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need help using enumerate ??

P: n/a
I am trying to take some data in file that looks like this

command colnum_1 columnum_2

and look for the command and then cange the value in the collum(word)
number indicated. I am under
the impression I need enumerate but I am not sure what to do with it
any help would be nice.

import sys

parse1filerows = []
csoundrows = []

filename = sys.argv[0]
number = sys.argv[1]
outfile = open('test.sco','w')

infile = open(filename, 'r')
for line in infile:
csoundrows.append(line.split())
parsefile = open('parsefile1.txt', 'r')
for line in parsefile:
parsefile1rows.append(line.split())
for row in csoundrows:
for prow in parsefile1rows:
test = 0
if parsefile1[prow][0] in csoundrow[row]:
for pcol in parsefile1[prow]:
if test == 1:
csoundrows[row][int(pcol)] = str(int(csoundrows[row]
[int(pcol)] + number)
for row in csoundrows:
for word in rows:
outfile.write(row)
Aug 22 '08 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
On Aug 22, 1:14 pm, "Eric_Dex...@msn.com" <Eric_Dex...@msn.comwrote:
I am trying to take some data in file that looks like this

command colnum_1 columnum_2

and look for the command and then cange the value in the collum(word)
number indicated. I am under
the impression I need enumerate but I am not sure what to do with it
any help would be nice.

import sys

parse1filerows = []
csoundrows = []

filename = sys.argv[0]
number = sys.argv[1]
outfile = open('test.sco','w')

infile = open(filename, 'r')
for line in infile:
csoundrows.append(line.split())
parsefile = open('parsefile1.txt', 'r')
for line in parsefile:
parsefile1rows.append(line.split())
for row in csoundrows:
for prow in parsefile1rows:
test = 0
if parsefile1[prow][0] in csoundrow[row]:
for pcol in parsefile1[prow]:
if test == 1:
csoundrows[row][int(pcol)] = str(int(csoundrows[row]
[int(pcol)] + number)
for row in csoundrows:
for word in rows:
outfile.write(row)
Rather confusing code there and non-functional.

You never close your file handles, when finished with a file use the
..close() method
sys.argv[0] <-- the first element is the name of your .py file and
not
the first argument you supply.
When iterating over a list like csoundrows you don't need to do
for row in csoundrows:
if ... in csoundrow[row]: # This will try to use 'row' as an
index

but rather

if ... in row:

Now, this is how I intepretted your question.

from sys import argv, exit

if len(argv) != 3:
"""Ensure the correct number of arguments are supplied"""
exit('Incorrect number of arguments.')

try:
"""Checks if the Input file exists and exits if open fails."""
inFile = open(argv[1], 'rb')
except IOError:
exit('Input file does not exist.')

if not argv[2].isdigit():
"""Argument #2 needs to be a number"""
exit('Column number is not numerical.')

idx = int(argv[2])
outFile = open('test.sco', 'wb')

"""Assuming your data in the parse file was a set of key, value pairs
to be used for replacement in the input file. Just splitting on
the
basic space and assigning the first element as the key and the rest
of
the string as the value to be used for replacement.
"""
replaceData = {}
for line in open('replacementInstructions.txt', 'rb'):
key = line.strip().split(' ')[0]
value = line.strip().split(' ')[1:]
replaceData[key] = value

"""Iterate over your input file, split the line into it's component
parts
and then lookup if the first element 'command' is contained in the
replacement data and if so change the data.
If you want all input to be saved into your output file, just
dedent
the 'outFile.write' line by one level and then all data will be
saved.
"""
for line in inFile:
record = line.strip().split(' ')
if record[0] in parseRows:
record[idx] = parseRows[record[0]]
outFile.write('%s\n' % ' '.join(record) )

inFile.close()
outFile.close()
Aug 22 '08 #2

P: n/a
On Aug 22, 7:56*am, Chris <cwi...@gmail.comwrote:
On Aug 22, 1:14 pm, "Eric_Dex...@msn.com" <Eric_Dex...@msn.comwrote:


