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delete database file on server -> sharing violation

Hi,

I have some database files (.MDF, .LDF,...) on the server. When I try
to delete them, the warning "Cannot delete file: There has been a
sharing violation. The source or destination file may be in use."
appears.

Since I am new to the environment I don't know where the files come
from and where they might be used.

Can anybody tell me what to do to delete those files?

Thank you.

Oct 17 '07 #1
36 4797
pe******@hotmail.com wrote:
I have some database files (.MDF, .LDF,...) on the server. When I try
to delete them, the warning "Cannot delete file: There has been a
sharing violation. The source or destination file may be in use."
appears.

Since I am new to the environment I don't know where the files come
from and where they might be used.

Can anybody tell me what to do to delete those files?
Assuming this is MS SQL (I don't know what extensions Oracle uses), you
need to detach the database from SQL. Can be done via GUI or CHUI. For
a GUI, use Enterprise Manager (SQL 2000) or Management Studio (2005).
Oct 17 '07 #2
pe******@hotmail.com wrote:
Hi,

I have some database files (.MDF, .LDF,...) on the server. When I try
to delete them, the warning "Cannot delete file: There has been a
sharing violation. The source or destination file may be in use."
appears.

Since I am new to the environment I don't know where the files come
from and where they might be used.

Can anybody tell me what to do to delete those files?

Thank you.
Oracle is not a Microsoft product.

Given that this is Windows reboot the machine. Then delete the files.
--
Daniel A. Morgan
University of Washington
da******@x.washington.edu (replace x with u to respond)
Puget Sound Oracle Users Group
www.psoug.org
Oct 17 '07 #3
see sqlservr.exe

<pe******@hotmail.coma écrit dans le message de news:
11**********************@e34g2000pro.googlegroups. com...
Hi,

I have some database files (.MDF, .LDF,...) on the server. When I try
to delete them, the warning "Cannot delete file: There has been a
sharing violation. The source or destination file may be in use."
appears.

Since I am new to the environment I don't know where the files come
from and where they might be used.

Can anybody tell me what to do to delete those files?

Thank you.

Oct 17 '07 #4
On Oct 17, 3:02 pm, Ed Murphy <emurph...@socal.rr.comwrote:
pearl...@hotmail.com wrote:
I have some database files (.MDF, .LDF,...) on the server. When I try
to delete them, the warning "Cannot delete file: There has been a
sharing violation. The source or destination file may be in use."
appears.
Since I am new to the environment I don't know where the files come
from and where they might be used.
Can anybody tell me what to do to delete those files?

Assuming this is MS SQL (I don't know what extensions Oracle uses), you
need to detach the database from SQL. Can be done via GUI or CHUI. For
a GUI, use Enterprise Manager (SQL 2000) or Management Studio (2005).
Thanks Ed,
but what do I need to do in Enterprise Manager? How can I delete the
file from there?

Oct 17 '07 #5
On Oct 17, 1:36 pm, pearl...@hotmail.com wrote:
Hi,

I have some database files ... on the server. When I try
to delete them. . .

Since I am new to the environment I don't know where the files come
from and where they might be used.
<snip>

Let's see, you have files that you don't know where they come from,
you don't know where they might be used, and yet you are still trying
to delete them . . . .

Oct 17 '07 #6

pearl...@hotmail.com wrote:
Hi,

I have some database files (.MDF, .LDF,...) on the server. When I try
to delete them, the warning "Cannot delete file: There has been a
sharing violation. The source or destination file may be in use."
appears.

Since I am new to the environment I don't know where the files come
from and where they might be used.

Can anybody tell me what to do to delete those files?

Thank you.
If you were running on Linux, the operating system would dutifully
obey your command.
The files would remain accessible to existing processes which already
had handles.
After the last handle on the file(s) has been released, the file(s)
would no longer exist.

Be glad that the OS that you are using has training wheels.

