuzzydave | last post: by
reply views Thread by suresh191 | last post: by
4 posts views Thread by guiromero | last post: by
By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.