I am trying to take some data in * file that looks like this
command colnum_1 columnum_2
and look for the command and then cange the value in the collum(word)
number indicated. *I am under
the impression I need enumerate but I am not sure what to do with it
any help would be nice.
import sys
parse1filerows = []
csoundrows = []
filename = sys.argv[0]
number = sys.argv[1]
outfile = open('test.sco','w')
infile = open(filename, 'r')
for line in infile:
* csoundrows.append(line.split())
parsefile = open('parsefile1.txt', 'r')
for line in parsefile:
* parsefile1rows.append(line.split())
for row in csoundrows:
* for prow in parsefile1rows:
* * test = 0
* * if parsefile1[prow][0] in csoundrow[row]:
* * * for pcol in parsefile1[prow]:
* * * * if test == 1:
* * * * * csoundrows[row][int(pcol)] = str(int(csoundrows[row]
[int(pcol)] + number)
for row in csoundrows:
* for word in rows:
* * outfile.write(row)

Rather confusing code there and non-functional.

You never close your file handles, when finished with a file use the
.close() method
sys.argv[0] *<-- the first element is the name of your .py file and
not
* * * * * * * * *the first argument you supply.
When iterating over a list like csoundrows you don't need to do
for row in csoundrows:
* * if ... in csoundrow[row]: *# This will try to use 'row' as an
index

* * but rather

* * if ... in row:

Now, this is how I intepretted your question.

from sys import argv, exit

if len(argv) != 3:
* * """Ensure the correct number of arguments are supplied"""
* * exit('Incorrect number of arguments.')

try:
* * """Checks if the Input file exists and exits if open fails."""
* * inFile = open(argv[1], 'rb')
except IOError:
* * exit('Input file does not exist.')

if not argv[2].isdigit():
* * """Argument #2 needs to be a number"""
* * exit('Column number is not numerical.')
There is a number to be added to the text in that column... That is a
slight edit though it still needs to be a number
>
idx = int(argv[2])
outFile = open('test.sco', 'wb')

"""Assuming your data in the parse file was a set of key, value pairs
* *to be used for replacement in the input file. *Just splitting on
the
* *basic space and assigning the first element as the key and the rest
of
* *the string as the value to be used for replacement.
"""
replaceData = {}
for line in open('replacementInstructions.txt', 'rb'):
* * key = line.strip().split(' ')[0]
* * value = line.strip().split(' ')[1:]
* * replaceData[key] = value

"""Iterate over your input file, split the line into it's component
parts
* *and then lookup if the first element 'command' is contained in the
* *replacement data and if so change the data.
* *If you want all input to be saved into your output file, just
dedent
* *the 'outFile.write' line by one level and then all data will be
saved.
"""
for line in inFile:
* * record = line.strip().split(' ')
* * if record[0] in parseRows:
* * * * record[idx] = parseRows[record[0]]
* * * * outFile.write('%s\n' % ' '.join(record) )

inFile.close()
outFile.close()- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
I need to first find if the csound command is in the line and then go
to the n'th word (a number) and add another number to it. I may need
to do that for up to 5 values in the line (maybe more for cound
commands that haven't been thought up yet). I then convert the data
back to text. These all point to ftable's when I renumber them i.e.
f1 to f3 I have to renumber them in the program file as well. .orc
and .sco.

If I load in a 5 from the file it means I have to load the data from
the 5th column and add a number to it and save it back as text. I
have found that the .close is automatically called and sometimes you
can try to close a closed file causing an error.. So I let python do
it.. instead of coding this in awk I try to emulate grid code that I
have.. I will study this though and it does have code that is useful
and helpful.

this is the easy command list I will try to do lists with var number
of commands by counting the number of words in a line ,'s exc..
Aug 22 '08 #3

P: n/a
Chris:
"""Iterate over your input file, split the line into it's component
parts
and then lookup if the first element 'command' is contained in the
replacement data and if so change the data.
If you want all input to be saved into your output file, just
dedent
the 'outFile.write' line by one level and then all data will be
saved.
"""
I'd like to have multi-line comments in Python. Your usage of multi-
lines to simulate multi-line comments may be discouraged...

Bye,
bearophile
Aug 22 '08 #4

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