There are utilities from SysInternals (since acquired by Microsoft)
for locating processes holding handles on files. Handle.exe would be
one, process monitor is another.

try here:
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sys...s/default.mspx
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sys...t.svl=featured

You have backups of the databases of interest on this server, right?

hth.

-bdbafh

Oct 17 '07 #7
On Oct 17, 4:22 pm, EdStevens <quetico_...@yahoo.comwrote:
On Oct 17, 1:36 pm, pearl...@hotmail.com wrote:Hi,
I have some database files ... on the server. When I try
to delete them. . .
Since I am new to the environment I don't know where the files come
from and where they might be used.

<snip>

Let's see, you have files that you don't know where they come from,
you don't know where they might be used, and yet you are still trying
to delete them . . . .
Yes, because my chef wants me to delete them and I don't know how.

Oct 17 '07 #8
On Oct 17, 5:05 pm, bdbafh <bdb...@gmail.comwrote:
pearl...@hotmail.com wrote:
Hi,
I have some database files (.MDF, .LDF,...) on the server. When I try
to delete them, the warning "Cannot delete file: There has been a
sharing violation. The source or destination file may be in use."
appears.
Since I am new to the environment I don't know where the files come
from and where they might be used.
Can anybody tell me what to do to delete those files?
Thank you.

If you were running on Linux, the operating system would dutifully
obey your command.
The files would remain accessible to existing processes which already
had handles.
After the last handle on the file(s) has been released, the file(s)
would no longer exist.

Be glad that the OS that you are using has training wheels.

There are utilities from SysInternals (since acquired by Microsoft)
for locating processes holding handles on files. Handle.exe would be
one, process monitor is another.

try here:http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sys...andthreadsutil...

You have backups of the databases of interest on this server, right?

hth.

-bdbafh
I don't know if there are backups.

Thanks, I will try Handle.exe.

Oct 17 '07 #9
pe******@hotmail.com wrote:
On Oct 17, 3:02 pm, Ed Murphy <emurph...@socal.rr.comwrote:
>pearl...@hotmail.com wrote:
>>I have some database files (.MDF, .LDF,...) on the server. When I try
to delete them, the warning "Cannot delete file: There has been a
sharing violation. The source or destination file may be in use."
appears.
Since I am new to the environment I don't know where the files come
from and where they might be used.
Can anybody tell me what to do to delete those files?
Assuming this is MS SQL (I don't know what extensions Oracle uses), you
need to detach the database from SQL. Can be done via GUI or CHUI. For
a GUI, use Enterprise Manager (SQL 2000) or Management Studio (2005).

Thanks Ed,
but what do I need to do in Enterprise Manager? How can I delete the
file from there?
Find the database on the left-hand side, generally like so:

Console Root
+ Microsoft SQL Servers
+ SQL Server Group
+ (name of database server)
+ Databases
+ (name of database)

then right-click on the database -All Tasks -Detach Database

What is your company using SQL for? Is there anyone else there
who is familiar with it?
Oct 17 '07 #10
pe******@hotmail.com wrote:
On Oct 17, 4:22 pm, EdStevens <quetico_...@yahoo.comwrote:
>Let's see, you have files that you don't know where they come from,
you don't know where they might be used, and yet you are still trying
to delete them . . . .

Yes, because my chef wants me to delete them and I don't know how.
At some moment during this operation you might have had an inkling it is
not a good idea to delete files that are apparently in use. You might
consider discussing this with your chef: is it sound approach to just do
away with files even when they are being used?

Regards,

Ruud de Koter.

PS. I am from a very liberal culture, nobody will be surprised if I
question my chef's ideas. I know it doesn't work that way everywhere,
but in cases like this it seems worth the trouble.
Oct 17 '07 #11
(pe******@hotmail.com) writes:
I don't know if there are backups.

