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Installing packages

P: n/a
I'm new to Python, and just downloaded Py2.6. I also want to use Nose. So I downloaded the latest sources, but it's not at all clear what's the best way to put this stuff into the Python package system. Nose supports easy_install, easy_install doesn't have an installer for Windows and Py2.6, so I think I can't use that. (It only does 2.5 and earlier. (Should I go to Py2.5? Is there more support out there for that?)).
Alan Baljeu
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Nov 13 '08 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
Alan Baljeu schrieb:
I'm new to Python, and just downloaded Py2.6. I also want to use Nose. So I downloaded the latest sources, but it's not at all clear what's the best way to put this stuff into the Python package system. Nose supports easy_install, easy_install doesn't have an installer for Windows and Py2.6, so I think I can't use that. (It only does 2.5 and earlier. (Should I go to Py2.5? Is there more support out there for that?)).
2.6 is most probably a bit to fresh.

I'd go for 2.5.
Diez
Nov 13 '08 #2

P: n/a
Thanks, I have 2.5 now and it works great with Nose. Now for my next project, I want to embed Python and Nose in a C++ program. I know this means using the python25.dll, and I know how to setup the calls.
I think though I will not be installing Python on target systems, so I don't want to rely on sys.path including "site-install". I would have a directory with appropriate python files, a subdir for nose, and keep those relative to the application dir.

For the Python interpreter, two questions:
1. What is the best way to manage the import paths?
2. How can I invoke an interactive console for this embedded python? I'd like to play with things while my app is running.

----- Original Message ----
From: Diez B. Roggisch <de***@nospam.web.de>
To: py*********@python.org
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 2:41:03 PM
Subject: Re: Installing packages

Alan Baljeu schrieb:
I'm new to Python, and just downloaded Py2.6. I also want to use Nose. So I downloaded the latest sources, but it's not at all clear what's the best way to put this stuff into the Python package system. Nose supports easy_install, easy_install doesn't have an installer for Windows and Py2.6, so I think I can't use that. (It only does 2.5 and earlier. (Should I go to Py2.5? Is there more support out there for that?)).
2.6 is most probably a bit to fresh.

I'd go for 2.5.
__________________________________________________ ________________
Ask a question on any topic and get answers from real people. Go to Yahoo! Answers and share what you know at http://ca.answers.yahoo.com
Nov 13 '08 #3

P: n/a
On Nov 13, 2:25*pm, Alan Baljeu <alanbal...@yahoo.comwrote:
I'm new to Python, and just downloaded Py2.6. *I also want to use Nose.*So I downloaded the latest sources, but it's not at all clear what's the best way to put this stuff into the Python package system. *Nose supports easy_install, easy_install doesn't have an installer for Windows and Py2..6, so I think I can't use that. *(It only does 2.5 and earlier. *(Should I go to Py2.5? *Is there more support out there for that?)). *

Alan Baljeu
You are the second poster today concerned about the lack of setuptools
for Py2.6
All you have to do is download the setuptools source and run:
C:\Python26\python setup.py install

You'll need a compatible compiler (Visual Studio Express 2008 works
fine) but if you're running Python on Windows you should have that
anyway or you'll forever be at the mercy of the packagers.
Nov 13 '08 #4

P: n/a
En Thu, 13 Nov 2008 19:41:44 -0200, Alan Baljeu <al********@yahoo.com>
escribió:
Thanks, I have 2.5 now and it works great with Nose. Now for my next
project, I want to embed Python and Nose in a C++ program. I know this
means using the python25.dll, and I know how to setup the calls.
I think though I will not be installing Python on target systems, so I
don't want to rely on sys.path including "site-install". I would have a
directory with appropriate python files, a subdir for nose, and keep
those relative to the application dir.

For the Python interpreter, two questions:
1. What is the best way to manage the import paths?
If you mimic a tipical Python installation layout in your application
(don't have to include everything, only what you need) and you call
Py_SetProgramName at the very beginning of your program, then the default
rules for building sys.path will work.
(Mmm, I can't find out where exactly those rules are explained).
2. How can I invoke an interactive console for this embedded python?
I'd like to play with things while my app is running.
Looks like PyRun_InteractiveOne and PyRun_InteractiveLoop should work for
you, but I've never used them.

--
Gabriel Genellina

Nov 15 '08 #5

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