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SQL Server 2005 Licensing concern.

P: n/a
Hello,

Our company has developed several Access applications for our clients
and we wish to expand to use a database server. We wish to use Access
as the front end application and SQL Server 2005 as the back end
Databes Server. Making a Server-Client application database.

I'm very new to SQL Server so my concern is how the licensing works
for a developer like us. I am aware that we can purchase the Developer
edition for $49 USD. Our clients will then have to purchase a their
respective licensing option.

We do not have an issue with this, but i would like a better
understanding of how this works.

1) The developer edition (DE) is the same as the Enterprise edition.
Would our clients have to buy the Enterprise edition ($24,999) if we
develop the SQL server in the DE? Or can they purchase the Standard
or Workgroup edition if the workload allows it?

2) If the client already has the Enterprise Edition on the Server we
wish to use, will they have to buy the license again if we create the
Database? Can they import our Database to thier SQL Server, and our
application connects to thiers?

3) Is there other options that would require a cheaper option for our
clients?

4) With just the DE, can we develope applications and use the
appropriate edition for our clients whatever it is?

5) To test our products we thought of using the Trial version to
simulate a multi-user test environment? Since thats just a 180 day
trial, perhaps the Worgroup Edition or the Light weight Edition might
work. But these editions might not be compatible with our clients'
requirements. The DE doesn't seem to handle multi-user environments,
so we cant effectively test how the application will perform in the
"real world". Any advices here?

Our clients range from small bussiness to nation-wide to multi-
national companies.

Thanks,

- GL
Mar 5 '08 #1
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14 Replies


P: n/a
Others will be able to answer your questions more fully. But I just wanted
to note that I develop in MS-Access, using a SQL Server back end. I use the
developer edition to develop and maintain the database on my development
machine, and the client has a sister copy of the database on their server.
There are no licensing issues related to creating the database on one
machine and copying it to another. As long as the client has a licensed copy
of SQL Server that is sufficient for their needs, that's all you have to
worry about. You can use the DE to develop the database, and then have the
client use whatever version they have.

Re. "Can they import our Database to thier SQL Server, and our application
connects to thiers?" You can; but I don't think that's the best approach.
Better would be to have a sister setup on your development machine for
development and testing, and have the ability to connect to the client's
system via PCAnywhere or Remote Desktop or other to be able to install,
test, and maintain their system.

Hope that helps a little.

Neil

"Guillermo_Lopez" <g.*****@iesdr.comwrote in message
news:32**********************************@e6g2000p rf.googlegroups.com...
Hello,

Our company has developed several Access applications for our clients
and we wish to expand to use a database server. We wish to use Access
as the front end application and SQL Server 2005 as the back end
Databes Server. Making a Server-Client application database.

I'm very new to SQL Server so my concern is how the licensing works
for a developer like us. I am aware that we can purchase the Developer
edition for $49 USD. Our clients will then have to purchase a their
respective licensing option.

We do not have an issue with this, but i would like a better
understanding of how this works.

1) The developer edition (DE) is the same as the Enterprise edition.
Would our clients have to buy the Enterprise edition ($24,999) if we
develop the SQL server in the DE? Or can they purchase the Standard
or Workgroup edition if the workload allows it?

2) If the client already has the Enterprise Edition on the Server we
wish to use, will they have to buy the license again if we create the
Database? Can they import our Database to thier SQL Server, and our
application connects to thiers?

3) Is there other options that would require a cheaper option for our
clients?

4) With just the DE, can we develope applications and use the
appropriate edition for our clients whatever it is?

5) To test our products we thought of using the Trial version to
simulate a multi-user test environment? Since thats just a 180 day
trial, perhaps the Worgroup Edition or the Light weight Edition might
work. But these editions might not be compatible with our clients'
requirements. The DE doesn't seem to handle multi-user environments,
so we cant effectively test how the application will perform in the
"real world". Any advices here?

Our clients range from small bussiness to nation-wide to multi-
national companies.

Thanks,

- GL

Mar 5 '08 #2

P: n/a
"Guillermo_Lopez" <g.*****@iesdr.comwrote in message
news:32**********************************@e6g2000p rf.googlegroups.com...
Hello,

Our company has developed several Access applications for our clients
and we wish to expand to use a database server. We wish to use Access
as the front end application and SQL Server 2005 as the back end
Databes Server. Making a Server-Client application database.

