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Slightly off-topic topic

P: n/a
Hi,
I wanted to know how actually a database converter works.
I am working on a converter from DBF to MS SQL server 2000
using Visual Basic 6.0. I wanted to know that once a legacy database
is enterd in the program, how does it get normalised.
I have aboout 40 tables in DBASE IV format. I want to convert them
into relational database and store them on server. But on conversion,
how can the converted data be normalised by itself.

Awaiting the replies,
Thanks

Feb 14 '06 #1
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P: n/a
Shwetabh wrote:
Hi,
I wanted to know how actually a database converter works.
I am working on a converter from DBF to MS SQL server 2000
using Visual Basic 6.0. I wanted to know that once a legacy database
is enterd in the program, how does it get normalised.
I have aboout 40 tables in DBASE IV format. I want to convert them
into relational database and store them on server. But on conversion,
how can the converted data be normalised by itself.

Awaiting the replies,
Thanks


SQL Server Data Transformation Services has an Import Wizard that will
load DBFs to SQL tables for you.

Microsoft Visual FoxPro has an Upsizing Wizard that will also migrate
DBFsto SQL Server (DBase IV files should be compatible).

As for normalization. No tool can do that entirely from data alone
because normalization requires knowledge of functional dependencies. In
a non-normalized data set the FDs may not be obvious and probably
aren't defined by metadata. Also, if the data set isn't normalized
there may be data anomalies that can only be sensibly resolved using
knowledge of your business.

There are data integration, profiling and ER-modelling tools that will
help with the process but ultimately a well-designed data model is a
product of business analysis followed by conceptual modelling followed
by logical modelling followed by physical modelling. Tools aid that
process, they don't eliminate it.

--
David Portas, SQL Server MVP

Whenever possible please post enough code to reproduce your problem.
Including CREATE TABLE and INSERT statements usually helps.
State what version of SQL Server you are using and specify the content
of any error messages.

SQL Server Books Online:
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/m...S,SQL.90).aspx
--

Feb 14 '06 #2

P: n/a
I answered your same question 2 weeks ago:

http://groups.google.co.uk/group/com...26e23c7457193e

--
David Portas, SQL Server MVP

Whenever possible please post enough code to reproduce your problem.
Including CREATE TABLE and INSERT statements usually helps.
State what version of SQL Server you are using and specify the content
of any error messages.

SQL Server Books Online:
http://msdn2.microsoft.com/library/m...S,SQL.90).aspx
--

Feb 14 '06 #3

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