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Replace Access with a .NET front end and SQL Backend solution.

P: n/a
My company currently has about 20-25 Ms Access Database that they want to
replace the FE with .net and the BE on SQL.
This will be done using Visual Studio 2005. Once the FE is converted to .net
and the BE is SQL they all will be accessed through our intranet (sharepoint).
I work in Ms Access and intermediate at VBA and just learing SQL through the
ENTERPRISE MANAGER SCREEN.
I am just now looking at what Visual Studio 2005 is, but can some one tell me
how this will all connect?

What is the typical route for this process?
Ms access to SQL - upsizing wizard or SQL importing?????

Ms Access FE to .net - summarize how this is done in visual studio (user face
rebuilt) then placed on sharepoint?
Can anyone sum this up?

--
Message posted via http://www.sqlmonster.com
Jul 21 '06 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
Anns via SQLMonster.com (u22580@uwe) writes:
I work in Ms Access and intermediate at VBA and just learing SQL through
the ENTERPRISE MANAGER SCREEN.
Enterprise Manager is a tool that exists only in SQL 2000, and I assume
- and hope! - that you will implement your new solution on SQL 2005. The
tool in SQL 2005 is SQL Server Management Studio which replaces both
Enterprise Manager and Query Analyzer. As long as you work with SQL 2000,
QA should be your main tool, because it is from this tool you most easily
can run queries. EM may look a little like Access, so you may feel com-
fortable with that. However, SQL Server is very different from Access,
so best is to use a tool that forces you to unlearn a lot things.
I am just now looking at what Visual Studio 2005 is, but can some one
tell me how this will all connect?

What is the typical route for this process?
Ms access to SQL - upsizing wizard or SQL importing?????
Yes, there is an upsizing wizard. And the word that I have from people
who have worked extensively with both Access and SQL Server is that you
should stay away from it. Access and SQL Server are very different and
build on different mindset. You should more or less redesign your
application for SQL Server and .Net. This may seem like a lot more work
that you had expected, but it is likely to pay off in the long run with
lower maintenance costs, if you do it right from the start.

--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server 2005 at
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...ads/books.mspx
Books Online for SQL Server 2000 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinf...ons/books.mspx
Jul 21 '06 #2

P: n/a
SQL 2005 - SQL Server Managment Studio, thank you, when I said I was
currently learning I am learning unfortunately on 2000 b/c that is the study
material I bought and cannot afford to upgrade right now.

You are right with the SQL 2000 Enterprise edition, it is so user friendly
and that edition is all I know and still learning at best with that.

Yes, my company will be doing this on 2005 but for now, my learning is on
2000.
You see I work in a another department besides IT and between that job/baby
and small buisness, I am trying to get my DBA (2000) certification, I would
like the upgrade (2005) but do not have the funds to upgrade.
I have an opportunity to help with this conversion process and learn in
between, but I am trying to get a better grasp of this before sinking.

Does the 2005 Managment Studio look alot like Enterprise manager?
Answer:

Ms Access to SQL - I am assuming your answer would then be exporting/dts tool
from SQL to pull over all these db's?
Answer:
Erland, tell me once the db's are pull over to SQL, now I have Visual Studio
2005 software open - what steps are taken in this software to rebuilt the
user faces and then how is it then put on SHAREPOINT??????????
ANSWER:
Erland Sommarskog wrote:
>I work in Ms Access and intermediate at VBA and just learing SQL through
the ENTERPRISE MANAGER SCREEN.

Enterprise Manager is a tool that exists only in SQL 2000, and I assume
- and hope! - that you will implement your new solution on SQL 2005. The
tool in SQL 2005 is SQL Server Management Studio which replaces both
Enterprise Manager and Query Analyzer. As long as you work with SQL 2000,
QA should be your main tool, because it is from this tool you most easily
can run queries. EM may look a little like Access, so you may feel com-
fortable with that. However, SQL Server is very different from Access,
so best is to use a tool that forces you to unlearn a lot things.
>I am just now looking at what Visual Studio 2005 is, but can some one
tell me how this will all connect?

What is the typical route for this process?

Ms access to SQL - upsizing wizard or SQL importing?????