I'm very new to SQL Server so my concern is how the licensing works
for a developer like us. I am aware that we can purchase the Developer
edition for $49 USD. Our clients will then have to purchase a their
respective licensing option.

We do not have an issue with this, but i would like a better
understanding of how this works.

1) The developer edition (DE) is the same as the Enterprise edition.
Would our clients have to buy the Enterprise edition ($24,999) if we
develop the SQL server in the DE? Or can they purchase the Standard
or Workgroup edition if the workload allows it?

2) If the client already has the Enterprise Edition on the Server we
wish to use, will they have to buy the license again if we create the
Database? Can they import our Database to thier SQL Server, and our
application connects to thiers?

3) Is there other options that would require a cheaper option for our
clients?

4) With just the DE, can we develope applications and use the
appropriate edition for our clients whatever it is?

5) To test our products we thought of using the Trial version to
simulate a multi-user test environment? Since thats just a 180 day
trial, perhaps the Worgroup Edition or the Light weight Edition might
work. But these editions might not be compatible with our clients'
requirements. The DE doesn't seem to handle multi-user environments,
so we cant effectively test how the application will perform in the
"real world". Any advices here?

Our clients range from small bussiness to nation-wide to multi-
national companies.

Thanks,

- GL

The client can use whatever edition suits your application and their needs.
It's the client's repsonsibility to ensure they are properly licensed. The
cheapest is Express Edition (free to acquire).
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/howtobuy/licensing.mspx

I don't know why you think that DE doesn't handle "multi-user environments".
DE can do everything that Enterprise can do. DE is licensed per developer
and is very suitable for test purposes. The only problem comes if you want
to test against a Standard or Workgroup install because there is no Standard
or Workgroup equivalent of DE (the Trial edition is equivalent to a
time-limited version of DE). I think your cheapest option for a Standard or
Workgroup test environment is to get an MSDN subscription, which gives you
all the editions.

--
David Portas
Mar 5 '08 #3

P: n/a
On Mar 5, 5:42*pm, "David Portas"
<REMOVE_BEFORE_REPLYING_dpor...@acm.orgwrote:
"Guillermo_Lopez" <g.lo...@iesdr.comwrote in message

news:32**********************************@e6g2000p rf.googlegroups.com...


Hello,
Our company has developed several Access applications for our clients
and we wish to expand to use a database server. We wish to use Access
as the front end application and SQL Server 2005 as the back end
Databes Server. Making a Server-Client application database.
I'm very new to SQL Server so my concern is how the licensing works
for a developer like us. I am aware that we can purchase the Developer
edition for $49 USD. Our clients will then have to purchase a their
respective licensing option.
We do not have an issue with this, but i would like a better
understanding of how this works.
1) The developer edition (DE) is the same as the Enterprise edition.
Would our clients have to buy the Enterprise edition ($24,999) if we
develop the SQL server in the DE? *Or can they purchase the Standard
or Workgroup edition if the workload allows it?
2) If the client already has the Enterprise Edition on the Server we
wish to use, will they have to buy the license again if we create the
Database? Can they import our Database to thier SQL Server, and our
application connects to thiers?
3) Is there other options that would require a cheaper option for our
clients?
4) With just the DE, can we develope applications and use the
appropriate edition for our clients whatever it is?
5) To test our products we thought of using the Trial version to
simulate a multi-user test environment? Since thats just a 180 day
trial, perhaps the Worgroup Edition or the Light weight Edition might
work. But these editions might not be compatible with our clients'
requirements. The DE doesn't seem to handle multi-user environments,
so we cant effectively test how the application will perform in the
"real world". Any advices here?
Our clients range from small bussiness to nation-wide to multi-
national companies.
Thanks,
- GL

The client can use whatever edition suits your application and their needs..
It's the client's repsonsibility to ensure they are properly licensed. The
cheapest is Express Edition (free to acquire).http://www.microsoft.com/sql/howtobuy/licensing.mspx

I don't know why you think that DE doesn't handle "multi-user environments".
DE can do everything that Enterprise can do. DE is licensed per developer
and is very suitable for test purposes. The only problem comes if you want
to test against a Standard or Workgroup install because there is no Standard
or Workgroup equivalent of DE (the Trial edition is equivalent to a
time-limited version of DE). I think your cheapest option for a Standard or
Workgroup test environment is to get an MSDN subscription, which gives you
all the editions.

