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Re: What is the best Python GUI API?

P: n/a
Abah Joseph wrote:
What is the best Python GUI API? I am planning to start my first GUI
application and I need something easy and cross platform. Qt
applications look beautiful but I hate the license. What do you advice?
I agree about the Qt-license,
and I'm now a happy wxPython user.

cheers,
Stef
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Nov 13 '08 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
On 13 Nov, 18:59, Stef Mientki <stef.mien...@gmail.comwrote:
Abah Joseph wrote:
What is the best Python GUI API? I am planning to start my first GUI
application and I need something easy and cross platform. Qt
applications look beautiful but I hate the license. What do you advice?

I agree about the Qt-license,
and I'm now a happy wxPython user.
I too have had good results with wxwidgets when developing a GUI. The
cross-platform native look and feel was a major benefit from my point
of view allowing screens to "look native" under different OSs with no
code changes.

--
James
Nov 13 '08 #2

P: n/a
rm
On Nov 13, 2:23*pm, James Harris <james.harri...@googlemail.com>
wrote:
On 13 Nov, 18:59, Stef Mientki <stef.mien...@gmail.comwrote:
Abah Joseph wrote:
*What is the best Python GUI API? I am planning to start my first GUI
application and I need something easy and cross platform. Qt
applications look beautiful but I hate the license. What do you advice?
I agree about the Qt-license,
and I'm now a happy wxPython user.

I too have had good results with wxwidgets when developing a GUI. The
cross-platform native look and feel was a major benefit from my point
of view allowing screens to "look native" under different OSs with no
code changes.

--
James
Not so good if your native Linux look is KDE. ;) I also hate the fact
that the GTK File Save/Open dialog box does not allow file/folder
renames. On Windows, however, wxPython is great. I guess it depends
on how big your application is and what is the target audience/
clientele.
Nov 13 '08 #3

P: n/a
rm wrote:
On Nov 13, 2:23 pm, James Harris <james.harri...@googlemail.com>
wrote:
>On 13 Nov, 18:59, Stef Mientki <stef.mien...@gmail.comwrote:

>>Abah Joseph wrote:

What is the best Python GUI API? I am planning to start my first GUI
application and I need something easy and cross platform. Qt
applications look beautiful but I hate the license. What do you advice?

I agree about the Qt-license,
and I'm now a happy wxPython user.
I too have had good results with wxwidgets when developing a GUI. The
cross-platform native look and feel was a major benefit from my point
of view allowing screens to "look native" under different OSs with no
code changes.

--
James

Not so good if your native Linux look is KDE. ;) I also hate the fact
that the GTK File Save/Open dialog box does not allow file/folder
renames. On Windows, however, wxPython is great. I guess it depends
on how big your application is and what is the target audience/
clientele.
Ok you only guess, but ...
... you're suggesting
- that if the application is too big, wxPython is not a good choice.
What's big ?
- if the target is ... ??? ... it's not a good choice, for what audience
is wxPython not suited ?
thanks,
Stef Mientki
--
http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
Nov 14 '08 #4

P: n/a
rm
On Nov 13, 7:08*pm, Stef Mientki <stef.mien...@gmail.comwrote:
rm wrote:
On Nov 13, 2:23 pm, James Harris <james.harri...@googlemail.com>
wrote:
On 13 Nov, 18:59, Stef Mientki <stef.mien...@gmail.comwrote:
>Abah Joseph wrote:
>>*What is the best Python GUI API? I am planning to start my first GUI
application and I need something easy and cross platform. Qt
applications look beautiful but I hate the license. What do you advice?
>I agree about the Qt-license,
and I'm now a happy wxPython user.
I too have had good results with wxwidgets when developing a GUI. The
cross-platform native look and feel was a major benefit from my point
of view allowing screens to "look native" under different OSs with no
code changes.
--
James
Not so good if your native Linux look is KDE. ;) *I also hate the fact
that the GTK File Save/Open dialog box does not allow file/folder
renames. *On Windows, however, wxPython is great. *I guess it depends
on how big your application is and what is the target audience/
clientele.
My very first GUI application ever was a wxPython Windows
application. You can get it from here if you like:

http://rmcorrespond.googlepages.com/..._1_0b1_exe.zip

Source Code:

http://rmcorrespond.googlepages.com/...1.0_Source.zip

(Keep in mind that I was just learning at the time, so I am not
particularly proud of the code, and I am sure most of it is deprecated
by now.)

You can say that wxPython was my first love as far as GUI development
goes. I still think it is awesome because it is very rich and
mature. But, coding with it is not as clean as it could be. There is
a lot of boiler plate code needed. And I find it a lot less
'Pythonic' than other alternatives.

If I was just going to code a small (and I mean small) GUI app for
Windows (and possibly for Gnome) I would look into PythonCard. It
uses wxPython in the background, but it provides a much nicer API.
Unfortunately, not all the power of wxPython is available that way.
(Although you can drop down to straight wxPython if needed.)