Thanks, I will try Handle.exe.
But that is the wrong way. The right way is to drop the databases. But
since you very clearly don't know what you are doing, you should not do,
not matter what your boss tells you. The risk is too big that you delete
the wrong file and cause a disaster.
--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server 2005 at
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...ads/books.mspx
Books Online for SQL Server 2000 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinf...ons/books.mspx
Oct 17 '07 #12
"DA Morgan" <da******@psoug.orgwrote in message
news:11***************@bubbleator.drizzle.com...
>
Given that this is Windows reboot the machine. Then delete the files.
And what exactly is that supposed to do other than waste the poster's time?

--
Daniel A. Morgan
University of Washington
da******@x.washington.edu (replace x with u to respond)
Puget Sound Oracle Users Group
www.psoug.org


--
Greg Moore
SQL Server DBA Consulting Remote and Onsite available!
Email: sql (at) greenms.com http://www.greenms.com/sqlserver.html
Oct 18 '07 #13
On Oct 17, 9:49 pm, DA Morgan <damor...@psoug.orgwrote:
pearl...@hotmail.com wrote:
Hi,
I have some database files (.MDF, .LDF,...) on the server. When I try
to delete them, the warning "Cannot delete file: There has been a
sharing violation. The source or destination file may be in use."
appears.
Since I am new to the environment I don't know where the files come
from and where they might be used.
Can anybody tell me what to do to delete those files?
Thank you.

Oracle is not a Microsoft product.

Given that this is Windows reboot the machine. Then delete the files.
--
Daniel A. Morgan
University of Washington
damor...@x.washington.edu (replace x with u to respond)
Puget Sound Oracle Users Groupwww.psoug.org
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Oct 18 '07 #14
Greg D. Moore (Strider) wrote:
"DA Morgan" <da******@psoug.orgwrote in message
news:11***************@bubbleator.drizzle.com...
>Given that this is Windows reboot the machine. Then delete the files.

And what exactly is that supposed to do other than waste the poster's time?

>--
Daniel A. Morgan
University of Washington
da******@x.washington.edu (replace x with u to respond)
Puget Sound Oracle Users Group
www.psoug.org
Fix the problem. Half the time, with Windows, the correct solution to a
problem is a reboot. This is one of those times.
--
Daniel A. Morgan
University of Washington
da******@x.washington.edu (replace x with u to respond)
Puget Sound Oracle Users Group
www.psoug.org
Oct 18 '07 #15
Erland Sommarskog wrote:
(pe******@hotmail.com) writes:
>I don't know if there are backups.

Thanks, I will try Handle.exe.

But that is the wrong way. The right way is to drop the databases.

Would you mind NOT posting that in an Oracle newsgroup?!?
--
Regards,
Frank van Bortel

Top-posting is one way to shut me up...
Oct 18 '07 #16
"DA Morgan" <da******@psoug.orgwrote in message
news:11***************@bubbleator.drizzle.com...
Greg D. Moore (Strider) wrote:
>"DA Morgan" <da******@psoug.orgwrote in message
news:11***************@bubbleator.drizzle.com.. .
>>Given that this is Windows reboot the machine. Then delete the files.

And what exactly is that supposed to do other than waste the poster's
time?

>>--
Daniel A. Morgan
University of Washington
da******@x.washington.edu (replace x with u to respond)
Puget Sound Oracle Users Group
www.psoug.org

Fix the problem. Half the time, with Windows, the correct solution to a
problem is a reboot.
Only to those who are clueless.
This is one of those times.
No, this is clearly one of those times when that would almost certainly NOT
work.

--
Daniel A. Morgan
University of Washington
da******@x.washington.edu (replace x with u to respond)
Puget Sound Oracle Users Group
www.psoug.org


--
Greg Moore
SQL Server DBA Consulting Remote and Onsite available!
Email: sql (at) greenms.com http://www.greenms.com/sqlserver.html
Oct 18 '07 #17
Given that this is Windows reboot the machine. Then delete the files.

Totally clueless.

If you don't know then just keep quiet instead of posting totally misleading
advice that may (probably) cause business outage to the OP.