--
David Portas- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Thaks for the quick reply both of you. This is pretty much what I
expected, but i needed to clarify some things that weren't said on the
MicroSoft sales pitch.

Its not that I dont think that the DE can't handled multi user
environment. Since we will only license one DE that means that one one
of us can use it at a time. So we wouldn't be able to test how the
application and SQL server responses to several users at the same
time. However, this seems like a non-issue, and I'm sure there are
work-arounds for this.

Thanks

- GL
Mar 5 '08 #4

P: n/a
Actually the Dev licence is per developer or tester no matter how many
installs or how many are connected concurrently. Nothing to stop you running
hundreds of copies provided your devs and testers are licensed. That's my
interpretation but see:
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/howtobuy/development.mspx

--
David Portas
Mar 5 '08 #5

P: n/a
Guillermo_Lopez (g.*****@iesdr.com) writes:
Thaks for the quick reply both of you. This is pretty much what I
expected, but i needed to clarify some things that weren't said on the
MicroSoft sales pitch.

Its not that I dont think that the DE can't handled multi user
environment. Since we will only license one DE that means that one one
of us can use it at a time. So we wouldn't be able to test how the
application and SQL server responses to several users at the same
time. However, this seems like a non-issue, and I'm sure there are
work-arounds for this.
I will have to admit that I have mostly slept over the fine details
of the licenses. But I would be very surprised if the DevEdition did
not permit multiple users to connect. Else how would a shop be able
to have a common development database?

The main problem I see with DevEdition is that you may inadvertently
use features that are not available in Standard or Workgroup edition.
A simple and cheap way out is to test against SQL Express which is
free. Of course, this presumes that you don't need features unavailable
in Express.
--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server 2005 at
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...ads/books.mspx
Books Online for SQL Server 2000 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinf...ons/books.mspx
Mar 5 '08 #6

P: n/a
If the DE allowed multiple users than companies just had to buy one
$49 server and use that. And I know thats can't work.

As far as the features. My guess will be to understand what features
each edition has and programmed carefully based on that. If thats the
case, I'm guessing that a Database developed using the DE will work ok
in the Standard/Express/Workgroup editions.

On Mar 5, 6:06*pm, Erland Sommarskog <esq...@sommarskog.sewrote:
Guillermo_Lopez (g.lo...@iesdr.com) writes:
Thaks for the quick reply both of you. This is pretty much what I
expected, but i needed to clarify some things that weren't said on the
MicroSoft sales pitch.
Its not that I dont think that the DE can't handled multi user
environment. Since we will only license one DE that means that one one
of us can use it at a time. So we wouldn't be able to test how the
application and SQL server responses to several users at the same
time. However, this seems like a non-issue, and I'm sure there are
work-arounds for this.

I will have to admit that I have mostly slept over the fine details
of the licenses. But I would be very surprised if the DevEdition did
not permit multiple users to connect. Else how would a shop be able
to have a common development database?

The main problem I see with DevEdition is that you may inadvertently
use features that are not available in Standard or Workgroup edition.
A simple and cheap way out is to test against SQL Express which is
free. Of course, this presumes that you don't need features unavailable
in Express.

--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esq...@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server 2005 athttp://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/sql/2005/downloads/books...
Books Online for SQL Server 2000 athttp://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinfo/previousversions/books.mspx
Mar 5 '08 #7

P: n/a
In place of spending the $49, I downloaded the free "express" edition of sql
server.

Your clients can do the above also, and it not cost them a dime....

The free express editions can be found here:
about:
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/edition...s/default.mspx

Note that the free express visual studio tools are REALLY REALLY nice, and
even has stuff like lunching the query builder in the middle of a stored
proc (just highlight the sql..right click).

Even more stunning is that the text indexing system is also now free, and
that for years was a big expensive add on for sql server.

You even get the relational diagramming tools etc. in the express studio. It
really amazing and nice..

I suspect that a ms-access newsgroup is not the best place to ask about sql
licensing. There is some links above. And, from what the above says, if you
looking to deploy an application with sql server, your customers for the
most part don't need to purchase sql server at all now....it is free...

