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Error handling in stored procedure AND checking

I am stumped on the error reporting with sql server. I was told i
need to return @SQLCode(code showing if successful or not) and
@ErrMsg(and the message returned). I am clueless on this.

I wrote this procedure:

Expand|Select|Wrap|Line Numbers
  1. ALTER PROCEDURE [dbo].[usp_AcceptLeaveBalance]
  2.  
  3. @Emp_SSN int,
  4. @Annual_Forward decimal(10,2),
  5. @Sick_Forward decimal(10,2),
  6. @Family_Forward decimal(10,2),
  7. @Other_Forward decimal(10,2)
  8.  
  9. AS
  10.  
  11. UPDATE OT_MAIN
  12.  
  13. SET
  14.  
  15. EmpAnnual_Forward = IsNull(@Annual_Forward, EmpAnnual_Forward),
  16. EmpSick_Forward = IsNull(@Sick_Forward, EmpSick_Forward),
  17. EmpFamily_Forward = IsNull(@Family_Forward, EmpFamily_Forward),
  18. EmpOther_Forward = IsNull(@Other_Forward, EmpOther_Forward)
  19.  
  20. WHERE
  21.  
  22. Emp_SSN=@Emp_SSN
I can execute the procedure using this:

Expand|Select|Wrap|Line Numbers
  1. exec usp_AcceptLeaveBalance 123456789, 10, 10, null, 10
Sql comments that it is successful and that 0 rows are changed. I
know it shouldn't be successful because 123456789 does not refer to
any SSN.

So i am just inquring how to do the error handling and secondly I am
guessing I need to check to see if the ssn exists first.

Any suggestions or help.

I greatly appreciate it, and thanks for the help.
Jan 3 '08 #1
4 4863
SQL Server reports that the stored procedure executed successfully because
there are no errors. Just because your SQL statement attempts to update
non-existing SSN, it does not mean you will get an error. You have to handle
this using application logic, not to expect SQL Server to report an error.

If you really do want to get an error when invalid SSN update is attempted,
then you can add something like the code below at the end of your stored
procedure, just after the UPDATE statement:

IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0
RAISERROR ('Invalid SSN.', 16, 1)

The @@ROWCOUNT function returns the number of rows affected by the last
statement. Then if 0 rows have been updated it means the SSN is invalid and
RAISERROR will force an error.

However, based on the requirements that you need to return @SQLCode and
@ErrMsg, you are probably looking for something like this:

1). Add two OUTPUT parameters to the stored procedure for @@SQLCode and
@ErrMsg:
@SQLCode CHAR(1) OUTPUT, @ErrMsg VARCHAR(20) OUTPUT

2) Inside the stored procedure, just after the UPDATE check if rows have
been updated and set those two parameters:
IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0
SELECT @SQLCode = 'E', @ErrMsg = 'Invalid SSN.'

3) Then when you declare those two parameters and pass to the stored
procedure with the OUTPUT keyword.

This is just one example on how you can return the error code and message,
based on your application architecture different variations can be used. You
can probably go only with error message as the error code is redundant, but
not sure about your specs.

HTH,

Plamen Ratchev
http://www.SQLStudio.com

Jan 3 '08 #2
On Jan 3, 5:25*pm, "Plamen Ratchev" <Pla...@SQLStudio.comwrote:
SQL Server reports that the stored procedure executed successfully because
there are no errors. Just because your SQL statement attempts to update
non-existing SSN, it does not mean you will get an error. You have to handle
this using application logic, not to expect SQL Server to report an error.

If you really do want to get an error when invalid SSN update is attempted,
then you can add something like the code below at the end of your stored
procedure, just after the UPDATE statement:

IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0
RAISERROR ('Invalid SSN.', 16, 1)

The @@ROWCOUNT function returns the number of rows affected by the last
statement. Then if 0 rows have been updated it means the SSN is invalid and
RAISERROR will force an error.

However, based on the requirements that you need to return @SQLCode and
@ErrMsg, you are probably looking for something like this:

1). Add two OUTPUT parameters to the stored procedure for @@SQLCode and
@ErrMsg:
@SQLCode CHAR(1) OUTPUT, @ErrMsg VARCHAR(20) OUTPUT

2) Inside the stored procedure, just after the UPDATE check if rows have
been updated and set those two parameters:
IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0
SELECT @SQLCode = 'E', @ErrMsg = 'Invalid SSN.'

