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complete NOOB hope someone can point me in the right direction

I have been programming access databases for 8 years.
Well today I find out that I need to know SQL.
HUH LOL

well I don't have a clue as to how people even enter data into
a sql database or how to manipulate or retrieve data.

Can someone please recommend a book to get me started?

thank you very much for any and all help with this.
Apr 20 '07 #1
2 1241
sparks (js******@swbell.net) writes:
I have been programming access databases for 8 years.
Well today I find out that I need to know SQL.
HUH LOL

well I don't have a clue as to how people even enter data into
a sql database or how to manipulate or retrieve data.

Can someone please recommend a book to get me started?

thank you very much for any and all help with this.
Isn't Access an SQL database? Or since you post in this newsgroup,
you specifically mean SQL Server databases?

SQL Server is a server application that accepts data from clients. Clients
can be implemented in a multitude of ways, both as Windows applications
and web applications. You can write applictions in .Net, in Perl, in VB6,
in Java, in about every language. You can even use Access - this appears
in fact to be a common solution.

--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server 2005 at
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...ads/books.mspx
Books Online for SQL Server 2000 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinf...ons/books.mspx
Apr 20 '07 #2
Erland Sommarskog wrote:
Isn't Access an SQL database?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Access#Features

One of the benefits of Access from a programmer's perspective is its
relative compatibility with SQL (structured query language) —queries may
be viewed and edited as SQL statements, and SQL statements can be used
directly in Macros and VBA Modules to manipulate Access tables. In this
case, "relatively compatible" means that SQL for Access contains many
quirks, and as a result, it has been dubbed "Bill's SQL" by industry
insiders. Users may mix and use both VBA and "Macros" for programming
forms and logic and offers object-oriented possibilities.
Apr 22 '07 #3

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