To state that many of my fellow developers are not using this express
edition would be an understatement..

--
Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
Edmonton, Alberta Canada
pl*****************@msn.com

Mar 6 '08 #8

P: n/a
"Guillermo_Lopez" <g.*****@iesdr.comwrote in message
news:4b**********************************@m3g2000h sc.googlegroups.com...
If the DE allowed multiple users than companies just had to buy one
$49 server and use that. And I know thats can't work.
======================

DE allows multiple users. And note, it's $49 per developer.

The reason companies don't use DE in production environments is for legal
reasons, not technical.

======================

As far as the features. My guess will be to understand what features
each edition has and programmed carefully based on that. If thats the
case, I'm guessing that a Database developed using the DE will work ok
in the Standard/Express/Workgroup editions.

======================

MS has papers on this but generally the Enterprise Edition is focused on
High Availibility.

Pretty much you should be fine developing in DE and having it run on other
versions.
======================

--
Greg Moore
SQL Server DBA Consulting Remote and Onsite available!
Email: sql (at) greenms.com http://www.greenms.com/sqlserver.html
Mar 6 '08 #9

P: n/a
On Wed, 5 Mar 2008 13:19:40 -0800 (PST), Guillermo_Lopez
<g.*****@iesdr.comwrote:

In all the years of building SQL Server solutions for our clients,
I've used the Enterprise Edition only once.
Your clients can buy whatever version their workload allows, including
the free Express edition. The Standard edition on a $7K box really
flies.
Yes, the code for the various versions is interchangable, with few
exceptions. For example I understand the Express edition doesn't have
the full Reporting Services available.
Rebuilding a server machine every 180 days doesn't seem such a bad
trade-off. Of course you could also subscribe to MSDN and get some of
the bigger versions as part of your subscription.

-Tom.
>Hello,

Our company has developed several Access applications for our clients
and we wish to expand to use a database server. We wish to use Access
as the front end application and SQL Server 2005 as the back end
Databes Server. Making a Server-Client application database.

I'm very new to SQL Server so my concern is how the licensing works
for a developer like us. I am aware that we can purchase the Developer
edition for $49 USD. Our clients will then have to purchase a their
respective licensing option.

We do not have an issue with this, but i would like a better
understanding of how this works.

1) The developer edition (DE) is the same as the Enterprise edition.
Would our clients have to buy the Enterprise edition ($24,999) if we
develop the SQL server in the DE? Or can they purchase the Standard
or Workgroup edition if the workload allows it?

2) If the client already has the Enterprise Edition on the Server we
wish to use, will they have to buy the license again if we create the
Database? Can they import our Database to thier SQL Server, and our
application connects to thiers?

3) Is there other options that would require a cheaper option for our
clients?

4) With just the DE, can we develope applications and use the
appropriate edition for our clients whatever it is?

5) To test our products we thought of using the Trial version to
simulate a multi-user test environment? Since thats just a 180 day
trial, perhaps the Worgroup Edition or the Light weight Edition might
work. But these editions might not be compatible with our clients'
requirements. The DE doesn't seem to handle multi-user environments,
so we cant effectively test how the application will perform in the
"real world". Any advices here?

Our clients range from small bussiness to nation-wide to multi-
national companies.

Thanks,

- GL
Mar 6 '08 #10

P: n/a
For definitive information on licensing, you need to go either directly to
Microsoft or to the Microsoft-authorized reseller from whom you/your clients
would obtain their license. As far as I know, not even in the
Microsoft-sponsored public newsgroups is there one about licensing
provisions.

I really rather strongly doubt that using the Developer Edition forces your
client to license the Enterprise Edition, however.

Larry Linson
Microsoft Office Access MVP

"Guillermo_Lopez" <g.*****@iesdr.comwrote in message
news:32**********************************@e6g2000p rf.googlegroups.com...
Hello,

Our company has developed several Access applications for our clients
and we wish to expand to use a database server. We wish to use Access
as the front end application and SQL Server 2005 as the back end
Databes Server. Making a Server-Client application database.

I'm very new to SQL Server so my concern is how the licensing works
for a developer like us. I am aware that we can purchase the Developer
edition for $49 USD. Our clients will then have to purchase a their
respective licensing option.