3) Then when you declare those two parameters and pass to the stored
procedure with the OUTPUT keyword.

This is just one example on how you can return the error code and message,
based on your application architecture different variations can be used. You
can probably go only with error message as the error code is redundant, but
not sure about your specs.

HTH,

Plamen Ratchevhttp://www.SQLStudio.com
thanks for the help, i understand what and how you are doing it and
had the output variables in my stored procedure at one time, but the
if statement was my downfall. I showed the guy that told me to create
the procedure and said it was coming along but wanted me to setup if
there was an error(i am guessing any error) that he wants an email
generated with the error sent to him. I am at a complete standstill
till i figure that one out.

Thanks for the help I do appreciate it.
Jan 4 '08 #3
In general if I have an option I would prefer to handle e-mail notifications
at the application layer (that is the .NET application for example), where
this is much easier and more natural. In that case you just pass the output
parameters back to the application layer and use the utilities at hand to
send the e-mail notification.

Based on your notes seems that you need to send the e-mail notification from
inside the stored procedure. Here are a couple options:

1). If on SQL Server 2000 then you can use the built-in extended stored
procedure xp_sendmail. An example will be something like this:

EXEC master.dbo.xp_sendmail
@re***************@company.com',
@message=N'Invalid SSN.'

You can read more about all options and configuration for for xp_sendmail
here:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/l.../ms189505.aspx

2). On SQL Server 2005 you can use sp_send_dbmail. Here is an example:

EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_send_dbmail
@profile_name = 'Test',
@recipients = 't***@company.com',
@body = 'Invalid SSN.',
@subject = 'Automated notification'

More about sp_send_dbmail here:
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190307.aspx

3). On SQL Server 2000 (and I have seen posts it works on SQL Server 2005
too) you can use the third party extended stored procedure xp_smtp_sendmail.
It is using directly SMTP (while xp_sendmail uses MAPI), like sp_send_dbmail
does. More info about it here:
http://sqldev.net/xp/xpsmtp.htm

Note that all those methods for sending e-mail are not automatically
available. Read the information at the above links on security and
configuration.

HTH,

Plamen Ratchev
http://www.SQLStudio.com

Jan 5 '08 #4
On Jan 4, 10:30*pm, "Plamen Ratchev" <Pla...@SQLStudio.comwrote:
In general if I have an option I would prefer to handle e-mail notifications
at the application layer (that is the .NET application for example), where
this is much easier and more natural. In that case you just pass the output
parameters back to the application layer and use the utilities at hand to
send the e-mail notification.

Based on your notes seems that you need to send the e-mail notification from
inside the stored procedure. Here are a couple options:

1). If on SQL Server 2000 then you can use the built-in extended stored
procedure xp_sendmail. An example will be something like this:

EXEC master.dbo.xp_sendmail
* * * *@recipients=N't...@company.com',
* * * *@message=N'Invalid SSN.'

You can read more about all options and configuration for for xp_sendmail
here:http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/l.../ms189505.aspx

2). On SQL Server 2005 you can use sp_send_dbmail. Here is an example:

EXEC msdb.dbo.sp_send_dbmail
* * * *@profile_name = 'Test',
* * * *@recipients = 't...@company.com',
* * * *@body = 'Invalid SSN.',
* * * *@subject = 'Automated notification'

More about sp_send_dbmail here:http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190307.aspx

3). On SQL Server 2000 (and I have seen posts it works on SQL Server 2005
too) you can use the third party extended stored procedure xp_smtp_sendmail.
It is using directly SMTP (while xp_sendmail uses MAPI), like sp_send_dbmail
does. More info about it here:http://sqldev.net/xp/xpsmtp.htm

Note that all those methods for sending e-mail are not automatically
available. Read the information at the above links on security and
configuration.

HTH,

Plamen Ratchevhttp://www.SQLStudio.com
Thanks for the help, I greatly appreciate it. I will look into the
link provided.
Jan 7 '08 #5

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