--
Tony Rogerson, SQL Server MVP
http://sqlblogcasts.com/blogs/tonyrogerson
[Ramblings from the field from a SQL consultant]
http://sqlserverfaq.com
[UK SQL User Community]

Oct 18 '07 #18
I have some database files (.MDF, .LDF,...) on the server. When I try
to delete them, the warning "Cannot delete file: There has been a
sharing violation. The source or destination file may be in use."
appears.
these are files associated with a SQL Server database - you need to isolate
the database and if you don't need it anymore then DROP DATABASE it through
SQL Server management tools

--
Tony Rogerson, SQL Server MVP
http://sqlblogcasts.com/blogs/tonyrogerson
[Ramblings from the field from a SQL consultant]
http://sqlserverfaq.com
[UK SQL User Community]
Oct 18 '07 #19
If you saw a pan of potatoes cooking on the stove would you lift it up and
put it in the bin?

No, they are in use and as such there is a purpose.

Find out what database these are for, undoubtedly it will be some important
database.

--
Tony Rogerson, SQL Server MVP
http://sqlblogcasts.com/blogs/tonyrogerson
[Ramblings from the field from a SQL consultant]
http://sqlserverfaq.com
[UK SQL User Community]

Oct 18 '07 #20
On Oct 18, 4:42 am, "Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)"
<mooregr_deletet...@greenms.comwrote:
"DA Morgan" <damor...@psoug.orgwrote in message

news:11***************@bubbleator.drizzle.com...
Given that this is Windows reboot the machine. Then delete the files.

And what exactly is that supposed to do other than waste the poster's time?
Well, I would hope most chefs consider flies something to be deleted,
unless maybe they're trying to get in the new Michelin Guide for
Frogs.

So, why was it this was posted to cdos?

jg
--
@home.com is bogus.
"KRMTLGS" - vanity plate, couldn't see if driver was green.
http://www.amazon.com/Michelin-Guide.../dp/2067129902

Oct 18 '07 #21
DA Morgan (da******@psoug.org) writes:
Fix the problem. Half the time, with Windows, the correct solution to a
problem is a reboot. This is one of those times.
Maybe. If SQL Server is not set to auto-start it will work, in so far that
you will get rid of the files. But since the databases will still be in
master.sys.databases, it's not a very pretty solution. And in most cases,
SQL Server is set to auto-start, in which case rebooting the box is not
going to help at all.

But your answer is interesting. I take it that to get rid of database
files with Oracle, DROP DATABASE is not the way to go, or at least it is
not sufficient. But do you really have to reboot to get Oracle to let go
of the files?
--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server 2005 at
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...ads/books.mspx
Books Online for SQL Server 2000 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinf...ons/books.mspx
Oct 18 '07 #22
On Thu, 18 Oct 2007 19:35:59 +0100, "Tony Rogerson"
<to**********@torver.netwrote:
>
Totally clueless.

If you don't know then just keep quiet instead of posting totally misleading
advice that may (probably) cause business outage to the OP.
It was crossposted to an Oracle Usenet group, was it.
By the way, if you are such an eminent sqlserver guru why don't you
just post the correct answer instead of this useless flame?
Could it be you don't know the correct answer?

Why sqlserver 'gurus' promote sqlserver by flaming Oracle users?
Is this the most recent Microsoft sqlserver promotion campaign, or is
this just the personal lack of ethics of an arrogant self-apporinted
sqlserver 'guru'?
Because on the other hand Oracle users aren't visiting sqlserver
Usenet groups to bash sqlserver!

--
Sybrand Bakker
Senior Oracle DBA
Oct 18 '07 #23
On Thu, 18 Oct 2007 13:25:45 -0400, "Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)"
<mo****************@greenms.comwrote:
>No, this is clearly one of those times when that would almost certainly NOT
work.
If it doesn't work, acknowledging the OP crossposted this to a
sqlserver AND an Oracle forum. why flame an Oracle DBA instead of
posting the correct response?
Because you don't know the correct response?