Yes, there is an upsizing wizard. And the word that I have from people
who have worked extensively with both Access and SQL Server is that you
should stay away from it. Access and SQL Server are very different and
build on different mindset. You should more or less redesign your
application for SQL Server and .Net. This may seem like a lot more work
that you had expected, but it is likely to pay off in the long run with
lower maintenance costs, if you do it right from the start.
--
Message posted via SQLMonster.com
http://www.sqlmonster.com/Uwe/Forums...neral/200607/1
Jul 21 '06 #3

P: n/a
Anns via SQLMonster.com (u22580@uwe) writes:
SQL 2005 - SQL Server Managment Studio, thank you, when I said I was
currently learning I am learning unfortunately on 2000 b/c that is the
study material I bought and cannot afford to upgrade right now.
You can download the Evaluation Edition of SQL 2005 from
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...A7F-C094-49A2-
A050-2D07993566EC&displaylang=en.

Even if your study material only covers SQL 2000, I still think you
should work with SQL 2005.
You are right with the SQL 2000 Enterprise edition, it is so user friendly
and that edition is all I know and still learning at best with that.
Enterprise Manager != Enterprise Edition. Enterprise Manager is available
in all editions of SQL 2000, except for the desktop version MSDE. The
difference between the editions lies in what features that are available,
and what purpose the edition is licensed for.
Does the 2005 Managment Studio look alot like Enterprise manager?
It's not completely different, but there are also considerable differences.
In the end, you will only do yourself a disservice by learning a tool
that you will not work with.

But Enterprise Manager and SQL Server Management Studio are just the
tools. These are not what you should focus your learning on. You should
learn how to create databases, tables and indexes, and how to write
queries. You may think that you know SQL from Access, but as I said,
there are considerable differences. In general, SQL Server offers much
more powerful constructs, but there also features from Access that
are completely missing. A classic example is dynamic crosstabs.
Ms Access to SQL - I am assuming your answer would then be exporting/dts
tool from SQL to pull over all these db's?
Maybe. As I said, I think you should consider a major redesign, at
least in places where you have some quirks in Access, or in places
where SQL Server offers better solutions. Then again, even if you go
for a new schema, it may of course be a good idea bring over the
Access databases to SQL Server, so that you can work with them locally.
And for that end SQL Server Integration Services (which is the successor
to DTS in SQL 2005) may be a good choice. (I've never worked with
neither DTS nor SSIS, so I don't really know.)

Erland, tell me once the db's are pull over to SQL, now I have Visual
Studio 2005 software open - what steps are taken in this software to
rebuilt the user faces and then how is it then put on
SHAREPOINT??????????
Since you are migrating from Access to .Net, I would assume that you
more or less rewrite the front-end code entirely, but you should ask in a
..Net forum about that.

Sharepoint? I know there is a product with that name, but I have very
little idea what it's good for. So I cannot answer that question.
--
Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, es****@sommarskog.se

Books Online for SQL Server 2005 at
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/pro...ads/books.mspx
Books Online for SQL Server 2000 at
http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinf...ons/books.mspx
Jul 21 '06 #4

P: n/a
A great walk thru / how to on the MS Access to SQL Server 2005 was
blogged. I tried it and made my life much easier.

http://cfpayne.wordpress.com/2006/07...l-server-2005/

Precia
Anns via SQLMonster.com wrote:
My company currently has about 20-25 Ms Access Database that they want to
replace the FE with .net and the BE on SQL.
This will be done using Visual Studio 2005. Once the FE is converted to .net
and the BE is SQL they all will be accessed through our intranet (sharepoint).
I work in Ms Access and intermediate at VBA and just learing SQL through the
ENTERPRISE MANAGER SCREEN.
I am just now looking at what Visual Studio 2005 is, but can some one tell me
how this will all connect?

What is the typical route for this process?
Ms access to SQL - upsizing wizard or SQL importing?????

Ms Access FE to .net - summarize how this is done in visual studio (user face
rebuilt) then placed on sharepoint?
Can anyone sum this up?

--
Message posted via http://www.sqlmonster.com
Jul 24 '06 #5

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