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Weird speed problem

P: n/a
I have a table on a database that contains 18million records. I need
to design a system that queries this table to produce fast counts.

I have got counts for multiple criteria down to only a few seconds.
Most take under a second however I have a few queries that seam to
take longer which I am working on reducing the time.

I have found some strange behavour in the way SQL Server works.

Take the following two queries which produce exactly the same result:

---------------------------------
select count(*)
from dbo.table
where column1='value1'
and column2='value2'
--------------------------------
and

--------------------------------
select count(*)
from (select id from table where column1 = 'value1') as value1
join (select id from table where column2 = 'value2') as value2
on value1.id = value2.id
---------------------------------

I would assume that the first query should run faster then the second
query. When I look at the query plans, they are almost identical cost
wise. The first takes about 53% of the cost and the second takes 47%.

Yet, the first query takes about 25 seconds to run and the second
takes only 5 seconds.

Does anyone know of a reason why there would be such a difference in
query speed?

Oct 25 '07 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
On Oct 25, 3:13 pm, DBMonitor <spamawa...@yahoo.com.auwrote:
I have a table on a database that contains 18million records. I need
to design a system that queries this table to produce fast counts.

I have got counts for multiple criteria down to only a few seconds.
Most take under a second however I have a few queries that seam to
take longer which I am working on reducing the time.

I have found some strange behavour in the way SQL Server works.

Take the following two queries which produce exactly the same result:

---------------------------------
select count(*)
from dbo.table
where column1='value1'
and column2='value2'
--------------------------------
and

--------------------------------
select count(*)
from (select id from table where column1 = 'value1') as value1
join (select id from table where column2 = 'value2') as value2
on value1.id = value2.id
---------------------------------

I would assume that the first query should run faster then the second
query. When I look at the query plans, they are almost identical cost
wise. The first takes about 53% of the cost and the second takes 47%.

Yet, the first query takes about 25 seconds to run and the second
takes only 5 seconds.

Does anyone know of a reason why there would be such a difference in
query speed?
BTW: Cubes are not an option in this senario.

Oct 25 '07 #2

P: n/a
My guess - and I can only guess from the given information - is that
there is an index on dbo.table(column1), and an index on
dbo.table(column2), but no index on dbo.table(column1,column2). In
the first example the optimizer chooses to use one of the indexes,
then has to scan to resolve the other test. In the second version of
the query the optimizer is using both indexes and then matching up the
results.

If this combination of columns is queried often you might consider
changing one of the two indexes to add the other column as the second
column of the index. So you might end up with the two indexes as
(column1), and (column2,column1). You would not need to indexes with
the same first column.

Roy Harvey
Beacon Falls, CT

On Wed, 24 Oct 2007 22:13:11 -0700, DBMonitor
<sp********@yahoo.com.auwrote:
>I have a table on a database that contains 18million records. I need
to design a system that queries this table to produce fast counts.

I have got counts for multiple criteria down to only a few seconds.
Most take under a second however I have a few queries that seam to
take longer which I am working on reducing the time.

I have found some strange behavour in the way SQL Server works.

Take the following two queries which produce exactly the same result:

---------------------------------
select count(*)
from dbo.table
where column1='value1'
and column2='value2'
--------------------------------
and

--------------------------------
select count(*)
from (select id from table where column1 = 'value1') as value1
join (select id from table where column2 = 'value2') as value2
on value1.id = value2.id
---------------------------------

I would assume that the first query should run faster then the second
query. When I look at the query plans, they are almost identical cost
wise. The first takes about 53% of the cost and the second takes 47%.

Yet, the first query takes about 25 seconds to run and the second
takes only 5 seconds.

Does anyone know of a reason why there would be such a difference in
query speed?
Oct 25 '07 #3

P: n/a
On Wed, 24 Oct 2007 22:13:11 -0700, DBMonitor wrote:
>Does anyone know of a reason why there would be such a difference in
query speed?
Hi DBMonitor,

In addition to the suggestion posted by Roy, have you considered that
this may be caused by cachhing? In other words, if you run the second
query first and the first query last, or if you run both queries
repeatedly, does that change anything to the execution time?

--
Hugo Kornelis, SQL Server MVP
My SQL Server blog: http://sqlblog.com/blogs/hugo_kornelis
Oct 25 '07 #4

P: n/a
DBMonitor (sp********@yahoo.com.au) writes:
Both query plans use indexes on for both the tables though. The plans
are almost identical.
"Almost". Apparently, there is a subtle, but important difference.

Would it be posible for you to post the query plans? If you are on SQL 2005
you can save the graphical execution plan in a file and post that in an
attachment. (Or put it on a web site with a link to it.)
--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server 2005 at
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...ads/books.mspx
Books Online for SQL Server 2000 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinf...ons/books.mspx
Oct 25 '07 #5

P: n/a
On Oct 26, 7:39 am, Erland Sommarskog <esq...@sommarskog.sewrote:
DBMonitor (spamawa...@yahoo.com.au) writes:
Both query plans use indexes on for both the tables though. The plans
are almost identical.

"Almost". Apparently, there is a subtle, but important difference.

Would it be posible for you to post the query plans? If you are on SQL 2005
you can save the graphical execution plan in a file and post that in an
attachment. (Or put it on a web site with a link to it.)

The query plans are as follows:

-----------------
Subquery Query (Total cost 41.52%)
SELECT (0%)<-CS (0%)<-HM IJ (68%)<-IS Col1 (11%)
..................................<-IS Col2 (20%)

Standard Query (Total Cost 58.48%)
SELECT (0%)<-CS (0%)<-HM IJ (78%)<-IS Col1 (8%)
..................................<-IS Col2 (14%)

KEY:
CS - Comput Scalar
HM IJ - Hash Match/Inner Join
IS - Index Seek

-------------------------

The main difference is the hash match process. For the sub querys, the
row size is 15 for the query with the sub queries and 21 for the
standard query however the sub query query has more rows on it.

The only thing I can think of which is happening is some sort of page
io sharing problem. The database server is running on a virtual
machine and the last wait type for the queries are always
'PAGEIOLATCH_SH' and the process runs on one thread.

When I run it on a dedicated server, the times to run the queries are
almost identical and the lastwaittypes change to CXPACKET and uses
multiple threads.

Oct 26 '07 #6

P: n/a
DBMonitor (sp********@yahoo.com.au) writes:
The query plans are as follows:

-----------------
Subquery Query (Total cost 41.52%)
SELECT (0%)<-CS (0%)<-HM IJ (68%)<-IS Col1 (11%)
.................................<-IS Col2 (20%)

Standard Query (Total Cost 58.48%)
SELECT (0%)<-CS (0%)<-HM IJ (78%)<-IS Col1 (8%)
.................................<-IS Col2 (14%)

KEY:
CS - Comput Scalar
HM IJ - Hash Match/Inner Join
IS - Index Seek
I will have to confess that I hoped to see the full plans. Oh well.
Your choice.
When I run it on a dedicated server, the times to run the queries are
almost identical and the lastwaittypes change to CXPACKET and uses
multiple threads.
What happens if you add OPTION (MAXDOP 1) to force a non-parallel plan?

--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server 2005 at
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...ads/books.mspx
Books Online for SQL Server 2000 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinf...ons/books.mspx
Oct 26 '07 #7

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