--
Sybrand Bakker
Senior Oracle DBA
Oct 18 '07 #24
On Thu, 18 Oct 2007 21:15:21 +0000 (UTC), Erland Sommarskog
<es****@sommarskog.sewrote:
>But your answer is interesting. I take it that to get rid of database
files with Oracle, DROP DATABASE is not the way to go, or at least it is
not sufficient. But do you really have to reboot to get Oracle to let go
of the files?
Unix (you know the OS people blinded by Microsoft know nothing about)
will keep the inode of the file open, even if you deleted the file.

--
Sybrand Bakker
Senior Oracle DBA
Oct 18 '07 #25
Tony Rogerson wrote:
>Given that this is Windows reboot the machine. Then delete the files.

Totally clueless.
I don't see you offering a solution to the original poster.

Go ahead ... here's your chance ... if you don't like my answer then
by all means tell everyone, including the person asking for help how
to solve the problem.

I've never seen a Windows problem yet solved by cross-posting to an
irrelevant usenet group followed up with an insult.

If you have a solution ... why are you incapable of posting it?
--
Daniel A. Morgan
University of Washington
da******@x.washington.edu (replace x with u to respond)
Puget Sound Oracle Users Group
www.psoug.org
Oct 19 '07 #26
DA Morgan wrote:
Tony Rogerson wrote:
>>Given that this is Windows reboot the machine. Then delete the files.

Totally clueless.

I don't see you offering a solution to the original poster.

Go ahead ... here's your chance ... if you don't like my answer then
by all means tell everyone, including the person asking for help how
to solve the problem.

I've never seen a Windows problem yet solved by cross-posting to an
irrelevant usenet group followed up with an insult.

If you have a solution ... why are you incapable of posting it?
He probably chose not to post it, because a couple of adequate
solutions have already been posted. However, they've been a bit
scattered and lacking context, so here's a comprehensive answer:

The files are presumably in use by MS SQL. They may or may not be
needed by the users. If not, then you can get rid of them in any
of the following ways:

1) SQL CHUI (Query Analyzer or Enterprise Manager for SQL 2000,
Management Studio for SQL 2005) - execute a DROP DATABASE
command, e.g.

DROP DATABASE foobar

This requires knowing the name of the database, which is usually
identical or at least similar to the filenames, e.g. database
foobar may have filenames foobar.mdf and foobar.ldf

2) SQL GUI (Enterprise Manager or Management Studio) - find the
database in the Explorer-style tree on the left, right-click
and select "Delete Database". This deletes the physical files.

Detaching the database (via CHUI or GUI) does not delete the physical
files, but makes SQL forget about the database until/unless you
re-attach them. You can then delete the physical files in the usual
fashion, which accomplishes the same as the above, but in a more
roundabout fashion.

You can also delete the physical files in the usual fashion while the
SQL service is stopped (or before it starts). Rebooting is insufficient
if the service auto-starts. In addition, SQL will complain about the
files being missing; this probably won't interfere with its other
databases, but why do it the messy way when the clean way is easier?
Oct 19 '07 #27
By the way, if you are such an eminent sqlserver guru why don't you
just post the correct answer instead of this useless flame?
Could it be you don't know the correct answer?
I replied in the ms-sqlserver group and gave the correct reply to the OP
instead of this useless unprofessional diatribe.

--
Tony Rogerson, SQL Server MVP
http://sqlblogcasts.com/blogs/tonyrogerson
[Ramblings from the field from a SQL consultant]
http://sqlserverfaq.com
[UK SQL User Community]
Oct 19 '07 #28
I don't see you offering a solution to the original poster.

I posted the answer in the ms-sqlserver group where it belonged - go check.
FYI LDF/MDF's are related to the databases on a SQL Server instance and as
such he obviously has SQL Server running and a database using those files
that is online.

To solve the problem drop the database - there, wasn;t difficult being
polite was it.