An example of a PythonCard application I wrote (for Windows) can be
obtained here:

http://rmcorrespond.googlepages.com/...me_1_0_exe.zip

Source Code:

http://rmcorrespond.googlepages.com/...1.0_Source.zip

My needs were covered between the two options above. However, two
things were bugging me. First, I wanted a better (faster) development
environment. It had to be free since all I code is Free as well. The
ones I had tried for wxPython were not cutting it. And second, in
Linux, I prefer KDE. So, I wanted something that was native to KDE.
When Trolltech released QT as a GPL toolkit I figured I would give it
a try.

What I found was very eye opening. The API was beautiful and
intuitive. The tools and IDE (Eric, QT Designer, etc.) were more
along the lines of what I was looking for. So, I became a QT
believer. Unfortunately, my work circumstances have changed and I
haven't done any more GUI programming since then. (I am a Django
coder now. :) But, if I was going to do another GUI coding project
today, I would go with QT. So, you can see where I am coming from.
Your needs may vary.
Ok you only guess, but ...
.. you're suggesting
- that if the application is too big, wxPython is not a good choice.
What's big ?
- if the target is ... ??? ... it's not a good choice, for what audience
is wxPython not suited ?
thanks,
Stef Mientki
--
http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list

Nov 14 '08 #5

P: n/a
rm
On Nov 14, 1:59*pm, rm <rmcorresp...@gmail.comwrote:
On Nov 13, 7:08*pm, Stef Mientki <stef.mien...@gmail.comwrote:
rm wrote:
On Nov 13, 2:23 pm, James Harris <james.harri...@googlemail.com>
wrote:
>On 13 Nov, 18:59, Stef Mientki <stef.mien...@gmail.comwrote:
>>Abah Joseph wrote:
>>>*What is the best Python GUI API? I am planning to start my first GUI
>>>application and I need something easy and cross platform. Qt
>>>applications look beautiful but I hate the license. What do you advice?
>>I agree about the Qt-license,
>>and I'm now a happy wxPython user.
>I too have had good results with wxwidgets when developing a GUI. The
>cross-platform native look and feel was a major benefit from my point
>of view allowing screens to "look native" under different OSs with no
>code changes.
>--
>James
Not so good if your native Linux look is KDE. ;) *I also hate the fact
that the GTK File Save/Open dialog box does not allow file/folder
renames. *On Windows, however, wxPython is great. *I guess it depends
on how big your application is and what is the target audience/
clientele.

My very first GUI application ever was a wxPython Windows
application. *You can get it from here if you like:

http://rmcorrespond.googlepages.com/..._1_0b1_exe.zip

Source Code:

http://rmcorrespond.googlepages.com/...1.0_Source.zip

(Keep in mind that I was just learning at the time, so I am not
particularly proud of the code, and I am sure most of it is deprecated
by now.)

You can say that wxPython was my first love as far as GUI development
goes. *I still think it is awesome because it is very rich and
mature. *But, coding with it is not as clean as it could be. *There is
a lot of boiler plate code needed. *And I find it a lot less
'Pythonic' than other alternatives.

If I was just going to code a small (and I mean small) GUI app for
Windows (and possibly for Gnome) I would look into PythonCard. *It
uses wxPython in the background, but it provides a much nicer API.
Unfortunately, not all the power of wxPython is available that way.
(Although you can drop down to straight wxPython if needed.)

An example of a PythonCard application I wrote (for Windows) can be
obtained here:

http://rmcorrespond.googlepages.com/...me_1_0_exe.zip

Source Code:

http://rmcorrespond.googlepages.com/...1.0_Source.zip

My needs were covered between the two options above. *However, two
things were bugging me. *First, I wanted a better (faster) development
environment. *It had to be free since all I code is Free as well. *The
ones I had tried for wxPython were not cutting it. *And second, in
Linux, I prefer KDE. *So, I wanted something that was native to KDE.
When Trolltech released QT as a GPL toolkit I figured I would give it
a try.

What I found was very eye opening. *The API was beautiful and
intuitive. *The tools and IDE (Eric, QT Designer, etc.) were more
along the lines of what I was looking for. *So, I became a QT
believer. *Unfortunately, my work circumstances have changed and I
haven't done any more GUI programming since then. *(I am a Django
coder now. :) *But, if I was going to do another GUI coding project
today, I would go with QT. *So, you can see where I am coming from.
Your needs may vary.
Ok you only guess, but ...
.. you're suggesting
- that if the application is too big, wxPython is not a good choice.
What's big ?
- if the target is ... ??? ... it's not a good choice, for what audience
is wxPython not suited ?
thanks,
Stef Mientki
--
>http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list

Oops! Here is the source code for DirClean:

http://rmcorrespond.googlepages.com/...0b1_Source.zip
Nov 14 '08 #6

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