We do not have an issue with this, but i would like a better
understanding of how this works.

1) The developer edition (DE) is the same as the Enterprise edition.
Would our clients have to buy the Enterprise edition ($24,999) if we
develop the SQL server in the DE? Or can they purchase the Standard
or Workgroup edition if the workload allows it?

2) If the client already has the Enterprise Edition on the Server we
wish to use, will they have to buy the license again if we create the
Database? Can they import our Database to thier SQL Server, and our
application connects to thiers?

3) Is there other options that would require a cheaper option for our
clients?

4) With just the DE, can we develope applications and use the
appropriate edition for our clients whatever it is?

5) To test our products we thought of using the Trial version to
simulate a multi-user test environment? Since thats just a 180 day
trial, perhaps the Worgroup Edition or the Light weight Edition might
work. But these editions might not be compatible with our clients'
requirements. The DE doesn't seem to handle multi-user environments,
so we cant effectively test how the application will perform in the
"real world". Any advices here?

Our clients range from small bussiness to nation-wide to multi-
national companies.

Thanks,

- GL

Mar 6 '08 #11

P: n/a
On Mar 5, 4:19 pm, Guillermo_Lopez <g.lo...@iesdr.comwrote:
5) To test our products we thought of using the Trial version to
simulate a multi-user test environment? Since thats just a 180 day
trial, perhaps the Worgroup Edition or the Light weight Edition might
work. But these editions might not be compatible with our clients'
requirements. The DE doesn't seem to handle multi-user environments,
so we cant effectively test how the application will perform in the
"real world". Any advices here?
http://www.discountasp.net/sp_sql2005hosting.aspx

This works well for me.
Mar 6 '08 #12

P: n/a
Thanks alot everybody.

This has been quite educational for me and hopefully for new aspiring
developers in the same track. Thanks again.

- GL
Mar 6 '08 #13

P: n/a
Albert D. Kallal (Pl*******************@msn.com) writes:
Note that the free express visual studio tools are REALLY REALLY nice, and
even has stuff like lunching the query builder in the middle of a stored
proc (just highlight the sql..right click).
The query builder is an awful that breaks several best practices in
SQL Server. I definitely recommend against using it.
--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server 2005 at
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...ads/books.mspx
Books Online for SQL Server 2000 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinf...ons/books.mspx
Mar 6 '08 #14

P: n/a
Guillermo_Lopez <g.*****@iesdr.comwrote:
>1) The developer edition (DE) is the same as the Enterprise edition.
Would our clients have to buy the Enterprise edition ($24,999) if we
develop the SQL server in the DE? Or can they purchase the Standard
or Workgroup edition if the workload allows it?
I am *NOT* a licensing expert.

However I see no reason why the client couldn't event go with free SQL Server Express
edition if the work load allowed it.
>2) If the client already has the Enterprise Edition on the Server we
wish to use, will they have to buy the license again if we create the
Database? Can they import our Database to thier SQL Server, and our
application connects to thiers?
I would think that the license is per machine. So throwing your database on, so long
as it doesn't overload the system should be fine.
>4) With just the DE, can we develope applications and use the
appropriate edition for our clients whatever it is?
I would think so as you the dev are using the SQL Server Express edition.
>5) To test our products we thought of using the Trial version to
simulate a multi-user test environment? Since thats just a 180 day
trial, perhaps the Worgroup Edition or the Light weight Edition might
work. But these editions might not be compatible with our clients'
requirements. The DE doesn't seem to handle multi-user environments,
so we cant effectively test how the application will perform in the
"real world". Any advices here?
My understanding is that the various editions are almost binary identical. The
difference being in whatever makes them specific to their environment such as number
of processors allowed and such.

Thus testing on the SQL Server Express edition installed on a server should be a good
technical test. It may not be a good volume real world test for 250 users of course.

But note that everything I've said is my understanding. I'm not a licensing expert.

Tony
--
Tony Toews, Microsoft Access MVP
Please respond only in the newsgroups so that others can
read the entire thread of messages.
Microsoft Access Links, Hints, Tips & Accounting Systems at
http://www.granite.ab.ca/accsmstr.htm
Tony's Microsoft Access Blog - http://msmvps.com/blogs/access/
Mar 8 '08 #15

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