A bit far from a reboot / warm start the OS which woudl do absolutely
nothing except ccost the OP's business outage while the box reboots and
things come back online, and he would still have the problem.

--
Tony Rogerson, SQL Server MVP
http://sqlblogcasts.com/blogs/tonyrogerson
[Ramblings from the field from a SQL consultant]
http://sqlserverfaq.com
[UK SQL User Community]

Oct 19 '07 #29
On 18 Okt., 18:23, sybra...@hccnet.nl wrote:
On Thu, 18 Oct 2007 19:35:59 +0100, "Tony Rogerson"

<tonyroger...@torver.netwrote:
Totally clueless.
If you don't know then just keep quiet instead of posting totally misleading
advice that may (probably) cause business outage to the OP.

It was crossposted to an Oracle Usenet group, was it.
By the way, if you are such an eminent sqlserver guru why don't you
just post the correct answer instead of this useless flame?
Could it be you don't know the correct answer?

Why sqlserver 'gurus' promote sqlserver by flaming Oracle users?
Is this the most recent Microsoft sqlserver promotion campaign, or is
this just the personal lack of ethics of an arrogant self-apporinted
sqlserver 'guru'?
Because on the other hand Oracle users aren't visiting sqlserver
Usenet groups to bash sqlserver!

--
Sybrand Bakker
Senior Oracle DBA

Thank you all for the various suggestions.
I decided not to delete the files.

And I am sorry for having posted my question in the oracle forum but I
just hoped someone at all could help me.

Regards
Pearl

Oct 19 '07 #30
(sy******@hccnet.nl) writes:
Because on the other hand Oracle users aren't visiting sqlserver
Usenet groups to bash sqlserver!
Oh, D.A. Morgan is a regular, eh, contributor to
comp.databases.ms-sqlserver.

--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server 2005 at
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...ads/books.mspx
Books Online for SQL Server 2000 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinf...ons/books.mspx
Oct 19 '07 #31
Erland Sommarskog wrote:
(sy******@hccnet.nl) writes:
>Because on the other hand Oracle users aren't visiting sqlserver
Usenet groups to bash sqlserver!

Oh, D.A. Morgan is a regular, eh, contributor to
comp.databases.ms-sqlserver.
Actually I post there only a few times a year.

Except when people manage to confuse Oracle with a Microsoft product
and cross-post to every usenet group they can spell.

When they do they should be grateful I suggest a three-fingered
salute. As I get older I sometimes forget to use all three. <g>
--
Daniel A. Morgan
University of Washington
da******@x.washington.edu (replace x with u to respond)
Puget Sound Oracle Users Group
www.psoug.org
Oct 19 '07 #32
"DA Morgan" <da******@psoug.orgwrote in message
news:11***************@bubbleator.drizzle.com...
Tony Rogerson wrote:
>>Given that this is Windows reboot the machine. Then delete the files.

Totally clueless.

I don't see you offering a solution to the original poster.
I didn't offer a solution since several others offered valid, correct
solutions.

I was pointing out the inaccuracy of your answer.

Go ahead ... here's your chance ... if you don't like my answer then
by all means tell everyone, including the person asking for help how
to solve the problem.

I've never seen a Windows problem yet solved by cross-posting to an
irrelevant usenet group followed up with an insult.

If you have a solution ... why are you incapable of posting it?
I'm certainly capable. However, my point was to correct your mistaken
advice which would have only wasted the poster's time.
And in any case, I'm doing what should have been done long ago in this
thread and setting followups only to the comp.databases.ms-sqlserver group.
(as either of us should have done previously in this thread.)

--
Daniel A. Morgan
University of Washington
da******@x.washington.edu (replace x with u to respond)
Puget Sound Oracle Users Group
www.psoug.org


--
Greg Moore
SQL Server DBA Consulting Remote and Onsite available!
Email: sql (at) greenms.com http://www.greenms.com/sqlserver.html
Oct 20 '07 #33
<sy******@hccnet.nlwrote in message
news:97********************************@4ax.com...
On Thu, 18 Oct 2007 13:25:45 -0400, "Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)"
<mo****************@greenms.comwrote:
>>No, this is clearly one of those times when that would almost certainly
NOT
work.

If it doesn't work, acknowledging the OP crossposted this to a
sqlserver AND an Oracle forum. why flame an Oracle DBA instead of
posting the correct response?
If correcting a wrong answer is considered flaming in the CDOS world then
the more's the pity.

Add in the fact that DA Morgan has a history of posting inaccurate answers
in the CDMS group, I felt it was important to correct his response before
his advice potentially cost the original poster's company downtime and
possibly money.
Because you don't know the correct response?
Actually I know several possible routes, the DROP DATABASE is generally the
best route. Unfortunately given original posters obvious lack of knowledge
in this case, I suspect he'll need a bit more handholding to figure out
where and how to do that.

Now a question for you, as you state with Unix (which snide comments about
being blinded about), the inode will be held open until all access is
complete (which btw, I think is NOT true in at least one distro of Linux as
has been explained to me, which is just plain bad if true).

However, I would suspect simply deleting the files would cause error
messages to show up when Oracle was restarted or the system was restarted?
Most likely this would be non-fatal but as I prefer to run w/o errors, I'm
curious as to the "correct" way to remove a database on a Unix system.

>
--
Sybrand Bakker
Senior Oracle DBA


--
Greg Moore
SQL Server DBA Consulting Remote and Onsite available!
Email: sql (at) greenms.com http://www.greenms.com/sqlserver.html
Oct 20 '07 #34
On Sat, 20 Oct 2007 00:41:04 -0400, "Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)"
<mo****************@greenms.comwrote:
>However, I would suspect simply deleting the files would cause error
messages to show up when Oracle was restarted or the system was restarted?
Most likely this would be non-fatal but as I prefer to run w/o errors, I'm
curious as to the "correct" way to remove a database on a Unix system.
Dbca: delete database.

--
Sybrand Bakker
Senior Oracle DBA
Oct 20 '07 #35
<sy******@hccnet.nlwrote in message
news:n7********************************@4ax.com...
On Sat, 20 Oct 2007 00:41:04 -0400, "Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)"
<mo****************@greenms.comwrote:
>>However, I would suspect simply deleting the files would cause error
messages to show up when Oracle was restarted or the system was restarted?
Most likely this would be non-fatal but as I prefer to run w/o errors, I'm
curious as to the "correct" way to remove a database on a Unix system.

Dbca: delete database.
Thanks. I'll keep that in mind.

>
--
Sybrand Bakker
Senior Oracle DBA


--
Greg Moore
SQL Server DBA Consulting Remote and Onsite available!
Email: sql (at) greenms.com http://www.greenms.com/sqlserver.html
Oct 20 '07 #36
On Oct 20, 9:06 am, "Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)"
<mooregr_deletet...@greenms.comwrote:
<sybra...@hccnet.nlwrote in message

news:n7********************************@4ax.com...
On Sat, 20 Oct 2007 00:41:04 -0400, "Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)"
<mooregr_deletet...@greenms.comwrote:
>However, I would suspect simply deleting the files would cause error
messages to show up when Oracle was restarted or the system was restarted?
Most likely this would be non-fatal but as I prefer to run w/o errors, I'm
curious as to the "correct" way to remove a database on a Unix system.
Dbca: delete database.

Thanks. I'll keep that in mind.
Is a database that you are talking about the same as the database that
Sybrand is talking about? It is pretty common for the Oracle
equivalent to an MS database to be a schema. So the correct way on a
unix system would be a "drop user" command, with other commands such
as "drop tablespace including contents and data files" for actually
removing files. But you really should know what you are doing.
Whether the datafile handles are kept open varies by configuration and
versions.

jg
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Oct 22 '07 #37

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